This is how you're supposed to use your fog lights

This is how you're supposed to use your fog lights

This is how you're supposed to use your fog lights

With freezing fog sweeping across the UK, now is a good time to get a clear understanding of how to be seen when visibility is at a premium.

It should go without saying, but when it’s foggy, put your headlights on. Automatic headlights don’t always detect fog in the same way as they do darkness, so make sure your headlights are switched on manually.

Now, you might ask if you need to use your fog lights. The answer, probably, is no – at least not straight away. Fog lights are there to be used proactively. You shouldn’t switch them on at the start of your journey and leave them on ‘just in case’ it gets a bit foggy.

So when should I switch my fog lights on?

So when should I switch my fog lights on?

If there are other cars around, use them as an indication of how poor visibility is. Can you see a car 100 metres (that’s roughly the length of a football pitch) in front, or coming towards you, without fog lights on?

If the answer is yes, and fairly clearly, you don’t need to use your fog lights.

If you find that you are struggling to see other traffic – particularly if you’re travelling on the motorway – then put your fog lights on. A good sign that you need to use your fog lights is that the fog is thick enough to cause you to slow down.

As soon as visibility clears, turn your fog lights off. If you’re travelling in traffic and there’s a car behind you who will be able to see you without your rear fog light on, turn it off.

What happens if I use my fog lights when I don’t need to?

Fog lights can dazzle other road users, while rear fog lights can obscure your brake lights. Driving with them on can actually be more dangerous than not using them at all, which is why it’s important to think carefully about whether they’re needed.

If a police officer sees you driving with your fog lights on when they’re not needed, you could be hit with a £50 fixed penalty notice at the side of the road.

How do I turn my fog lights on?

How do I turn my fog lights on?

By law, all cars built since 1986 must have at least one rear fog light. This will be operated using a switch with a symbol similar to those above.

Front fog lights aren’t a legal requirement, but many cars have them fitted as standard. In most cars, they can be switched on using the same stalk as the headlights, or by a button on the dashboard.

When on, you’ll see a warning symbol on your dash that looks like the above picture.

The one on the left indicates the car’s front fog lights are on, while the one on the right is informing you the rear fogs are lit.

Any other tips for driving in fog?

First of all, it’s usually beneficial not to use your main beam. While it might be tempting to flick it on to give a better view, in thick fog it’ll reflect and reduce visibility even more.

Drive slowly, and leave a bigger gap to other vehicles in case they have to stop suddenly for something you can’t see.

When you’re stopped, for example at traffic lights, keep your foot on the brake pedal so your brake lights are lit up, making you more visible to other traffic. When a car stops behind you, use your handbrake and remove your foot from the brake pedal to avoid dazzling the driver.

This is how you're supposed to use your fog lights

This is how you’re supposed to use your fog lights

This is how you're supposed to use your fog lights

With freezing fog sweeping across the UK, now is a good time to get a clear understanding of how to be seen when visibility is at a premium.

It should go without saying, but when it’s foggy, put your headlights on. Automatic headlights don’t always detect fog in the same way as they do darkness, so make sure your headlights are switched on manually.

Now, you might ask if you need to use your fog lights. The answer, probably, is no – at least not straight away. Fog lights are there to be used proactively. You shouldn’t switch them on at the start of your journey and leave them on ‘just in case’ it gets a bit foggy.

So when should I switch my fog lights on?

So when should I switch my fog lights on?

If there are other cars around, use them as an indication of how poor visibility is. Can you see a car 100 metres (that’s roughly the length of a football pitch) in front, or coming towards you, without fog lights on?

If the answer is yes, and fairly clearly, you don’t need to use your fog lights.

If you find that you are struggling to see other traffic – particularly if you’re travelling on the motorway – then put your fog lights on. A good sign that you need to use your fog lights is that the fog is thick enough to cause you to slow down.

As soon as visibility clears, turn your fog lights off. If you’re travelling in traffic and there’s a car behind you who will be able to see you without your rear fog light on, turn it off.

What happens if I use my fog lights when I don’t need to?

Fog lights can dazzle other road users, while rear fog lights can obscure your brake lights. Driving with them on can actually be more dangerous than not using them at all, which is why it’s important to think carefully about whether they’re needed.

