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Yellowhammer: no deal could cause 60-hour delays for trucks

No deal brexit supply delay yellowhammer

The Road Haulage Association (RHA) has responded to the recent Yellowhammer report. The document contains the government’s worst-case-scenario predictions for a no-deal Brexit.

Yellowhammer ‘confirms the worst fears’ of the RHA. Delays at the border for trucks could last up to two-and-a-half days (60 hours).

The document also predicts that many UK businesses won’t be prepared for a no-deal departure.

No deal brexit supply delay yellowhammer

‘Public and business readiness for a no-deal will remain at a low level, and will decrease to lower levels’ the Yellowhammer report reads, ‘because the absence of a clear decision on the form of EU Exit (customs union, no deal, etc) does not provide a concrete situation for third parties to prepare for.’

No deal supply delay yellowhammer

“This is what we’ve been talking about for the last three years,” said RHA chief executive, Richard Burnett.

“We’ve been consistently warning that ‘no deal’ will mean disruption at the border and across the supply chain as firms get to grips with unfamiliar processes.

“An increase in energy from the government has been welcome, but it needs to throw all its weight into minimising the impact leaving the EU without a deal will have on the economy.”

No deal brexit supply delay yellowhammer

For UK automotive specifically, the biggest worry is parts availability. Dramatically slowed movement between the UK and EU could all but halt car production. Cars built in the UK and destined for the continent could also be significantly delayed. 

Then there are the increased tariffs and taxes that may be placed on exported cars once they get there. That goes for cars being imported from the EU, too.

Brexit fuel shortages in London

No deal supply delay yellowhammer

While supply is cited as being affected in general, the document specifically references the potential for fuel shortages in London. 

‘Regional traffic disruption caused by border delays could affect fuel distribution within the local area, particularly if traffic queues in Kent block the Dartford crossing, which would disrupt fuel supply in London and the south east.’

Eurotunnel makes ‘Brexit Promise’ for driving to France

Eurotunnel makes 'Brexit promise'

Eurotunnel is reassuring travellers that Brexit will not prevent them driving to France – at least in the short term. The message is that whatever happens, the tunnel will stay open.

On its ‘Brexit Promise’ page, it says ‘even in the case of a “no-deal” Brexit, the EU and UK have confirmed we’d continue to have visa-free travel this year and next.

‘Our Brexit promise gives you complete peace of mind, so you can make those holiday dreams reality, and secure the best fares today.’

As October 31 looms. prime minister Boris Johnson insists the UK will depart the EU on this date.

Eurotunnel makes 'Brexit promise'

Even your four-legged friends will be safe from the Brexit fallout. They’ll be allowed to accompany you on your travels as before.

Eurotunnel does warn of potential increased traffic outside the docks, though: 

‘Eurotunnel cannot control traffic flow outside of its terminals. However, we will continue to work with local authorities to ensure our customers are kept up to date.

‘In the unfortunate event of a build-up of traffic on the motorway which results in customers arriving late, we will as always endeavour to accommodate them on the next available shuttle.’

Eurotunnel makes 'Brexit promise'

Booking benefits also remain. These include free amendments up to 24 hours before your departure time, plus free cancellation up to seven days before you go.

‘Our shuttles will be running as usual throughout the year, whatever form Brexit takes,’ the site reads, in bold lettering.

Toyota car production will pause a day after Brexit

Toyota production to pause in the UK after Brexit

Toyota UK is hoping to mitigate supply issues that could arise immediately after Brexit by pausing car production for one day.

“We will have a production pause on the first day of Brexit, which is Friday 1st November 2019,” said a spokesman.

“Then we will restart production on the Monday and the Tuesday.”

Toyota Corolla

In spite of the closure, Toyota doesn’t expect any volume to be lost due to the factory’s down-time. 

It remains unclear exactly what the effects of Brexit – be it with a deal or not – will be.

“We don’t know what the actual situation will be like. We’ve already pulled forward a couple of days of extra inventory which we will then use on the Monday and Tuesday and we will have to see what the situation is after that,” continued the spokesman.

Toyota Corolla production in Burnaston

UK automotive has been one of the most critical sectors of Brexit, with the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) claiming that no deal with the EU would be like ‘death by a thousand cuts’ for homegrown industry.

A recent report has suggested that the total cost of a no-deal Brexit could top £4 billion per year.

Toyota Corolla production in Burnaston

Toyota production comprises eight percent of the 1.52 million cars built annually in Britain.

