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Jeremy Clarkson farm shop to open

Crop Gear: Jeremy Clarkson’s farm shop is now open

Jeremy Clarkson farm shop to open

The opening of a farm shop shouldn’t generate many column inches beyond the parish news or local rag. But most farm shops aren’t owned by Jeremy Clarkson.

His ‘unheated and meat free’ farm shop has now fully opened. As a result, you can expect the roads in and around the Oxfordshire village of Chadlington to be rather busy.

In a tweet on Friday 21 February, The Grand Tour presenter and farmer said: “My farm shop opens tomorrow afternoon. Twitter friendly as it’s unheated and meat free. Do drop in if you’re in the Chipping Norton area.”

When pressed for a precise opening time, Clarkson said: “The afternoon; like I said.” Form an orderly queue around lunchtime…

Last year, Jeremy Clarkson was forced to defend plans to build a shop at Diddly Squat Farm. Locals said the farm shop would have a “negative impact on the landscape”. At the time, Clarkson told the BBC: “I really know I’m not doing anything wrong or anything that would hurt the village.”

West Oxfordshire District Council granted planning permission last year, with approval granted on the proviso that the shop can only sell produce grown on-site or by West Oxfordshire producers. When asked whether he has grown the produce himself, Clarkson tweeted: “All of it.”

Top Beer

Jeremy Clarkson

This comes ahead of Clarkson’s new Amazon show which has the working title of ‘I Bought The Farm’. The eight-part series will see the former Top Gear presenter and “inept townie” attempting to run the 1,000-acre working farm. 

In a video released in October 2019, Jeremy Clarkson said: “Good news! I can finally confirm that I’m going to be spending the next year, in the rain, making a show about farming.

“This means people all over the world will be able to watch me using a thousand acres of the Cotswolds to make thousands of tons of beer, and bread, and vegetable oil, and lamb chops, and jumpers.”

Needless to say, the grand opening is likely to have been filmed for Amazon. For those who attended, it could be their chance to meet a star at a reasonably priced farm shop…  

See: where is Diddly Squat Farm?

Also see:

Jeremy Clarkson’s cars of the year 2019

See the Top Gear cars from the Nepal special at Beaulieu

50 years of the truck Jeremy Clarkson couldn’t kill

Jeremy Clarkson’s cars of the year 2019

Clarkson cars of the year

From dragging a Jeep Wrangler by the scruff across Colombia to becoming a seaman in the Mekong Delta, it’s amazing Jeremy Clarkson found time to actually drive any cars in 2019. Happily, he did, and he has some strong opinions on the year’s best and worst new metal.

Hot metal

Clarkson cars of the year

With everything from the Suzuki Jimny to the Ferrari 488 Pista, you can’t say this list isn’t eclectic. Very non-polarising for Clarkson, it caters for (almost) everyone. Let’s get into it…

Audi R8 V10 Spyder Performance

Clarkson cars of the year

We open with a very ‘Clarkson’ car: a screaming V10 engine in the middle and a price nearing £150,000. It’s should have his name written all over it. Not entirely so. He even admitted to pangs of guilt in operating such a gratuitous and noisy machine when watching Sir David Attenborough on Netflix. In his review for The Times, he said: “After a few days, though, normal service was resumed. I began to realise that a V10 is better than a bicycle and that having fun at 180mph is more important than having angst about plankton”. His summary of the R8? “Yes, this is what a supercar should be like.”

Toyota Supra

Clarkson cars of the year

We know Jeremy has a penchant for a deftly-measured, well-judged sports car and the Toyota Supra has to be a top 2019 contender there. It’s not quite up to it, he reckons, saying in The Times: “It’s not underwhelming, by any means, but neither is it overwhelming. It’s just whelming and I was expecting, I dunno, a bit of chilli and lemongrass in the mix”.

Suzuki Jimny

Clarkson cars of the year

In his love of the Suzuki Jimny, Clarkson reaffirms that he is indeed an automotive masochist. Torturous though operating the Jimny can often be, it’s relentlessly good fun. “As you bounce along with your ears bleeding, you will have a smile on your face,” he said. “And you’ll be making other road users smile, too.”

Ferrari 488 Pista

Clarkson cars of the year

Clarkson is in love with a new Ferrari. In other news, water is wet. In spite of its expense and poor equipment levels, he describes the Ferrari 488 Pista as “one of the most exciting, thrilling, beautiful and satisfying cars ever made”. He’s so impressed with it, he reckons James May might have to scrap his Ferrari 458 Speciale, due to the fact the Pista has rendered it worthless.

Range Rover Velar SVAutobiography

Clarkson cars of the year

Next on the list of cars that no one is surprised Clarkson loves, a slightly smaller Range Rover that JLR’s in-house SVO tuning division has stuffed a V8 into. Clarkson says: “There’s something about the Velar that turns the rational side of your brain to mush”. The Velar SVAutobiography is the one to have, he says, because of its V8, which is good for 0-62mph in 4.5 seconds and 170mph. “In a Range Rover, for crying out loud”. No arguments here.

Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio

Clarkson cars of the year

Is the apocalypse upon us? Is hell freezing over? We only ask because one of Clarkson’s cars of the year appears to be a crossover SUV. Happily, it’s one of the very best, so you can stop stockpiling tinned food. The Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio is also the only crossover with an engine sourced from Ferrari… kind of. Clarkson spends most of his summary talking about the Ferrari-flavoured bit, saying “The noise it makes can curdle blood at 500 paces. This is an engine that wants you to open all the stops, all the time”.

Audi TTS Roadster

Clarkson cars of the year

Clarkson’s summary of the Audi TTS Roadster says nothing we didn’t already know. In short, it’s no Porsche Cayman rival. It’s a very good car, but not if you’re in the market for a sports car. He says in The Times “all that horsepower, 93m miles of headroom and four-wheel drive and, actually, you know what? I’ll walk. I need the exercise”.

Ford Mustang GT V8 Convertible

Clarkson cars of the year

The Mustang is a very ‘Clarkson’ car, isn’t it? It was his muscle car of choice on his trip to Detroit on The Grand Tour. Although thoroughly modernised, by any other yardstick, it remains a blunt instrument. But Clarkson isn’t bothered. He says in The Times: “Crikey, it has a big heart. This is a car you treat like a dog. You want to tickle it behind its door mirrors and let it sit by the fire on cold evenings. And when it develops a wobble at tickover, you don’t get cross with it; you worry”.

Mercedes-AMG A35

Clarkson cars of the year

We can’t have a list of 2019 motoring talking-points without a hot hatch or two. The Mercedes-AMG A35 has been eagerly anticipated, given how popular the last A45 AMG was. In spite of being the comparatively lukewarm precursor to the full-fat A45, Clarkson was taken with its performance, saying: “This thing flies. It’s a mad ride, full of jolts and judders and stars flying past at breakneck speed. It’s properly exciting.”

Renault Megane RS Trophy

Clarkson cars of the year

The Merc is very, er, German, though. If you take your hot hatches in a more traditionally French and scrappy guise, then Clarkson is also a proponent of the Renault Megane RS Trophy. “When you take this car by the scruff of the neck, it’s a riot of colour and sound and terror,” he said. “I’ve never taken LSD on the world’s fastest rollercoaster, except now I sort of have”.

Peugeot Rifter GT Line

Clarkson cars of the year

Has Clarkson taken leave of his senses? Is a Peugeot Rifter really one of his most-enjoyed cars of 2019? If you can believe it, yes. The practicality and the ride quality that defeats speed bumps won him over. “I’ll be honest, I loved it,” he said. Apparently its arrival at The Grand Tour office was met with uproarious laughter at his expense.

BMW X5

Clarkson cars of the year

The Times said this list would include hits and misses. While some of the above machinery has copped a bit of criticism, there’s nothing as scathing as Clarkson has been capable of in the past. But the new BMW X5 doesn’t get an easy ride. From the key that “feels like a 1970s television set in your pocket,” to the overly-intrusive assisted steering, Clarkson reckons the X5 “is full of stuff that’s not been thought through. It’s a long time since I drove a car with as many design flaws”. Whoops.

Jeremy Clarkson has a new Amazon show

Jeremy Clarkson farming programme amazon

Jeremy Clarkson is to star in a new Amazon Prime Video show and, in a break from the norm, he will be on his own. That is, without his ex-Top Gear and The Grand Tour co-hosts, James May and Richard Hammond.

Well, it wouldn’t make sense really, given that Clarkson’s new show will be focused on farming. With a working title of I Bought The Farm, it will follow Clarkson in his purchase and attempted running of a 1,000-acre farm.

“I’m excited to be one of Jeremy’s farm hands,” said Peter Fincham, co-CEO of Expectation, the company producing the show. 

“He’s really passionate about farming, and tractors, and all the other stuff that he thinks he knows about. This series will showcase a new, wiser, muddier Jeremy than we’ve seen before. Can’t wait.”

How hard can it be?

Taking place over the course of a farming year, we’ll get to watch Jeremy, a self-confessed ‘inept townie’ throw himself in at the deep end of this agricultural endeavour. Expect emotions, small successes, catastrophic failures and a barrel of laughs, and we suspect you won’t be disappointed.

“Good news! I can finally confirm that I’m going to be spending the next year, in the rain, making a show about farming for Amazon Prime,” Clarkson said in a preview video.

“Of course, to be a farmer, you have to be an agronomist, a businessman, a politician, an accountant, a vet, and a mechanic. And I’m… none of those things. I don’t even know what agronomist means.”

Jeremy’s rustic nightmare: a new era for the big three presenters

Jeremy Clarkson farming programme amazon

This is the first of a selection of new projects that Amazon announced it was working on individually with three TGT presenters. 

This doesn’t mean The Grand Tour is on hold: there are big changes to come. However, there won’t be any studio work for the foreseeable future.

