SEAT Leon Italian Police

Do you know the number to ring in an emergency in the EU?

SEAT Leon Italian PoliceSix million Brits will be, once past Calais, driving abroad to Europe this summer – but the RAC has discovered almost two in three of them don’t know the three-digit number to dial in an emergency.

Knowledge of the correct number – 112 – is ‘worryingly’ low, which could lead to difficulties in an accident.

RAC European breakdown operations manager David Huggon said: “We all recognise 999 as the main emergency phone number in the UK, but it appears that once we’ve left the country we leave our knowledge of who to ring in an emergency behind too.”

10% of motorists say they would dial 111 in an emergency when in Europe: that’s the UK NHS non-emergency line.

6% say they would dial 911, the emergency number in the United States and Canada, while 5% would call 101, the UK non-emergency police line.

Indeed, it’s the introduction of 101 and 111 phone numbers in the UK that might be why motorists are getting confused, reckons Huggon.

112 for the EU

Simply try to remember 112 is Huggon’s advice. “The 112 number works right across the EU, including the UK.

“But it doesn’t get a lot of promotion – certainly not in Britain, where we have 999 anyway, but not a great deal in continental Europe either, although electronic motorway signage in some countries including France is used to remind drivers.”

But won’t they speak a foreign language? Not at all. “Drivers need not be concerned about language barriers either, as in many cases dialling 112 will put you through to an English-speaking call handler while abroad.”

Emergency numbers – the RAC guide

Phone numberWhat it’s forWhere it works
112Emergency assistance lineAll of the European Union
999Emergency assistance lineUnited Kingdom
911Emergency assistance lineAll of North America
101Police non-emergency assistance lineUnited Kingdom
111NHS non-emergency assistance lineEngland and Scotland, and Wales from October 2015

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Nissan Juke-R 2.0

Nissan Juke-R 2.0 review: 2015 first drive

Nissan Juke-R 2.0‘What do you get if you put a Nissan GT-R engine in a Nissan Juke’ was a beyond-your-wildest-dreams question that nobody asked, but which Nissan answered back in 2012 with the Juke-R. No joke: it was a GT-R-Juke.

Engineered and built by crack British race team RML, it went on to tour the world and wow millions with its surprisingly accomplished (and largely sideways and smokey) talents. Nissan may love its EVs but with this, it also created a ‘hybrid’, one that’s done wonders for the brand.

Then, in 2014, the Juke was facelifted, getting sparkly new LED headlights, a new grille and much-needed extra boot space. So that was that for the pre-facelift Juke-R? Not a bit. Since then, it’s been back to work for the RML boys.

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

At the 2015 Goodwood Festival of Speed, their efforts were revealed – the Nissan Juke-R 2.0, or the facelifted version of Nissan’s wildest car on sale. Present and correct is the new LED-equipped front and rear styling, along with new bumpers now made fully from carbon fibre.

The front bumper has 100% bigger cooling apertures, and for good reason; Nissan has bumped the power of the GT-R engine up to a Nismo-matching 600hp. Truly astonishing. It has also sweated on the detail of the bodywork, so it’s smoother and better integrated, while the wheels are all-new GT-R rims.

Note how we said ‘on sale’? Yes, you can actually buy a road-going Juke-R 2.0. Provided you have £406,000 to spare. You would get stopped everywhere by people (and the police) swearing blind it couldn’t ever be road-legal, so wild is it. Reason enough to want one – but, as we discovered, it’s also pretty handy to drive, too…

2015 Nissan Juke-R 2.0: On the road

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

You step past a huge roll cage to enter the Juke-R 2.0, getting into full-race buckets with four-point harnesses. Do them up and you won’t reach the door to close it. With a fantastic dash mix of Juke shapes and GT-R displays, the effect is not unlike sitting in a BTCC car. It’s the same silhouette, but thoroughly outfitted like a race car.