If a police officer sees you driving with your fog lights on when they’re not needed, you could be hit with a £50 fixed penalty notice at the side of the road.

How do I turn my fog lights on?

How do I turn my fog lights on?

By law, all cars built since 1986 must have at least one rear fog light. This will be operated using a switch with a symbol similar to those above.

Front fog lights aren’t a legal requirement, but many cars have them fitted as standard. In most cars, they can be switched on using the same stalk as the headlights, or by a button on the dashboard.

When on, you’ll see a warning symbol on your dash that looks like the above picture.

The one on the left indicates the car’s front fog lights are on, while the one on the right is informing you the rear fogs are lit.

Any other tips for driving in fog?

First of all, it’s usually beneficial not to use your main beam. While it might be tempting to flick it on to give a better view, in thick fog it’ll reflect and reduce visibility even more.

Drive slowly, and leave a bigger gap to other vehicles in case they have to stop suddenly for something you can’t see.

When you’re stopped, for example at traffic lights, keep your foot on the brake pedal so your brake lights are lit up, making you more visible to other traffic. When a car stops behind you, use your handbrake and remove your foot from the brake pedal to avoid dazzling the driver.

Video: Ford Mustang two-star Euro NCAP crash test

Euro NCAP slams new Ford Mustang in 2017 safety crash testing

Ford Mustang slammed for two star Euro NCAP crash test

Ford Mustang slammed for two star Euro NCAP crash test

Ford Mustang slammed for two star Euro NCAP crash test

The Ford Mustang has become the first car from a mainstream car manufacturer to be given a two-star Euro NCAP safety rating since 2008.

Thatcham, the company that oversees the official NCAP crash test, has criticised Ford for selling the Mustang in the UK without important safety technology that’s available in the USA.

Video: Ford Mustang Euro NCAP crash test

“Ford has made a deliberate choice,” explains Thatcham Research’s director of research, Matthew Avery.

“The car has been designed to score well in less wide-ranging US consumer safety tests and only minor updates have been made to meet required European (pedestrian) safety regulations.

“This has resulted in poor adult and child protection scores and the high-tech radar collision warning system that is available to US consumers not being available here in the UK. The two-star Euro NCAP rating is the consequence.”

During the test, the driver and passenger airbags failed to inflate sufficiently in an offset front collision.

In the full-width front impact test, a rear passenger was found to slide under their seatbelt. Rear seatbelt pre-tensioners and load-limiters would prevent this, Thatcham says.

Ford Mustang slammed for two star Euro NCAP safety rating.

A facelift for the Mustang, due to go on sale in September 2017, will have extra safety technology as standard, Ford says, including pre-collision assist and lane-keep assist. This could result in a higher NCAP score when re-tested.

“This really bucks the trend,” adds Avery. “Car buyers are increasingly benefiting from improved safety functionality and features, and this applies equally to cars in the sports roadster category as to family cars.

“We have concerns about the Ford Mustang’s crash protection of adults and children which also makes it unsuitable for having rear passengers. On top this, it does not have basic life-saving technology like autonomous emergency braking that is available even on the Ford Fiesta, and the recently-launched Ford Edge.”

Ford has hit back, telling Motoring Research the Mustang is “fundamentally a safe car,” achieving five stars for pedestrian safety, four for front occupants and three for child occupants. Despite this, a spokesman admitted they found the overall result “disappointing”.

NCAP has also tested the new Volvo S90 and V90 – both of which have been awarded five stars and praised for their “class-leading safety”.

“It does make you wonder if anything rubbed off on Ford from the Volvo/Ford partnership,” concludes Avery.

Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017Forget Brexit, the big news in Europe this week is the announcement of this year’s European Car of the Year finalists. Seven cars have made the shortlist, and it won’t take a Supreme Court ruling to name the winner.

The magnificent seven will undergo a series of tests in February, before the winner is revealed at the Geneva Motor Show in March. Which car will steal the crown from the Vauxhall Astra? Read on to discover the runners and riders.

Alfa Romeo GiuliaRevealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

The last Alfa Romeo to be named European Car of the Year was the 147 in 2001. Sure, the 159 finished third in 2006 and the Giulietta finished a close second in 2011, but it’s been a while since an Alfa finished top of the tree. Does the Giulia stand a chance?