Jeremy Clarkson’s cars of the year 2019

Clarkson's cars of the year

The second News UK Motor Awards event was held yesterday, announcing the cars of the year decided upon by journalists from the UK’s premier newspapers, including a certain Jeremy Clarkson, although he only appeared to weigh in on the faster stuff. Let’s round up the winners.

Clarkson’s cars of the year

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Bentley Continental GT V8

It’s back! The Continental GT V8 claims the ultimate prize: a recommendation from Jeremy Clarkson as the ‘People’s Car of the Year’. We’re sure there’s something to be said about how in-touch with ‘the people’ Clarkson is if his ‘people’s car’ is a £100,000+ Bentley, but that’s the Jezza way.

Ferrari 488 Pista

Although it’s been superseded by the Ferrari F8 Tributo, the outgoing 488 Pista claims the coveted Clarkson Supercar of the Year award. Jezza, we’ve little to no arguments on that front.

The sensible stuff

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Range Rover Evoque

The new Range Rover Evoque was awarded Family SUV of the Year. It’s a worthy winner, as a long-awaited update to the marque’s big-selling miniature ‘Rangie’.

Volvo XC40

Volvo’s XC40 takes home the Small SUV/crossover of the Year award. It’s another we can agree on. This is a quirky yet classy, high quality and capable fly in the German establishment’s ointment.

Ford Fiesta

Although it’s been around for a couple of years now, as per the brilliant Ford Fiesta wins Small Car of the Year for 2019. We can get behind that. Nothing’s come along since to challenge it, although we’ll be driving the new Peugeot 208 very soon…

Nissan X Trail

Getting rather specific is the award for Dog-friendly Car of the Year. Still, this is Britain. We’re nothing without our pups. To that end, the Nissan X-Trail takes home the award for dog-friendly car of the year. We’ll stick with a Mercedes-AMG E63 Estate… 

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Tesla Model 3

Could anything else have won Green Car of the Year? The Tesla Model 3 delivers brand coolness, questionable quality, undeniable performance and an affordable price point to a wider range of buyers. Arguably a contender for overall Car of the Year, even though it was revealed three years ago…

Kia Picanto

The worthy little Kia Picanto wins Value Car of the Year. We can’t argue with that, though for us the Volkswagen Up! GTI could be in with a shout in terms of bang for your buck.

Volvo V60

You can’t go far wrong with a Volvo estate for a family car. A fact reflected in the humble model’s winning of Family Car of the Year. Not many cars combine style, safety and sensibleness with quite the aplomb of the V60.

The fun stuff

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Ford Ranger Raptor

Ford’s UK-friendly baja-basher wins Adventure Car of the Year. We can absolutely get behind this. Motoring Research’s Tim Pitt said: “In the right environment, this pumped-up pick-up is as exciting as any supercar. Forget that Ferrari.” Advice we’d pass on to Mr Clarkson.

Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante

We’re not absolutely convinced by the Sports Car of the Year award. Our money would go into a McLaren 600LT Spyder if we were buying a sports car. Still, the Aston is a lovely thing all the same. Tim Pitt said: “Coupe or Volante, I think this is the best car Aston Martin currently makes”. High praise in such an accomplished lineup.

Mercedes-AMG A35

The hot hatch market is a hotly contested one. Could the Mercedes-Benz A35 be overshadowed by the likes of the Renault Sport Megane Trophy R? In terms of value, perhaps not. The Merc is a lovely thing and, in the very strange world we live in now, cheaper to buy than a specced out Renault Megane.

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Bentley Continental GT V8

The second of two gongs for the big ‘Benters’ is British-built Car of the Year. It’s a lovely thing, though for our money it’d be a tough toss-up between the aforementioned DBS and a McLaren 600LT…

Porsche 911

The Sunday Times Car of the Year is the Porsche 911. Is it really a motoring awards ceremony if the latest Porsche 911 doesn’t win something? It’s a worthy winner, too. Somehow, even though it’s the fastest, most capable, and most digital 911 ever, the new 992 still has that quintessential Porsche sports car sizzle.

Mercedes-AMG S 63 Cabrio

The mega Merc wins Luxury Car of the Year overall. We can’t fault it on that front, even if it’s approaching pensionable age. Could the new Bentley Flying Spur have been in with a shout? No matter, we’ll take the S 63 if we must…

 

 

 

Jeremy Clarkson COTY

Jeremy Clarkson has named his car of the year

Jeremy Clarkson COTY

The inaugural News UK Motor Awards are in and even Jeremy Clarkson is in on the fun – he’s picked his car of the year.

The awards cover a wide range of cars, with journalists from The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and talkSPORT getting involved in the selection process. Yes, being a Times contributor, that means Clarkson is in on it too. Predictably, he gets his own category. We suppose Clarkson over-ruling everyone else and picking the Ford GT as the family car of the year might have caused a few issues.