Unlike the GT-R, you sit really high, feeling like you’re towering over the road, yet the intrusive windscreen pillars make it tricky to see through corners. All this, plus the knowledge IT IS A JUKE WITH 600HP frankly terrifies you even before you start the 3.8-litre V8 twin-turbo engine sitting where a 1.5 diesel normally does.

It’s terror that barely diminishes. Just like the GT-R, Nissan’s 600hp Juke is ludicrously fast. We’re talking 0-62mph in three seconds here, with four-wheel-drive bite and fiendishly clever computers overseeing it all, ensuring the shock you get when you emerge from the Silverstone pit lane is total and absolute.

Tepid show car? Not a bit. Earlier, we’d been out in a ‘real’ GT-R Nismo and the electric similarities between Godzilla and its space monkey cousin were remarkable – particularly the staggering power and willingness to deploy it. You can barely paddle-change gear fast enough, and you certainly have to work the brakes hard to shed all the speed you’ve so quickly gained.

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

There are differences. The height and packaging limitations of the Juke platform mean it rolls more in corners, feels less anchored than the GT-R and, crucially, the shorter wheelbase makes it much livelier and more agile.

The latter is actually a good thing, in some ways, as you can actually turn into corners more sharply than in the big, heavy GT-R. The immediacy and bite is astounding. But, if you’re not quick enough, it will bite you; this is a hyper-responsive car that demands concentration. Given how much power it has, it’s worth bearing that in mind.

Speaking of power, the round boost that’s taken it up to 600hp? It’s made a car that was already a colossus of a performer even more mind-blowing. It reminded us of Ferraris Scuderia and Speciale – boy, you have to be good to use it properly. But boy, are the rewards there if you do.

This is why it’s so brilliant. What’s more, if you want to buy one, RML and Nissan will teach you how to drive it properly, to get the best from its race-tuned chassis. As unlikely as it sounds, this will make it one of the closest genuine road-going race car experiences you can get. A cult car that doesn’t disappoint behind the wheel – just as it should be.

2015 Nissan Juke-R 2.0: On the inside

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

Nissan’s quite proud of this bit. Because it does actually start life as a production-spec Juke, buyers can first choose the level of interior kit they’d like, and the trim colours for the dash and doors, before RML takes over and R 2.0’s the rest of it.

It means that functions such as climate control, auto headlights and fancy colour-matched trim lines are retained, surrounding the genuine GT-R dials, levers and displays within. Note that all those displays are fully functional as well – far from an easy job.

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

We’ve covered the obvious stuff like the fact you have a humongous roll cage surrounding you – it’s there to make the chassis as stiff as it is in the GT-R – and the fact visibility could be better. It’s hardly the car you’ll use to quickly nip to the shops.

For this reason, you should also have a standard Juke waiting in the wings. Or maybe a standard GT-R. But the very fact that such a race-engineered hybrid supercar such as this is road-legal and relatively practical is a real achievement. Just don’t think of it as a school-run squirtabout.

2015 Nissan Juke-R 2.0: Running costs

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

Hmm, where do we start? Perhaps best not to go here. The GT-R itself is hardly a cheap car to run. It’s very thirsty, has a hunger for tyres and servicing is both regular and, if you don’t have a Nissan service pack, ruinous by regular car standards.

The Juke-R 2.0 can only further up the ante, due to its scratch-built nature and race car ideals. You’ll have a bit of explaining to do with your insurance company and it’s not going to be one you’ll drop into your local Nissan dealer on a whim.

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

There are positives, though. Retained values for one. It may not be a star performer short-term but, in the long run, a cult car this wild can only spiral in value – particularly as Nissan has vowed to make no more than 23.

For most who’ll be buying it, though, all this is immaterial. They can afford any car in the world with ease – this will be brought for their collection and perhaps for occasional showboating. Running costs are simply not an issue.

2015 Nissan Juke-R 2.0: Verdict

Nissan Juke-R 2.0

The Nissan Juke-R 2.0 terrified us, wowed us, amazed us, and terrified us. Think they don’t make scary monster-cars like they did in the olden days? Think again. It looks brutally nuts, but rightly so. It is.