It commenced making its new Corolla at the Burnaston factory in Derbyshire this year.

No-deal Brexit could cost UK automotive £4 billion a year

No-deal brexit warnings

There have been more warnings come that a no-deal Brexit could hit the UK car industry hard, to the tune of £4 billion every year.

Costly challenges include the exporting of cars, parts supply and border controls. Just getting new cars built in the UK is predicted to be extremely challenging, according to a report by GlobalData.

No-deal brexit warnings

“A no-deal Brexit could lead to significant delays at borders as new customs checks are applied,” said Ian Henry, writer of the report, director of AutoAnalysis and visiting professor at Birmingham City University’s Centre for Brexit Studies.

“Those delays will cost manufacturers money due to lost time and necessitate the stockpiling of components as the Brexit deadline approaches.”

Parts stockpiling is necessary to minimise manufacturing disruption if the UK leaves without a deal. A circa. £700 million cost is expected to affect low volume manufacturers. Higher-volume car and LCV exports could suffer to the tune of £2.7 billion. 

“Regulatory alignment with the EU must be maintained if UK manufacturers wish to export their cars overseas,” continued Henry.

No-deal brexit warnings

“The UK Government may like to talk about the opportunities open to the UK economy after Brexit, but it is difficult to see what these are. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) has described Brexit’s impact on the automotive manufacturing industry as ‘like death by a thousand cuts’. It is very difficult to argue against this view.”

The associated costs with a no-deal Brexit are such that they wouldn’t long be contained by the automotive sector. The effects are expected to reach far beyond and “ripple through the value chain causing widespread economic and social disruption”.

How to get an International Driving Permit

International Driving Permit Brexit

As the 31 October Brexit deadline looms, the government has advised motorists to start thinking about what a no-deal departure means for us.

Essential for UK motorists driving in the EU will be an International Driving Permit (IDP). Don’t worry, though, they’re quite easy to get, but as demand has increased, the time it takes to get one has increased exponentially.

We touched on IDPs briefly in our top-to-bottom guide to post-Brexit driving – and do so in greater depth here.

What is an International Driving Permit?

International Driving Permit Brexit

An International Driving Permit allows you to drive in countries where your UK licence is not sufficient on its own.

In the past, these countries have included the USA, Japan and Brazil. From March onwards, however, especially in the case of a no-deal Brexit, the entire European Union could join that list.

Is an International Driving Permit necessary?

Just as you need a driving licence to drive in the UK, so you absolutely need an IDP overseas.

An IDP is currently required or recommended in more than 140 countries. The Post Office has a handy IDP checker tool that’s fully updated for post-March travel if a deal goes through. You can ask at your local Post Office for more information about what ‘no deal’ will mean.

How do I get an International Driving Permit?

International Driving Permit Brexit

Go to your nearest Post Office (that offers an IDP service) with your photocard driving licence and a passport photo in-hand, plus your passport for proof of identification if your driving licence is the old paper version.

It’ll cost you £5.50 per permit (you may need more than one) and shouldn’t take too long. You can see which permits are needed via the checker tool above.

UPDATE: IDP delays

During 2019, there have been delays reported in the acquisition of international driving permits. As the original Brexit leave date came and went, uncertainty has brewed over when we’d actually be leaving and whether it would be with a deal.

Yes, international driving permits are for if there is no deal, or at the very least if there are no provisions for UK drivers in the EU if a deal gets through. Nevertheless, there’s been a rush of people grabbing precautionary IDPs. Long queues and branch surfing has been reported, with some saying as many as 28 branches they visited were out of IDPs.

Others report stories of having to traverse London to find a branch with sufficient stock. Though the Post Office has allegedly taken steps to meet demand, delays are still being reported. 

What else will I need to drive in the EU?

If you are a UK passport holder living in the EU, you may need to re-take your driving test.

If you’re a UK resident who intends to drive in the EU, as well as your IDP(s) you will potentially need an insurance ‘green card’. Contact your insurance company to find out more. 

Which IDP do you need?