So, while the likes of Family Car of the Year and Commuter Car of the Year were awarded to the Volvo V60 and Volkswagen Golf GTE respectively, Clarkson’s car of the year goes at a somewhat different – and heightened – pace. His car of the year is… the Lamborghini Huracan Performante.

Jeremy Clarkson COTY

He might be a year late on this one, but we can forgive him, given how exceptional Lambo’s baby track weapon is. That V10 is unrivalled for drama in the supercar segment and it has driving experience to match. Knowing Clarkson, though, we’re surprised he didn’t deprive it of honours for those spinally challenging seats…

Anyway, other notable winners are Jaguar I-Pace, Aston Martin DBS, Aston Martin Vantage and Honda Civic Type R. They won green car, best-designed car, sports car and hot hatch of the year respectively. The Sun’s car of the year was the new Fiesta ST. The Sunday Times car of the year was the Jaguar I-Pace. The weirdest award? The new Land Rover Discovery with dog-friendly car of the year.

Watch our video on the Lamborghini Huracan Performante below:

Read more:

Mazda MX-5 vx Zenos E10 S vs Alfa Romeo 4C

These are all the cars featured on The Grand Tour so far

The Grand Tour: all the cars so far

It’s Friday, which means it’s time for another episode of The Grand Tour. This week, Clarkson, Hammond and May are in Rotterdam, a place with well-dressed policemen and the home of the speed camera. Anyway, these are the cars featured this week…

Mazda MX-5 vx Zenos E10 S vs Alfa Romeo 4C

Mazda MX-5 vx Zenos E10 S vs Alfa Romeo 4C

Richard Hammond claims the Mazda MX-5 is “all the sports car you’d ever need,” and it’s a bargain – with prices starting at £18,495. The new model comes with air-con, heated seats, lane-departure assist, cruise control, rain-sensing wipers, dusk-sensing headlamps… all of which makes it better, says Hammond.

Zenos E10 S

James May disagrees. Quoting Lotus founder Colin Chapman, he says these extras add weight meaning it’s not a true sports car any more. Which is why Captain Slow’s picked the Zenos E10 S, which manages without a radio, roof or even a heater. It does, however, have a 250hp Ford Focus ST engine.

To decide which is better, the pair head to the “obvious proving ground for all sports cars”: North Africa.

Alfa Romeo 4C

And then Clarkson turns up in an Alfa Romeo 4C. He insists it’s his “favourite car currently on sale”, despite the dim-witted gearbox, lifeless steering and eagerness to chuck you in a ditch for no reason. He justifies it by saying: “Put it this way, we all could probably find fault with our children, and yet we still love them.”

It also gives Clarkson cramp, and it costs more than the Mazda and Zenos put together.

The Grand Tour

The group test concludes with a race between the three sports cars through a film set used in The Jewel of the Nile and Game of Thrones. The sandy roads make for a lot of oversteer and ends with Hammond sliding sideways into an ancient sculpture. Despite this, Hammond in the MX-5 is the fastest around the track, but admits it’s a hollow victory.

Car battleships

Car battleships

Kids of today are no longer interested in board games, apparently. But The Grand Tour trio reckoned they would be if they could play life-size versions. So, they borrowed a crane, a fleet of old bangers and a line-up of G-Wiz electric cars. The results were rather spectacular – but we can’t help wondering if the G-Wiz owners’ club might be penning letters as you read this.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS vs BMW M4 GTS

Porsche 911 GT3 RS vs BMW M4 GTS

Missed episode four? Last week’s episode started with Clarkson singing the praises of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS. “Oh, it’s very, very good,” he says, as he slides the GT3 RS around The Grand Tour’s Eboladrome test track. But is it as good as the BMW M4 GTS?

Clarkson gives the BMW M4 GTS a bit of a pasting in The Grand Tour. He slates the lack of practicality, and complains that the ride is too bumpy while the “drone from the tyres is horrendous”. You might be expecting a “but”… but it doesn’t come (yet). He complains about having to fill the water tank for the engine’s water injection, while he describes the steering as “horrid”.

It sounds like there’s a clear winner, then, with Clarkson concluding: “This competition between these two cars is like a boxing match between an actual boxer and someone who thinks he’s a boxer because they’re wearing satin shorts.”

But… and, eventually, there is a “but”, the BMW M4 is crowned the winner, solely because Richard Hammond has bought a Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Sustainable cars

Sustainable cars

“In recent years, the world’s carmakers have made great strides to make more fuel-efficient and more environmentally-friendly car engines,” says Hammond, “but very little has been done to make more environmentally-friendly car bodies and interiors.”

This gave the team an idea. The three of them bought an old Land Rover Discovery and gave it a more eco-friendly appearance…

An old Land Rover Discovery covered in mud isn’t such an unusual sight, but what about one made of mud? This one weighs five tonnes, and chunks fall off it during driving. It soon requires a re-think, with May rebuilding it out of bricks. That doesn’t work particularly well either, so eventually James resorts to straw and cow poo. And, you guessed it, that’s not exactly problem-free.