But if you’re good enough, it’s also usable explosive performance. Unlike other supermini supercars such as the old Renault Clio V6, RML has done a proper job engineering the Juke-R 2.0 as thoroughly as it would a race car, and it shows.

There’s many a supercar that doesn’t feel this special and outlandish to drive. Given the fact that you can actually buy one and drive it on the road despite it looking like a GT-racing wannabe, it’s hard not to be seduced by the Juke-R 2.0. Reputation: warranted.

2015 Nissan Juke-R 2.0: specifications

Engine: 3.8-litre V6 twin-turbo

Price: £406,000

Power: 600hp

Torque: TBA

0-62mph: TBA

Top speed: TBA

Fuel economy: TBA

CO2 emissions: TBA

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Top Gear trio Clarkson, Hammond and May confirmed for Amazon show

Top Gear trio Clarkson, Hammond and May confirmed for Amazon show

Top Gear trio Clarkson, Hammond and May confirmed for Amazon show

Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May have signed a deal with Amazon to appear on a new show set to rival Top Gear.

It’s thought that Amazon fought off competition from Netflix for the trio after Clarkson was sacked from the BBC for punching a producer.

This morning Jeremy Clarkson tweeted:

The programme will air in 2016 and will be produced by former Top Gear executive Andy Wilman.

The deal ends months of speculation about where the Top Gear trio would appear next – with Netflix, ITV and Sky all rumoured.

It’s not known how much the deal has cost Amazon – which is expected to show the new programme through its Amazon Prime service – but it’s thought the Top Gear threesome will be given free reign.

Amazon tweeted that it had signed the trio up for three series of the new car show, which won’t be called Top Gear or feature the Stig.

James May added:

It’s still not known who will present Top Gear on the BBC alongside Chris Evans. However, Jenson Button is the latest to be tipped.

London supercar dealer pleads against boy-racer crackdown

London supercar dealer pleads against boy-racer crackdown

London supercar dealer pleads against boy-racer crackdown

The founder of a central London supercar dealership has begged with Kensington and Chelsea council not to ‘demonise supercars’ in a move he’s branded ‘using the proverbial sledgehammer to crack a nut’.

During the summer months wealthy areas of central London see an influx of visitors from the Middle East arriving to stay in their London properties – and often bringing expensive supercars with them.

But locals complain that they drive in an anti-social manner, revving engines late at night, accelerating quickly and driving in convoy.

To combat this, Kensington and Chelsea council has proposed legislation set to curb ‘excessive levels of noise, nuisance, annoyance, danger or risk of harm or injury caused by motor vehicles to members of the public and property in the area’.

It’s called the Public Spaces Protection order, or PSPO.

‘ASBO for supercars’

Described as an anti-social behaviour order (ASBO) for motor vehicles, the public spaces protection order could give police powers to dish out fines for anyone causing a scene in their car in the central London district.

But the founder of Prindiville, a specialist supercar dealer in central London, has said existing laws are perfectly adequate and common sense needs to prevail.

Prindiville founder Alex Prindiville said: “While I can fully sympathise with local residents who are upset by the anti-social behaviour of the few, the proposed terms of the PSPO are an excessive response – forbidden will be playing music loudly in your car, travelling in convoy, revving your engine, letting your engine idle, causing either a stationary or moving obstruction, sounding your horn, accelerating rapidly, and a few more things besides.

“If I were to go shopping at Harrods in the Ferrari LaFerrari currently in the Prindiville showroom and when I started it up it revved loudly – which it would because that’s simply what happens with supercars like these, whether you like it or not – would I be arrested and have my car impounded?”

Prendiville added that the wealthy supercar owners are no different to boy racers across the country.

He said: “I don’t doubt that some of the young Arabs in their powerful supercars do cause a genuine nuisance, but apart from the price of their cars, are the rest of them so very different from young lads the length and breadth of this country? Existing police powers will sort out the troublemakers in Newcastle or Birmingham, Bristol or Brighton, so why does Kensington and Chelsea require anything extra?”