CountryIDPOther requirements
Albania1968 
Algeria1949 
Andorra1949 
Argentina1949 
Armenia1968 
Australia1949 
Austria1968If you have a photocard licence, you only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EUwithout a deal and your stay is over 6 months. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Azerbaijan1968 
Bahamas1968IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Bahrain1968IDP needed for car hire, and for stays longer than 90 days. You must get your permit certified by local authorities when you arrive.
Bangladesh1949 
Barbados1949 
Belarus1968 
Belgium1968You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and you stay is over 185 days.
Benin1949 
Bosnia and Herzegovina1968 
Botswana1949IDP needed for car hire.
Brazil1968You need to get a certified translation of your IDP from the British consulate.
Bulgaria1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
Burkina Faso1949 
Cambodia1949 
Canada1949 
Cape Verde1968 
Central African Republic1968 
Chile1949 
Congo1949 
Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast)1968 
Croatia1968 
Cuba1968 
Cyprus1949You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
Czech Republic1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
Democratic Republic of Congo1968 
Denmark1968You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and your stay is over 90 days.
Dominican Republic1949IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Ecuador1949 
Egypt1949 
Estonia1968You do not need an IDP to drive here. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you will need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Eswatini (previously Swaziland)1949If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. You may need to show an IDP to your insurance company if you’re involved in an accident.
Fiji1949 
FinlandNoneYou do not need an IDP to drive here. You will not need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
France1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
French Polynesia1968 
Georgia1968IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Germany1968If you have a photocard licence, you only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EUwithout a deal and your stay is over 6 months. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Ghana1949 
Greece1968You do not need an IDP to drive here. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you will need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Guam1949IDP needed for stays longer than 30 days. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. You may need to show an IDP to your insurance company if you’re involved in an accident.
Guatemala1949 
Guyana1968 
Haiti1949IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
 Hungary1968You do not need an IDP to drive here. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must also take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. If you have a paper licence, you will need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Iceland1949You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and your stay is over 1 month. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
India1949 
Iran1968 
Iraq1968 
Israel1968 
Italy1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
Jamaica1949 
Japan1949 
Jordan1949 
Kazakhstan1968 
Kenya1968IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Kuwait1968 
Kyrgyzstan1968 
Laos1949 
Latvia1968You do not need an IDP to drive here. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you will need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Lebanon1949 
Lesotho1949 
Liberia1968 
Libya1949 
Liechtenstein1926You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
Lithuania1968If you have a photocard licence, you only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EUwithout a deal and your stay is over 185 days. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Luxembourg1968You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and your stay is over 185 days.
Macao (Macau)1949 
Madagascar1949 
Malawi1949IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Malaysia (Sabah)1949 
Mali1949 
Malta1949You do not need an IDP to drive here. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you will need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Mexico1926 
Moldova1968 
Monaco1968 
Mongolia1968 
Montenegro1968 
Morocco1968 
Myanmar (previously Burma)1968 
Namibia1949IDP needed for car hire. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. You may need to show an IDP to your insurance company if you’re involved in an accident.
Netherlands1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
New Zealand1949 
Niger1968 
Nigeria1949You’ll need a 1968 permit instead to drive here on or after 18 October 2019.
North Macedonia1968 
Norway1968If you have a photocard licence, you only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EUwithout a deal and your stay is over 90 days. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Pakistan1968 
Papua New Guinea1949IDP needed for stays longer than 30 days.
Paraguay1949 
Peru1968 
Philippines1968IDP needed for car hire, and for stays longer than 90 days.
Poland1968If you have a photocard licence, you only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EUwithout a deal and your stay is over 185 days. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Portugal1968You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and your stay is over 185 days. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
Qatar1968 
Romania1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal. If you have an older, paper licence, you will need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, no matter how long you are staying.
Russian Federation1968 
Rwanda1949 
San Marino1968 
Saudi Arabia1968IDP needed for car hire.
Senegal1968 
Serbia1968 
Seychelles1968 
Sierra Leone1949 
Singapore1949IDP needed for car hire, and for stays longer than 30 days.
SlovakiaNoneYou do not need an IDP to drive here. You will not need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Slovenia1968You only need an IDP if the UK leaves the EU without a deal and your stay is over 90 days.
Somalia1926 
South Africa1968If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. You may need to show an IDP to your insurance company if you’re involved in an accident.
South Korea1949 
Spain (including Balearic and Canary Isles)1949If the UK leaves the EU without a deal on 31 October 2019, you’ll be able to drive here without an IDP until 31 July 2020. From 1 August 2020 onwards, you will need an IDP if you’re staying in Spain for more than 6 months. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport.
Sri Lanka1949As well as the IDP, you must get a Sri Lankan recognition permit from the Automobile Association of Ceylon (AAC) in Colombo.
St. Lucia1949Show your UK driving licence or IDP to the police to get a visitor’s licence.
St. Vincent1949Show your UK driving licence or IDP to the police to get a visitor’s licence.
Sweden1968You do not need an IDP unless the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
SwitzerlandNoneYou do not need an IDP to drive here. You will not need an IDP to drive here when the UK leaves the EU.
Syria1949 
Tajikistan1968 
Thailand1949 
Togo1949 
Trinidad & Tobago1949IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Tunisia1968 
Turkey1968 
Turkmenistan1968 
Uganda1949IDP needed for stays longer than 90 days.
Ukraine1968 
United Arab Emirates1968 
United States1949If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. You may need to show an IDP to your insurance company if you’re involved in an accident.
Uruguay1968 
Uzbekistan1968 
Vatican City1949 
Venezuela1949 
Vietnam1968 
Zimbabwe1968 
Mini Plant Oxford