Sustainable cars

Hammond’s attempt features a frame made out of hazel before being covered in flowers and shrubs. “It’s basically a hedgerow,” he says. The flowers are planted in compost and nutrients, meaning they’re still growing – and, as Hammond puts it, “you don’t wash this car, you water it.”

And finally, Clarkson’s attempt at being green is a little more controversial. It uses animal skin and bones, with ears for door mirrors and a cow’s rectum as the windscreen. It has its pitfalls – dogs tear it apart overnight, meaning Jeremy has to visit the local butcher to repair his car. Watch the episode to find out whose attempt at sustainable transport worked the best.

Jensen Interceptors

Jensen Interceptors

Episode three began with the sight of the three presenters making their way to Whitby at the wheel of a trio of Jensen Interceptors. It’s a fitting choice of car for an episode dominated by three British blokes gallivanting around Tuscany, as the Interceptor was very much an Anglo-Italian GT car.

Clarkson and May decided to visit Italy to embark on a very modern take on the classic Grand Tour recipe. A journey of art, of culture and of fine food is planned. The question is: what cars should the duo drive?

Aston Martin DB11

Aston Martin DB11

For Clarkson, the choice is the new Aston Martin DB11. Arguably one of the greatest GT cars you can buy today, the DB11 packs a 5.2-litre twin-turbo V12 engine, producing a mighty 608hp. It’ll reach a top speed of 200mph, a figure that gives Clarkson some much needed bragging rights later in the show. Oh, and if anybody asks, the car is Sunburst Orange. Not brown. Definitely not brown.

Rolls-Royce Dawn

Rolls-Royce Dawn

As for May, he decides to lord it about in Tuscany with the help of the Rolls-Royce Dawn. If it looks familiar, that’s because it’s the same one Matt LeBlanc drove in the latest series of Top Gear (and we tested it earlier this year). Clarkson does his best to convince May that it’s little more than a BMW 7-Series in a fancy suit, but the long-haired one is not for turning. The scene is set: Clarkson and May are ready to head into the beautifully manicured hills of Tuscany. Or are they?

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat

No, because – surprise, surprise – Richard Hammond turns up in a very loud and very thirsty Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. The 707hp all-American action hero isn’t your typical GT car, but then the Grand Tour isn’t your typical car show. Hammond justifies the Hellcat by likening the original concept of a Grand Tour as a little like an “18th century Cannonball Run”.

What follows is a road trip that feels very much like an episode you might have seen during the old days of Top Gear. Clarkson and May spend most of the time attempting to escape from Hammond, while Hammond himself spends most of his time in petrol stations. Describing Hammond and his Hellcat, May said: “It’s like someone being sick on you while you read a nice book.”

Jezza’s self-driving car

Jezza’s self-driving car

Back in the tent, the trio urge the buying public to stop buying cars like the Renault Kadjar and Nissan Juke, while Clarkson presents his own take on Google’s self-driving car. “How hard can it be?” asks Jezza. You can judge the results for yourself. Meanwhile, look out for a very explosive ending…

Aston Martin Vulcan

Aston Martin Vulcan

Now, let’s look back at episode two. The episode starts with Clarkson hammering around a track in Aston Martin’s rather special, track-only £1.8 million Vulcan. Only 24 will ever be made but Clarkson doesn’t seem that impressed from the start.

“You will be able to edit this out, won’t you? I don’t want people thinking I’m fat,” he jibes as he struggles to get into the hypercar. He then tears it apart for being uncomfortable and not very well equipped – the windows don’t go down, it’s noisy and “you only get half a steering wheel”.

All Aston Martin Vulcan buyers can have it shipped out to a racetrack of their choice where a team of mechanics will set it up for them and show them how to drive it – all part of the service. In typical Clarkson review style, by the time he’s spent some time driving it aggressively, he’s rather more convinced.

“I LOVE THIS THING VERY MUCH,” he concludes, shoutily.

Once The Grand Tour’s American racing driver Mike Skinner prises the keys from Clarkson’s grip, he sets a time of 1:15.5 around the show’s test track – that’s 2.4 seconds quicker than a McLaren 650S, the outgoing leader.

Audi S8 Plus in Jordan

Audi S8 Plus in Jordan

Now onto the mean feature of episode two. Jordan, in the Middle East, has built a mock town where special forces around the world are sent to compete and decide which one’s best. What’s this got to do with The Grand Tour..?

“Mr Wilman, who is the fat man who controls our lives [and executive producer of The Grand Tour], decided that us three should go and take part,” explains James May.

Now, those who were hoping The Grand Tour would be a ‘proper’ car show might be a tad disappointed with this feature. But it involves guns and helicopters, and they’re cool, right?

It also features an Audi S8 Plus used as a getaway car to transport the Queen (yes, it’s definitely her) away from terrorists. Clarkson and May can’t help but review the car, praising its ride quality and performance.