Do you agree that the proposed regulations are excessive? Or is a heavy hand needed to combat this anti-social behaviour? Comment below or tweet us @editorial_MR.

Experts call for driving to be added to the school curriculum

Experts call for driving to be added to the school curriculum

Experts call for driving to be added to the school curriculum

Motoring organisations are supporting a petition for the government to add driving to the school curriculum in a bid to cut the number of road accidents involving young drivers.

Set up by Young Driver, provider of driving lessons for under 17s, the petition calls for practical and classroom-based driving lessons to be added to the national curriculum.

The company says its petition, which doesn’t call for a change in the driving age, already has the support of organisations including the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) and the RAC, as well as insurance companies and motoring expert Quentin Willson.

One in five new drivers have a crash within six months of passing their test and road traffic accidents account for a quarter of the deaths of 15-19 year olds in the UK, compared to just 0.5% of the overall adult population. Every year 400 people are killed in accidents involving young drivers.

Willson said: “Both my son, age 16, and daughter, age 11, have started having driving lessons with Young Driver. I think it’s vital – it’s a road safety revolution in the making.

“If we could get this on the curriculum, so the opportunity was open to all, it would have huge ramifications in terms of the safety of our young people. And, as both a father and road user, that’s certainly something I want to back. Getting 100,000 signatures could help save 400 precious lives every year.”

If the petition reaches 10,000 signatures, the government will issue an official response – while 100,000 signatures could see it debated in Parliament.

741-mile Austin Metro to be auctioned at CarFest South

741-mile Austin Metro to be auctioned at CarFest South

741-mile Austin Metro to be auctioned at CarFest South

An Austin Metro Vanden Plas 500 described as being in ‘brand new’ condition is to be auctioned at CarFest South next month.

With just 741 miles on its clock, A500 VOJ is thought to have spent the first part of its life in Birmingham’s Patrick Collection.

Despite showing just one owner on its logbook, the Metro is believed to have been bought from the collection by a classic car enthusiast, and has spent most of its life in his garage.

When advertised last year for offers around £7,000, seller John Hill, told Classic Cars For Sale: “I bought it off a collector, and the idea was that I would keep it for my nephew. The plan was to give it to him as a present whenever he learned to drive, but now the time has come he doesn’t want his mates to see him driving around in a Metro. He’d rather have a Ferrari instead!

“The car has always been kept under wraps in dry storage since it was new – it is basically a brand new Metro, and you’ll never find another one quite like it.”

The car was the second Vanden Plas 500 to be registered – and thought to be one of just five remaining. One of the most luxurious Metros ever produced, the Vanden Plas 500 featured tan leather seats and alloy wheels.

Motoring Research understands that Hill sold the Metro to another collector who is now offering it for auction at CarFest South.

Classic Car Auctions general manager Guy Lees-Milne said: “It’s a delight to be offering such a special British icon in our sale at CarFest. This is a unique opportunity to own an incredibly rare car, at no reserve, and this example is one to potentially bubble-wrap for the future.”

The Austin Metro was one of the most popular car on Britain’s roads, with 1.3 million sold by 1994. Only around 500 are believed to be registered in the UK today – with one recently added to the MR Fleet.

Calais chaos: what to do if you're travelling to France

Calais chaos: what to do if you're travelling to France

Calais chaos: what to do if you're travelling to France

With school summer holidays now in progress, many of us will be planning to head into Europe via ferry or the Channel Tunnel.

But strike action by ferry workers and attempts by migrants to illegally cross the channel means it can be a daunting situation for British holidaymakers.

What should I do if I’m travelling to Calais?

  • Check with your ferry operator or Eurotunnel before travelling. Most will update their website and social media channels with the latest information on crossings.
  • Turn on the radio. As you get closer to Dover, tune into local radio stations for the latest on the situation.
  • Leave plenty of time. Operation Stack combined with a large amount of holiday traffic means routes to Dover and the port itself can be heavily congested.
  • Sections of the M20 are closed due to Operation Stack. Tourist traffic should find an alternative route – consider the M2 and A2 from the M25.
  • Consider a different crossing. Although Dover-Calais is the shortest crossing, others may prove easier. For example, ferries operate from Portsmouth to Le Havre, Caen and Cherbourg.