UK new car investment plummets as firms spend £330 million on no-deal Brexit

Mini Plant Oxford

Investment in the British car industry has all but stalled in 2019 as car makers instead pump hundreds of millions into preparing for a hard Brexit that may never happen.

The Brexit bill currently totals £330 million, reveals the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

Investment in new models, facilities and jobs, in contrast, is just £90 million.

SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes

SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes says the fear of no deal is causing investors to “sit on their hands… the entire global car industry is investing [in the future], but in Britain, they’re spending on Brexit contingencies”.

This huge expenditure is “potentially for no reason” if a Brexit deal is struck.

Hawes described 2019’s £90 million newly-pledged investment in the UK car industry as “way below trend”. Billions are normally spent each year preparing for new models and factory expansions.

Over the past seven years, the average annual investment in the UK car industry is £2.7 billion.

What could turn the 2019 trend around? “An ambitious Brexit deal that maintains frictionless trade… we look to the new administration to get a deal done quickly so manufacturers can get back to the business of building cars”.

Last week, the SMMT wrote to new PM Boris Johnson warning no-deal Brexit was ‘an existential threat’.

Hawes admitted yesterday the organisation has yet to receive a reply.

41 percent of car industry WANTS a no-deal Brexit

Brexit and the car industryA survey by Autovista suggests many of those working in the car industry across Europe would accept a no-deal Brexit – if it meant a swifter exit from the EU.

In total, 41 percent of respondents said Britain should cut itself off completely from Europe and accept no deal.

However, the second most popular answer to ‘What should the UK do?’ was to cancel Article 50 and remain. The one thing these polar opposite options have in common? They’re both over and done with in the space of a month.

Tired of waiting for EU

The least popular option was an extension to the negotiation. Along with ‘other’, it attracted less than five percent of the votes. The current leave date is 31 October 2019, delayed from 29 March.

Many who commented on the survey said they’d given up hope on the government coming to an agreement with the EU. They’d rather we leave, and deal with the consequences.

Some might say that’s a bit like turkeys voting for Christmas, given the troubles the industry has warned of should a no-deal Brexit occur.

Brexit means more people are delaying buying a new car

Buying a new car

While Brexit leaves the country shrouded in uncertainty, Britain’s new car buyers are dealing a blow to the nation’s car dealers.

According to research conducted by BuyaCar, almost half of Britain’s new car buyers are delaying the purchase of their next vehicle for two years or more, with Brexit cited as the primary reason for the delay by more motorists than at any time since the 2016 referendum.

In the aftermath of the historic EU referendum, one in five motorists said they expected to change their car within the next three months, with just 27.7 percent saying they would wait two years or more.

Today, just 4.8 percent said they expected to buy a new car in the next three months, with 47.5 percent claiming they’re planning to hold on to their existing car for at least the next two years.

Earlier this year, Mike Hawes, chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), warned: “With fewer than 60 days before we leave the EU and the risk of crashing out without a deal looking increasingly real, UK Automotive is on red alert.

“Brexit uncertainty has already done enormous damage to output, investment and jobs.”

Erring on the side of caution

New Jaguars for sale

Austin Collins, managing director of BuyaCar.co.uk, said: “Even as we announce these figures it’s against the backdrop of another series of Parliamentary votes that seem to take us no further forward in understanding how Brexit will affect everybody.

“We believe it is this continued uncertainty rather than the idea of Brexit itself that has finally made consumers err on the side of caution about their immediate plans to change cars.