Spinning in an E30 BMW 3 Series

Spinning in an E30 BMW 3 Series

The final feature of Episode Two is what Clarkson describes as “making James May do something that he doesn’t want to do.” The first of what’s likely to be an on-going feature involves ‘spinning’, a South African thing that involves doing donuts in an elderly, rear-wheel-drive car to a backdrop of rap music.

“It’s lively, it’s interesting and it’s youthful. It’s everything he [James May] isn’t,” Clarkson explains.

Apparently, old E30 BMW 3 Series models are a popular choice for the sport, so that’s what James May is taken out in. He’s not very impressed when his driver gets out and leaves him in the car doing donuts by itself. So that’s all the cars featured in Episode Two…

McLaren P1, LaFerrari and Porsche 918

Not watched the first episode yet? The team managed to get the “hypercar holy trinity” of the McLaren P1, LaFerrari and Porsche 918 together. It’s a group test that the team never managed on Top Gear – the car manufacturers wouldn’t co-operate, apparently, and while the crew were desperately trying to convince owners to let them borrow their cars, the fracas happened and ruined it all. Until now.

McLaren P1 - The Grand Tour

The McLaren P1 is Clarkson’s hypercar of choice. The plug-in hybrid uses a twin-turbocharged 3.8-litre V8 petrol engine combined with an electric motor to produce 917hp. It’ll hit 0-62mph in 2.8 seconds and reach an electronically-limited top speed of 218mph. Without its limiter, the P1 is good for 249mph.

Prices for the McLaren P1 started at £866,000. Only 375 were made, with the last one leaving the firm’s Woking production line in September 2013. There are currently four listed on Auto Trader – but you’ll need to splash out at least £1,675,000. Call it an investment.

LaFerrari - The Grand Tour

The LaFerrari’s power (all 963hp of it) comes from a 6.3-litre V12 combined with an electric motor. The 0-62mph run is dispatched in less than 3.0 seconds, while top speed is more than 217mph. James May reckoned it would “absolutely mince” the other two…

Just 499 LaFerraris were sold worldwide at a cost of around £1 million each. There’s currently just one listed on Auto Trader, for an incredible £3.5 million.

Porsche 918 - The Grand Tour

Now onto Richard Hammond’s choice, the Porsche 918. Power comes from a 4.6-litre V8 engine combined with not one but two electric motors, producing a total power output of 887hp. In standard guise, it’d hit 62mph in 2.5 seconds and was capable of a top speed of 218hp. The one featured in The Grand Tour has the optional Weissach Package – a £60,000 pack which reduces weight and can lap the Nürburgring three seconds quicker than the standard 918.

Meanwhile, the Porsche 918 would have cost you a relatively affordable £625,000 when it was on sale. But today you’ll be looking at paying at least £1.1 million on the second-hand market.

Spoiler alert: the fastest around The Grand Tour’s new test track was the Porsche 918 (1:54.2), followed by the LaFerrari (1:54.4) and McLaren P1 (1:55.5). Clarkson promised Hammond and May they could bulldoze his house if the McLaren didn’t win.

Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang

The hypercar trio aside, what else did Clarkson, Hammond and May drive in the first episode of The Grand Tour? Well, it starts with the threesome driving through the States in red, white and blue Ford Mustangs. Powered by a 5.0-litre V8, the latest Ford Mustang (and the only to officially be sold in Europe) will hit 62mph in 4.8 seconds. It also features a burnout mode. And this wasn’t all…

Ferrari 488

Ferrari 488

New programme… new track. To show off the “eboladrome”, The Grand Tour’s unidentified driver completed a lap in a “performance icon”, the Ferrari 488. Unfortunately Ferrari wouldn’t let them time it.

BMW M2

The Grand Tour - BMW M2

It’s one of our favourite ever BMWs – and Clarkson’s now dubbed it “the best M car BMW has ever made”. The BMW M2 produces 365hp from its turbocharged 3.0-litre straight six and, as Clarkson proves on track, it’s very happy to flatter the driver in some oversteer fun.

He concludes that the BMW M2 is “an absolute masterpiece”.

James May’s Prius

James May’s Prius

Teasing the show, The Grand Tour has planted three ‘crashed’ Toyota Priuses around the world. The first one, sporting the number plate ‘M4Y’ and ‘The Grand Tour’ decals, was seen squashed against a postbox outside London’s King’s Cross station.

Richard Hammond’s Prius

Richard Hammond’s Prius

Meanwhile, a red Prius with the plate ‘H4MMOND’ was seen crashing through the ground in Berlin…

Jeremy Clarkson’s Prius

Jeremy Clarkson’s Prius

And sporting, you guessed it, a ‘CL4RKSON’’ number plate, this blue Toyota Prius was spotted in LA. Previously, the controversial presenter described Prius owners as ‘morons who think they’re saving the planet’.