If the 58 jury members have an ounce of petrol running through their veins, the Alfa Romeo Giulia is in with a shout. It’s another ‘last chance saloon’ for the brand, only this one has a genuine opportunity to ruffle a few feathers in Germany. Hang on, haven’t we heard that before?

Citroen C3Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

Oh how Citroen needs the C3 to succeed. Full year 2016 registrations were down 3% in its native France, a stark contrast to the 7% and 3% increase enjoyed by Renault and Peugeot, respectively. The outgoing C3 remained Citroen’s best-seller, but registrations were down 7%.

Citroen has played a canny card with the new C3. Its chunky styling – complete with C4 Cactus style Airbumps – gives it the look of a crossover, while the innovative ConnectedCAM is likely to appeal to younger, tech-savvy audience.

Mercedes-Benz E-ClassRevealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

The only German car to make the cut just happens to be one of the best new cars of the past 12 months. There’s a Mercedes-Benz E-Class to suit all tastes, from the standard saloon through to the forthcoming All-Terrain estate.

If the E-Class wins the award, it will be the first time a Mercedes-Benz has worn the crown since 1974, when the 450SE beat the Fiat X1/9 and Honda Civic into second and third place, respectively. More recently, the C-Class finished third in 2015.

Nissan MicraRevealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

In 1993, the Nissan Micra K11 was named European Car of the Year. A lot of water has passed under the bridge since then, as the Micra evolved into a shadow of its former self. The fifth generation K14 was unveiled at the 2016 Paris Motor Show and it represents a radical change of direction for the Micra.

Not only does the new Micra look good – like, properly good – it also features a smart interior and is no longer likely to send drivers into a coma. Prices start from £11,995 and Nissan claims you can choose from over 100 different style configurations.

Peugeot 3008Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

Is this the greatest transformation since Claudio Ranieri turned Leicester City from relegation fodder into Premier League winners? Gone is the frumpy 3008 of old, replaced by something altogether more funky.

Peugeot claims the 3008 is “potentially the most trendy SUV currently on the market”, helped in no small part by the brilliant interior. Good enough for the 3008 to follow in the footsteps of the 504, 405, 307 and 308 by winning the award? We’ll see.

Toyota C-HRRevealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

According to Toyota Japan, the C-HR name is derived from ‘Compact High Rider’ and ‘Cross Hatch Run-about’, while Toyota GB claims it stands for ‘Coupe High Rider’. Whatever, the C-HR is one of the sharpest looking cars of recent years. Compare and contrast with the likes of the Auris, Avensis and Verso.

In an effort to tempt buyers out of the Nissan Qashqai and SEAT Ateca, Toyota has loaded the C-HR with generous levels of standard kit and is offering an efficient hybrid version for company car drivers. It’s not the most practical car in its segment, but it’s arguably the most interesting.

Volvo S90/V90Revealed: the European Car of the Year finalists of 2017

Volvo has never lifted the European Car of the Year trophy, although the XC90 came pretty close in 2016. If the award is based on interior ambience and a sense of calm, the Volvo S90 and V90 are in with a good shout.

Later this year, the V90 will be joined by a new, high-riding Cross Country version, set to go head-to-head with the new E-Class All-Terrain. Fans of jacked-up estate cars have never had it so good. Which car will be named European Car of the Year? Find out on March 6, 2017.

Driving to France? You're risking a £117 fine if you don't display this sticker

Driving to France? You’re risking a £117 fine if you don’t display this sticker

Driving to France? You're risking a £117 fine if you don't display this sticker

A new emissions system being introduced in cities across France could see British drivers hit with fines of up to £117 if they don’t display a special sticker that can be bought for just £3.20.

The Crit’Air vignette was introduced in Lyon and Grenoble on 1 January, with Paris following on Sunday 22 January.

It puts vehicles into six categories based on their emissions: from the cleanest electric or hydrogen-powered cars (Crit’Air 1), to the dirtiest (Crit’Air 6). The categories correspond to the six European Union emission standards for cars – dating back to 1992 when Euro 1 was introduced.