“When we first began measuring consumer sentiment in relation to Brexit it was clear that the vast majority of car buyers weren’t worried and that was reflected in the large number who were intending to start shopping for a car in the next few months.

“The way that figure has plummeted from 20 percent to less than five per cent, as people wait to understand what Brexit looks like, comes as little surprise.

“Against a wider backdrop of industry concern over future tariffs, supply chains and other issues affecting car manufacture and retail, the news that consumers are suddenly wary about committing to their next car purchase can only add to those headaches.”

Brexit deal or no-deal, drivers need their papers

Channel Tunnel France

From 29 March, regardless of whether there’s a Brexit deal or no-deal, British motorists will probably require a Green Card to drive in the EU. That’s according to fleet management specialist Venson Automotive Solutions.

The company is urging businesses to ensure that employees have the right paperwork in place to take their company car abroad, as simply having a UK driving licence won’t cover the legal requirements once the UK has left the EU. If the country leaves without a deal, the situation gets more complicated.

In the event of a no-deal, it is highly likely that drivers will be refused access to the EU (except the Republic of Ireland) if their passport expires within six months. Drivers are advised to check their passport’s expiry date using this government tool.

The government is pushing for UK driving licences to be recognised for trips to Europe, but in the worst case scenario, drivers will require an International Driving Permit (IDP) for all EEA countries (EU plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) except Ireland.

The Green Card

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, drivers will require a Green Card from their insurance provider as proof that their car is covered. 

The Green Card will replace the current European Certificate of Insurance, which allows UK citizens to travel under one simple certificate. Drivers of leased and rented vehicles require a VE103 certificate from their hire or leasing company before taking a vehicle overseas.

Simon Staton, director of client management at Venson Automotive Solutions said: “Under the Brexit deal drafted at the end of 2018, visa-free travel should continue as it currently stands, until the end of the transition period.

“But in the event of a no-deal, businesses need to make sure they are fully aware of what arrangements need to be made before their drivers get on the road in European countries.”

Venson’s European motoring checklist

Venson Automotive Solutions has issued an eight-point checklist for company car users driving in Europe. This can be summarised as follows:

  • If you’re taking your company car to Europe contact your fleet manager or fleet management company to check whether you need an authority to travel form, a VE103. Processing of the form typically takes two weeks.
  • Check your passport to ensure it is not within six months of the expiry date. If it is, it will need to be renewed.
  • Check if you need a Green Card. This replaces the current European Certificate of Insurance.
  • Even if you regularly drive abroad always check the local rules of the road before you go, as requirements can change.
  • Check your service schedule, and if one is due, make sure it’s carried out in advance of your visit to reduce the chance of expensive breakdowns while you’re abroad.
  • Check all tyres for condition, pressure and tread depth before you go. Most countries have the same requirement as the UK – a minimum tread depth of 1.6mm over the central three-quarters of the tread and around the whole circumference.
  • Before setting off on your journey make sure you have valid breakdown cover for Europe.
  • Many countries require visiting motorists to carry a safety bag. Check the AA website for country advice before you go.

Read more

 

Garages predict Brexit price rises and parts shortages

garages post-brexit

As many as 45 percent of garages have taken steps to get ready for Brexit (and possibility of ‘no deal’) by switching to UK-based suppliers. 

A study by WhoCanFixMyCar surveyed a network of independent garages across the UK. It found that one in six garages have been stockpiling parts ahead of the projected EU exit date of Friday 29 March.

More than half (52 percent) of garages anticipate an increase in labour costs after Britain has left the EU. And almost two thirds believe drivers will be hesitant to get repairs done for fear of cost increases.

More than half of garages also predict that parts will be more expensive, with 42 percent saying the availability of parts in the UK post-Brexit was in doubt.

garages post-brexit

“Since the referendum resulted in the UK government triggering article 50, Brexit has been arguably the biggest talking point for people across the UK and much of Europe,” said Al Preston, co-founder of WhoCanFixMyCar.com

“However with so much uncertainty on what happens when we leave, business owners have been left wondering how to prepare.

“The garage and repair industry is truly global, and many OEM parts are only manufactured outside of the UK.

“With the news that companies such as Honda and Nissan have closed factories to move production elsewhere, it only fuels worry for garage owners. However, it’s good to see so many taking precautions pre-Brexit, as I’m sure this can’t be said for all industries.”

We’ll see how it all pans out in less than a month…