The Grand Tour hosts go commando in episode 2: Operation Desert Stumble

The Grand Tour episode 2 teaser revealed: Operation Desert Stumble

The Grand Tour hosts go commando in episode 2: Operation Desert Stumble

The second episode of The Grand Tour will be available from 00:01am tomorrow – and a teaser clip revealed today suggests it could be even more action-packed than the first in the series.

The episode, titled ‘Operation Desert Stumble’ is hosted by Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May from a tent in Johannesburg, South Africa.

In the clip, the ex-Top Gear hosts are seen dodging explosions and ‘going commando’ as they are forced to become special forces soldiers with an all-action challenge at a top secret training base, deep in Jordan.

The Grand Tour hosts go commando in episode 2: Operation Desert Stumble

Meanwhile, Jeremy Clarkson tests the 800hp Aston Martin Vulcan around the Grand Tour test track, while James May investigates an unusual form of motorsport called spinning. Judging by his face in the teaser clip, it’s not asport he’s set to take up anytime soon.

Last week’s episode has attracted a lot of positive comments on social media – with many likening it to Top Gear with a bigger budget.

Episode one featured a group test between the hypercar trio of the Porsche 918, McLaren P1 and LaFerrari.

The Grand Tour: Clarkson, Hammond and May filming in Yorkshire

The Grand Tour: everything we know so far

The Grand Tour: Clarkson, Hammond and May filming in Yorkshire

Amazon has announced that The Grand Tour will be available to watch on its Prime streaming service from 00:01 GMT on Friday 18th November.

It comes after months of filming including studio recordings in its tent around the world – from Whitby, Yorkshire, to Nashville, Tennessee.

The Grand Tour: Clarkson, Hammond and May filming in Yorkshire

What do we know about The Grand Tour?

For a start, excitement reached fever pitch with the release of the first official trailer. In just 90 seconds, the trailer passes the Mark Kermode ‘six laughs test’, suggesting The Grand Tour might be worth the extremely long wait. In fact, it feels like they never really went away…

There are cars, obviously, but there’s so much more besides. James May has fractured his arm. Jeremy Clarkson is attempting to pull a camel. There’s a tank. Jet skis. Not to mention a reference to Roger Moore and his white suit, in a setting that looks straight out of The Spy Who Loved Me. Excited? Read on to find out what else we know about The Grand Tour.

It won’t be on mainstream TV

Following Clarkson’s ‘fracas’, which led to the trio leaving the BBC, there was much speculation about where they’d appear next. Some expected them to appear on rival TV channels ITV, Channel 4 or Channel 5 – but a clause in their contracts reportedly meant they wouldn’t be able to appear on a mainstream TV channel.

It’ll be shown on Amazon

The clause didn’t apply to online streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime, however – which partly explains why the trio will be appearing on Amazon’s Instant Video service.

It’ll be called The Grand Tour…

The Grand Tour: what we know so far

Another point that attracted a great deal of speculation was the name of the show. Many expected it to be called ‘Gear Knobs’ following a trademark application by a firm linked to the show, but Clarkson quickly quashed the rumours. A lawyer reportedly told the trio that it would be ‘unwise’ to use a name so close to Top Gear.

…because it is a ‘grand tour’

So why is The Grand Tour (or GT for short – the reverse of TG) called The Grand Tour? Simple, really – because it is a grand tour. Originally the series was expected to be filmed in countries around the world without a studio segment – but now a studio segment is expected, shot in tents in those various locations.

James May wanted to call it ‘Nigel’ or ‘Roger’

Not everyone approves of the name – with some suggesting it’s a tad dull. Even James May admitted it wasn’t his first choice of name… “I wanted to call it ‘Nigel’, or ‘Roger’,” he said. “We needed a name, and they’re names.”

It’ll be filmed around the world

It’ll be filmed around the world

An episode of The Grand Tour has already been shot in Johannesburg, South Africa, while other episodes are expected to be filmed in the UK, Germany and the USA. As expected, the big green tent has been erected in Yorkshire.

This is what the logo looks like

The official logo was leaked on Reddit in June, with Richard Hammond confirming on Facebook that it was correct. He said: “Right, well, that saves us the bother of thinking up a clever way to unveil our new show’s logo: It has leaked. Not in the way my Landie leaks oil or James May leaks if he laughs or goes on a trampoline, I mean leaks as in the secret is out.

“Serves us right for trying to secure a European trademark. All things European proving a little tricky this week.”

The Grand Tour’s production company is called W. Chump and Sons

Following the trio’s departure from the BBC, they established a TV production company along with former Top Gear executive producer Andy Wilman. The firm, which is responsible for The Grand Tour, is based in London and features the initial letters of its directors’ surnames in its name.

…and it owns four Reliant Robin company cars

...and it owns four Reliant Robin company cars

Naturally, while looking for offices in London, the company put ‘generous parking space’ high on its list of priorities. It then filled some of those parking spaces with four Reliant Robins, bought as company cars for the four directors. They cost ‘less than £15,000’ and, Clarkson insists, they’re used regularly.