Drivers in Paris failing to display a sticker could be hit with an on-the-spot fine of between €68-135 (£58 to £117).

There’s a catch, though – the website where you can buy the vignette is only available in French, making it difficult for British holidaymakers to comply with the regulations. An English language website is expected in the near future.

The RAC’s European breakdown spokesman Simon Williams said: “Anyone caught without a sticker risks a fine of up to £117, although we understand the French police are likely to be lenient in the early days.”

If you’re expecting to drive through Grenoble, Lyon or Paris you’ll need to know the European emissions standard of your vehicle to apply for the sticker. If your car is a modern Euro 5 or 6 standard vehicle (including all cars registered since September 2009), you’ll be able to find its category in section D2 of the V5.

The ultimate aim is to ban the highest emitting vehicles from cities across France – particularly on days where pollution is particularly high.

Vehicles that are too old to be given a vignette (including cars registered before 1997) are already banned from being driven in Paris between 8am on 8pm on weekdays.

Driving to France? You're risking a £117 fine if you don't display this sticker

Driving to France? You're risking a £117 fine if you don't display this sticker

Driving to France? You're risking a £117 fine if you don't display this sticker

A new emissions system being introduced in cities across France could see British drivers hit with fines of up to £117 if they don’t display a special sticker that can be bought for just £3.20.

The Crit’Air vignette was introduced in Lyon and Grenoble on 1 January, with Paris following on Sunday 22 January.

It puts vehicles into six categories based on their emissions: from the cleanest electric or hydrogen-powered cars (Crit’Air 1), to the dirtiest (Crit’Air 6). The categories correspond to the six European Union emission standards for cars – dating back to 1992 when Euro 1 was introduced.

Drivers in Paris failing to display a sticker could be hit with an on-the-spot fine of between €68-135 (£58 to £117).

There’s a catch, though – the website where you can buy the vignette is only available in French, making it difficult for British holidaymakers to comply with the regulations. An English language website is expected in the near future.

The RAC’s European breakdown spokesman Simon Williams said: “Anyone caught without a sticker risks a fine of up to £117, although we understand the French police are likely to be lenient in the early days.”

If you’re expecting to drive through Grenoble, Lyon or Paris you’ll need to know the European emissions standard of your vehicle to apply for the sticker. If your car is a modern Euro 5 or 6 standard vehicle (including all cars registered since September 2009), you’ll be able to find its category in section D2 of the V5.

The ultimate aim is to ban the highest emitting vehicles from cities across France – particularly on days where pollution is particularly high.

Vehicles that are too old to be given a vignette (including cars registered before 1997) are already banned from being driven in Paris between 8am on 8pm on weekdays.

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi's fortunes?

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi's fortunes?

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi's fortunes?

Mitsubishi has teased a new SUV ahead of its reveal at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show – and hinted that it could be a ‘turning point’ for the brand in the UK.

The Qashqai-sized crossover is rumoured to be named the Eclipse and will sit between the ASX and the Outlander in the company’s range.

The Japanese carmaker saw UK registrations plummet in 2016 – down nearly 20% to 18,237 sales last year. In recent years it’s been relying on sales of its popular Outlander PHEV crossover, which has been hit by reduced government incentives for plug-in hybrid cars.

Mitsubishi teased the new crossover in concept form as the XR-PHEV II at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show.

At the time, Mitsubishi UK’s managing director Lance Bradley told Motoring Research it had potential to double the manufacturer’s sales figures in the UK.

He explained that, in 2015, Mitsubishi UK was expecting to sell 10,000 Outlander PHEVs. As the C-segment crossover sector is three times larger than the D-segment SUV, the firm could potentially sell 30,000 Qashqai-rivals a year.

“I’m not saying that’s going to happen,” Bradley told Motoring Research. “We’re going to be conservative in our numbers. But when I went to Japan, Aikawa [former president and chief operating officer of Mitsubishi Motors Corporation] ambitiously suggested that it might be possible.”

The new crossover will use a shortened version of the Outlander’s platform and will feature a more stylish, coupe roofline.

Although a plug-in hybrid version would appear to make sense following the success of the Outlander PHEV, reduced incentives and high costs mean the firm might stick to more conventional powertrains for the Eclipse.