What should I do if I’m travelling from Calais?

  • Be prepared for migrant activity. Thousands of migrants are attempting to cross the channel. They’re mainly targeting lorries, but keep your doors locked and try to avoid stopping. Be particularly vigilant if you have a caravan.
  • Consider a different crossing. The Department for Transport has provided this map of routes between France and the UK.
  • Leave plenty of time and contact Eurotunnel or your ferry operator if you’re worried about cancellations.
  • If you require assistance, dial 112 in France for the emergency services or 00 33 (0)1 44 51 31 00 for the British Embassy.

What is the British Government doing about it?

The UK has pledged £7m to improve security at Calais, including new fencing around tunnel and ferry terminals.

Prime minister David Cameron said: “I have every sympathy with holidaymakers who are finding access to Calais difficult because of the disturbances there and we will do everything we can to work with the French to bring these things to a conclusion.

“There’s no point trying to point fingers of blame, it’s about working with the French, putting in place these additional security measures, adding in the investment where that’s needed – Britain will always come forward with that.”

Home secretary Theresa May is holding an emergency Cobra meeting this morning following news that a migrant has died after being struck by a lorry while attempting to enter the channel tunnel.

MORE on MR

  • Operation Stack truckers given free water by council
  • £12 million in fines for truckers carrying stowaways
  • The best travel apps for your summer holidays
Calais chaos: what to do if you're travelling to France

Calais chaos: what to do if you’re travelling to France

Calais chaos: what to do if you're travelling to France

With school summer holidays now in progress, many of us will be planning to head into Europe via ferry or the Channel Tunnel.

But strike action by ferry workers and attempts by migrants to illegally cross the channel means it can be a daunting situation for British holidaymakers.

What should I do if I’m travelling to Calais?

  • Check with your ferry operator or Eurotunnel before travelling. Most will update their website and social media channels with the latest information on crossings.
  • Turn on the radio. As you get closer to Dover, tune into local radio stations for the latest on the situation.
  • Leave plenty of time. Operation Stack combined with a large amount of holiday traffic means routes to Dover and the port itself can be heavily congested.
  • Sections of the M20 are closed due to Operation Stack. Tourist traffic should find an alternative route – consider the M2 and A2 from the M25.
  • Consider a different crossing. Although Dover-Calais is the shortest crossing, others may prove easier. For example, ferries operate from Portsmouth to Le Havre, Caen and Cherbourg.

What should I do if I’m travelling from Calais?

  • Be prepared for migrant activity. Thousands of migrants are attempting to cross the channel. They’re mainly targeting lorries, but keep your doors locked and try to avoid stopping. Be particularly vigilant if you have a caravan.
  • Consider a different crossing. The Department for Transport has provided this map of routes between France and the UK.
  • Leave plenty of time and contact Eurotunnel or your ferry operator if you’re worried about cancellations.
  • If you require assistance, dial 112 in France for the emergency services or 00 33 (0)1 44 51 31 00 for the British Embassy.

What is the British Government doing about it?

The UK has pledged £7m to improve security at Calais, including new fencing around tunnel and ferry terminals.

Prime minister David Cameron said: “I have every sympathy with holidaymakers who are finding access to Calais difficult because of the disturbances there and we will do everything we can to work with the French to bring these things to a conclusion.

“There’s no point trying to point fingers of blame, it’s about working with the French, putting in place these additional security measures, adding in the investment where that’s needed – Britain will always come forward with that.”

Home secretary Theresa May is holding an emergency Cobra meeting this morning following news that a migrant has died after being struck by a lorry while attempting to enter the channel tunnel.

MORE on MR

  • Operation Stack truckers given free water by council
  • £12 million in fines for truckers carrying stowaways
  • The best travel apps for your summer holidays