James May hurt his finger during filming

Although not quite as big a deal as Hammond’s jet-powered crash during Top Gear filming in 2006, James May is thought to have hurt his finger during filming for The Grand Tour. Clarkson tweeted that he had a ‘poorly finger’.

Jeremy Clarkson has struggled to find steak

Clarkson was famously sacked from Top Gear following a ‘fracas’ when a hotel refused to serve him steak because the chef had gone home. It seems that nothing has changed with filming of The Grand Tour, as he tweeted this picture with the caption: “People of South Africa. What is this nonsense?”

It will feature a Ford Focus RS

It will feature a Ford Focus RS

Although there’s expected to be the usual amount of ‘messing around’ between the presenters, The Grand Tour is ultimately a car show. We don’t know exactly which cars will appear, but Clarkson tweeted this picture of the new Ford Focus RS and Ford Mustang.

And ‘our’ Rolls-Royce Dawn

He also tweeted a picture of James May in a Rolls-Royce Dawn that looks suspiciously like the one Matt LeBlanc drove on Top Gear (and, more importantly, Motoring Research also drove earlier this year).

As well as the Aston Martin DB11

Aston’s DB9 replacement is expected to be one of the hottest cars of 2016, and Clarkson also revealed on Twitter that he’d been driving it. “It’s going to be a brutal day on the Grand Tour,” he said. “I’m driving an Aston Martin DB11 across Tuscany.”

The Grand Tour cost Amazon £160m

Although Amazon has never revealed how much it paid to bag The Grand Tour, it’s believed to be in the region of £160 million. That’s one of Amazon’s biggest deals ever.

The Grand Tour will be shown in autumn

The Grand Tour will be shown in autumn

Amazon Prime has confirmed the show will stream weekly from 18th November 2016. So you don’t have long to wait.

There’ll be 36 episodes

You’ll be pleased to know Clarkson, Hammond and May are unlikely to ‘do an Evans’ – they’re all contracted for 36 episodes, split up into three series. If they’re successful, Amazon’s likely to extend that.

It’ll cost £79 to watch it

Amazon will be hoping The Grand Tour will be a big seller for its Prime video service – as you’ll need to subscribe to watch the new show. It costs £79 a year, or you can pay £7.99 a month – and new members get a 30-day free trial. Sign up to that closer to the launch date and you’ll be able to watch several episodes for nothing.

There won’t be a Stig

Although the format is expected to be very similar to Top Gear, certain features including The Stig and Star in a Reasonably Priced Car belong to the BBC – so for copyright reasons, they won’t appear on The Grand Tour.

Jeremy Clarkson's The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Jeremy Clarkson's The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Jeremy Clarkson's The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Amazon has announced this morning that it’s taking The Grand Tour to Scotland – and invited fans to apply for tickets to its tent on the banks of Loch Ness.

It comes after Clarkson, Hammond and May filmed an episode in Whitby last month – returning to the county where the infamous Top Gear ‘fracas’ took place.

“We can’t wait to bring The Grand Tour tent back to the UK,” said VP of Amazon Video Europe, Jay Marine. “The guys had a great time filming in Whitby last month and we’re excited to bring the tent to Scotland. Demand for tickets to all recordings has been phenomenal with applications coming in from around the globe, so get in quick for an opportunity to join Jeremy, James and Richard at this monster location.”

The Grand Tour will be available to watch on Amazon Prime from 18th November, with new episodes being released every week for 12 weeks.

The ex-Top Gear trio have been travelling around the world with their pop-up studio – visiting exotic locations including Johannesburg, California, Whitby and Rotterdam.

Lapland, Stuttgart and Nashville will also be visited by the big tent.

Fans can apply for tickets until midnight on Friday 4th November and successful applicants will be contacted over the next few weeks.

Jeremy Clarkson's The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Jeremy Clarkson’s The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Jeremy Clarkson's The Grand Tour is going to Scotland

Amazon has announced this morning that it’s taking The Grand Tour to Scotland – and invited fans to apply for tickets to its tent on the banks of Loch Ness.

It comes after Clarkson, Hammond and May filmed an episode in Whitby last month – returning to the county where the infamous Top Gear ‘fracas’ took place.

“We can’t wait to bring The Grand Tour tent back to the UK,” said VP of Amazon Video Europe, Jay Marine. “The guys had a great time filming in Whitby last month and we’re excited to bring the tent to Scotland. Demand for tickets to all recordings has been phenomenal with applications coming in from around the globe, so get in quick for an opportunity to join Jeremy, James and Richard at this monster location.”

The Grand Tour will be available to watch on Amazon Prime from 18th November, with new episodes being released every week for 12 weeks.

The ex-Top Gear trio have been travelling around the world with their pop-up studio – visiting exotic locations including Johannesburg, California, Whitby and Rotterdam.

Lapland, Stuttgart and Nashville will also be visited by the big tent.

Fans can apply for tickets until midnight on Friday 4th November and successful applicants will be contacted over the next few weeks.