A new 1.5-litre turbocharged petrol engine is expected to be popular, while a 2.2-litre turbodiesel will also be offered. The SUV will be available with two- and four-wheel-drive powertrains.

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi's fortunes?

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi’s fortunes?

Could this Qashqai-sized SUV save Mitsubishi's fortunes?

Mitsubishi has teased a new SUV ahead of its reveal at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show – and hinted that it could be a ‘turning point’ for the brand in the UK.

The Qashqai-sized crossover is rumoured to be named the Eclipse and will sit between the ASX and the Outlander in the company’s range.

The Japanese carmaker saw UK registrations plummet in 2016 – down nearly 20% to 18,237 sales last year. In recent years it’s been relying on sales of its popular Outlander PHEV crossover, which has been hit by reduced government incentives for plug-in hybrid cars.

Mitsubishi teased the new crossover in concept form as the XR-PHEV II at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show.

At the time, Mitsubishi UK’s managing director Lance Bradley told Motoring Research it had potential to double the manufacturer’s sales figures in the UK.

He explained that, in 2015, Mitsubishi UK was expecting to sell 10,000 Outlander PHEVs. As the C-segment crossover sector is three times larger than the D-segment SUV, the firm could potentially sell 30,000 Qashqai-rivals a year.

“I’m not saying that’s going to happen,” Bradley told Motoring Research. “We’re going to be conservative in our numbers. But when I went to Japan, Aikawa [former president and chief operating officer of Mitsubishi Motors Corporation] ambitiously suggested that it might be possible.”

The new crossover will use a shortened version of the Outlander’s platform and will feature a more stylish, coupe roofline.

Although a plug-in hybrid version would appear to make sense following the success of the Outlander PHEV, reduced incentives and high costs mean the firm might stick to more conventional powertrains for the Eclipse.

A new 1.5-litre turbocharged petrol engine is expected to be popular, while a 2.2-litre turbodiesel will also be offered. The SUV will be available with two- and four-wheel-drive powertrains.

Volvo XC40

2018 Volvo XC40 first drive: watch out, Jaguar E-Pace

Volvo XC40Volvo is relevant. That’s the news that’s been coming out of the Chinese-owned Swedish car brand over the past few years. First, there was the brilliant XC90, which we said was good enough to take on the Range Rover. Then there was the smaller XC60 – not quite as convincing, but still a genuine rival to the BMW X3 and Audi Q5.

And now there’s this: the new XC40. A small, fashionable SUV, underpinned by a new Compact Modular Architecture (CMA) platform that, frankly, has the potential to make a mockery of the new Jaguar E-Pace.

First impressionsVolvo XC40

Why do we say that? Well, look at it. “Expressive Scandinavian design,” is how Volvo describes it. We call it the most attractive compact premium SUV on the market. To our eyes, anyway. It’s blockier than the bigger SUVs – and thus almost a nod to its past. Volvo has never really been above curves, while a rear end that’s wider than the front gives it an almost aggressive look. ‘Almost’, because we can’t really describe this baby Volvo SUV as ‘aggressive’.

It manages to have a clear family resemblance to the XC60 and XC90, without simply looking like a shrunken-down version. Volvo is keen to stress that it’s definitely an SUV, and not a crossover – possibly to leave room in the range for a Cross Country version of the new V40, which is due to arrive in 2018. With 211mm of ground clearance, it sits higher than the Audi Q3, Jaguar E-Pace and BMW X1, which adds to its bold look.Volvo XC40

Before we go any further, let’s pick apart the prices. The entry-level T3 petrol engine paired with front-wheel drive starts at £27,905 in Momentum trim, making it just as expensive as its German rivals. There’s a good amount of kit as standard, though: all models feature the ‘Thor’s hammer’ LED lights, a nine-inch infotainment screen (we’ll come to that shortly), rear park-assist and Volvo’s City Safety automatic braking system.

