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Porsche 996 to 911 GT3 RS

A Porsche 991 GT3 RS for £27,950, but there is a catch

Porsche 996 to 911 GT3 RS

You could spend upwards of £200,000 on a nearly new Porsche 911 GT3 RS. Or you could save yourself the best part of £170,000 by opting for a Porsche Carrera 4+Custom 996 to 911 991 GT3 RS Replica+Race Spec+997+F1+4×4.

Admittedly, the name doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, and you’re unlikely to find this particular model in a Big Book of Porsche History, but it might save you a tidy sum. Not to mention countless calls to Porsche dealers as you search for a new 911 GT3 RS for the recommended retail price.

The ad claims – in uppercase text, for maximum impact: “HERE WE HAVE A VERY UNIQUE VEHICLE FOR SALE.”

We’re not entirely sure that something can be very unique, but we’ll run it with.

“THIS 996 HAS UNDERGONE A COMPLETE TRANSFORMATION TO A WHOLE NEW LEVEL. COMPLETELY CHANGING THE DESIGN OF THE CAR TO A COMPLETE MONSTER.”

Actually, Halloween has been and gone. Besides, is this “complete monster” designed to be a trick or a treat?

Porsche 996 to 911 GT3 RS advert

“THIS VEHICLE HAS A FULL BODYKIT SUPPLIED AND FITTED BY XCLUSIVE CUSTOMZ. HERE WE HAVE A PORSCHE 911 996 FULLY CONVERTED TO THE BRAND NEW 991 GT3 RS. THIS VEHICLE IS A COPY OF A £250000 SUPER CAR.”

No expense has been spared in creating this ‘copy’ of a new 991 GT3 RS, making it unrecognisable from its 996 Carrera 4 former self. Indeed, Porsche aficionados might find it unrecognisable from a 991 GT3 RS. But we digress.

There are many reasons why this is not a ‘copy’ of a Porsche 911 GT3 RS, not least the absence of a 4.0-litre six-cylinder engine developing 500hp. But hey, a GT3 RS owner doesn’t get to play with a manual gearbox.

Besides, as the ad claims: “THERE IS NOT ANOTHER LIKE THIS ON THE MARKET.” This is the truth. We checked on Auto Trader.

According to the DVLA, this “metallic white” Porsche 911 is actually listed as ‘grey’ and was registered in October 2001. It comes with a fresh MOT, having failed the test the first time for the nearside front headlamp not working on dipped beam. That’ll be those costly aftermarket LED headlights playing up.

If this GT3 RS doesn’t float your boat, Xclusive Customz will offer you a ‘Porsche 996 to 997 body kit’ for £1,995. Alternatively, for something a little more mainstream, how about a ‘Vauxhall Corsa D to VXR body kit’ for £550?

We’re not entirely sure what these replicas are trying to achieve. Those that don’t know, probably don’t care, while those that do know will probably mutter some obscenities under their breath.

On the one hand, this is better than slapping a few Ferrari badges on a Toyota MR2, as at least the base car rolled out of a factory in Stuttgart. But we’d rather rustle up a further £10,000 and drive home in a brand new Porsche 718 Cayman.

As for a brand new 911 GT3 RS: the Porsche website is listing the car at a recommended retail price of £131,296, but the ‘limited availability’ tag tells you all you need to know about your chances of finding one. Best get on the blower to AK Prestige Cars of Sheffield.

View the ad here.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Porsche fan wins claim after dealer sells ‘his’ 911 GT3 RS

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

When Kevin Hughes put down a £10,000 deposit on a last-of-the-line Porsche 911 GT3 RS, he believed he was the first in the queue.

Unfortunately for Mr Hughes, the Porsche Centre in Bolton sold the hardcore Porsche to a customer further down the waiting list, shattering his dreams of owning one of the 30 cars allocated to the UK.

Porsche ceased production of the 997 GT3 RS in 2011, building a total of 600 units, each one costing just shy of £130,000. Mr Hughes – the owner of a classic car restoration business – used part of his pension to secure the super-rare Porsche and was told he would be “first in the queue” if the dealer was chosen to receive one of the 30 UK cars.

Porsche Centre Bolton was chosen to receive a car, but rather than contacting Mr Hughes with the good news, it chose to inform him no cars had been allocated, and his deposit was returned.

[bctt tweet=”It was ‘as plain as pikestaff’ that the two parties had a legally-binding contract.”]

Mr Hughes later discovered the act of dishonesty and took the dealership to court. At first, his claim was rejected, with the judge at the Preston County Court arguing Mr Hughes had made merely an “expression of interest” and that by having his deposit returned he had suffered no financial loss.

Undeterred, Mr Hughes took the matter to the Court of Appeal, where the judge ruled in his favour, awarding him £35,000 in damages. This figure is based on an estimate between the price he would have paid for the GT3 RS and the value of the car today.

The Porsche dealer’s parent company, Pendragon Sabre Ltd, has also been ordered to pay £50,000 towards Mr Hughes’ legal costs, but the final bill is likely to run into six figures. In summing up, the judge said it was “as plain as pikestaff” that the two parties had a legally-binding contract and that Mr Hughes had done more than “express an interest” in the highly sought-after Porsche.

It remains to be seen whether or not Mr Hughes will manage to secure a secondhand Porsche 911 GT3 RS. He could, of course, spend upwards of £131,296 on a 991 GT3 RS, but we doubt he’ll be visiting the Porsche Centre in Bolton any time soon.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Porsche fan wins claim after dealer sells 'his' 911 GT3 RS

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

When Kevin Hughes put down a £10,000 deposit on a last-of-the-line Porsche 911 GT3 RS, he believed he was the first in the queue.

Unfortunately for Mr Hughes, the Porsche Centre in Bolton sold the hardcore Porsche to a customer further down the waiting list, shattering his dreams of owning one of the 30 cars allocated to the UK.

Porsche ceased production of the 997 GT3 RS in 2011, building a total of 600 units, each one costing just shy of £130,000. Mr Hughes – the owner of a classic car restoration business – used part of his pension to secure the super-rare Porsche and was told he would be “first in the queue” if the dealer was chosen to receive one of the 30 UK cars.

Porsche Centre Bolton was chosen to receive a car, but rather than contacting Mr Hughes with the good news, it chose to inform him no cars had been allocated, and his deposit was returned.

[bctt tweet=”It was ‘as plain as pikestaff’ that the two parties had a legally-binding contract.”]

Mr Hughes later discovered the act of dishonesty and took the dealership to court. At first, his claim was rejected, with the judge at the Preston County Court arguing Mr Hughes had made merely an “expression of interest” and that by having his deposit returned he had suffered no financial loss.

Undeterred, Mr Hughes took the matter to the Court of Appeal, where the judge ruled in his favour, awarding him £35,000 in damages. This figure is based on an estimate between the price he would have paid for the GT3 RS and the value of the car today.

The Porsche dealer’s parent company, Pendragon Sabre Ltd, has also been ordered to pay £50,000 towards Mr Hughes’ legal costs, but the final bill is likely to run into six figures. In summing up, the judge said it was “as plain as pikestaff” that the two parties had a legally-binding contract and that Mr Hughes had done more than “express an interest” in the highly sought-after Porsche.

It remains to be seen whether or not Mr Hughes will manage to secure a secondhand Porsche 911 GT3 RS. He could, of course, spend upwards of £131,296 on a 991 GT3 RS, but we doubt he’ll be visiting the Porsche Centre in Bolton any time soon.