Although finance deals are yet to be announced, strong residual values (43% after three years for a D3 manual Momentum, says CAP HPI) mean it ought to be fairly competitive on PCP.Volvo XC40

Volvo’s launching a new subscription service with the XC40, too. At £629 per month and restricted to customers within the M25 to start with, Care by Volvo is not going to drastically change how we buy cars from the off, but it’s interesting nonetheless. There’s no deposit, the contract lasts 24 months, and everything but fuel is included – including insurance, tax and maintenance. For up to 14 days each year, you can even swap your XC40 for another Volvo in the range. Perfect if you wish to upgrade to an XC90 for a family holiday, for example.

First seatVolvo XC40

Just as the Volvo XC40 is refreshingly different from its rivals on the outside, it’s more of the same on the inside – in a good way. It’s not quite as plush as the XC60 and XC90 (you can’t expect that in a compact SUV that’s essentially half the price of an XC90), but it still feels premium and interesting in a ‘definitely not German’ kind of way.

All models come with Volvo’s portrait-oriented touchscreen infotainment screen in the centre of the dash, which replaces conventional buttons such as heating and radio controls. It does an excellent job of decluttering, but does make things unnecessarily complicated when driving. We’re sure with time you’d get used to accessing functions though the screen, though.Volvo XC40

There are lots of clever touches, too. There is bags of storage space, with huge door bins, a compartment underneath the front seats that can fit a tablet (or, if you’re feeling old-school, a road map), and a clever fold-out curry hook in the glove box. There’s even a little bin for keeping the footwells clear of used parking tickets and the like.

With 460 litres of boot space with the rear seats left up, it’s competitive, if not class-leading, compared to rivals. The load floor does lift to provide more space, though, and can be folded to help transport tricky items. The seats fold entirely flat at the touch of the button, should you wish to carry larger objects.Volvo XC40

There’s plenty of space for passengers, too. A couple of adults will sit in the rear without any major complaints in the head- or legroom department. It might be worth taking small children on the test-drive, though, as the car’s angular window line might make it difficult for them to see out of the back.

First driveVolvo XC40

Finally, an area in which we can be a bit critical. The XC40 is somewhat anodyne to drive. Only the higher-spec T5 petrol and D4 diesel were available on the launch, and even the 247hp petrol T5 – which sounds moderately exciting on paper – can’t rival the likes of Jag’s E-Pace for driver involvement. The steering is light, feedback not forthcoming, and you’re never going to get a buzz from driving the XC40 enthusiastically.

But, frankly, who cares? This car isn’t about being sporty. It’ll roll around in bends, but its four-wheel-drive system (standard on the D4 and T5) means it always feels secure. Driving the XC40 is a soothing experience, whether you’re threading it through city streets or sitting on the motorway. The eight-speed automatic gearbox (again, standard on the D4 and T5) is fast to respond, while very little noise makes its way into the cabin. Well, unless you start being rough with the accelerator pedal or make the mistake of putting the car in Dynamic mode.Volvo XC40

In reality, it’s the diesel that makes the most sense in this car. It’s so refined that we’d struggle to recommend the petrol, even in the current anti-diesel climate.

Ride quality is excellent, even in T5 R-Design guise with firmer dampers and 20-inch alloy wheels. In Momentum spec, on smaller wheels, it errs on the side of floaty, but not uncomfortably so. We’d be interested to try it on smaller wheels and on UK roads, though.

First verdictVolvo XC40

That brings us on to the usual caveats: these initial impressions are based on a day driving a left-hand-drive model on Spanish roads, and we’re yet to spend any time with an XC40 in the UK. It’s worth noting too that the D3 diesel with front-wheel drive, the model Volvo’s expecting to be the biggest seller in the UK, wasn’t available to try on the launch. But, cards on the table, this is the first compact SUV to get us this excited in a long time.

And that’s not because it’s exciting to drive. It’s not, but it is easy and relaxing and, in 2017, that’s more important than being fun. Especially in a car of this size and shape. It looks the absolute business, in our opinion, and the interior is brilliantly Swedish. Volvo’s radically-changing image is one that will appeal to some customers more than, say, BMW and Audi, too. The days of dull estates are long gone.

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Star rating verdict: ★★★★★

Five rivals

  • Audi Q3
  • BMW X1
  • Jaguar E-Pace
  • Mercedes-Benz GLA
  • Lexus NX

>NEXT: 2018 Jaguar E-Pace 2.0D 180 first drive: Jag’s hot hatch SUV