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Record numbers of used cars sold in 2016

2016 breaks record for used car sales

Record numbers of used cars sold in 2016

The number of used cars sold in 2016 is believed to have hit 7.7 million – making it the most successful year for the used car market since 2004.

The data comes from expert Cap HPI, which says the used car market is set to exceed last year’s figure of 7.2 million and equal the previous record of 7,731,609 vehicles, set in 2004.

Commenting on the findings, Cap HPI’s Black Book senior editor, James Dower, said: “Strong demand has characterised the 2016 market. It has led to stable used values and supported strong results for the industry’s retailers.

“It looks like 2016 will beat a strong 2015 and the previous record of 2004. While 2017 isn’t without its challenges, motor retail is in great shape heading into the new year.”

Used car values are also strong, says the company, with electric vehicles putting in a particularly strong show on the used market. The Nissan Leaf showed values increase by 2.7% at one year, 10,000 miles, compared to a year before.

Hybrid sales are also buoyant – with values increasing by 2.7% after three years and 60,000 miles compared to 2015.

Ferrari 328 GTS

Ferrari 328 GTS review: Retro Road Test

Ferrari 328 GTSWe’ve covered a lot of bases in these reviews, from a £2,000 Skoda to a £200,000 Porsche. But we’ve never driven a classic Ferrari… until now. Welcome to the Retro Road Test Christmas special.

The prancing horse in question is a 328: the entry-point to Ferrari’s mid-1980s range, alongside the Mondial, Testarossa, 412 and – latterly – F40. Thirty years on, it remains one of the most beautiful ‘modern’ Ferraris – and potentially one of the most sensible, too.

This 1988 328 is a targa-topped GTS (Gran Turismo Spider), kindly loaned to us by GVE London. It’s for sale at GVE’s Uxbridge showroom, priced at £129,900.

What are its rivals?Honda NSX

If you were shopping for a new Ferrari 488 GTB, you might also look at the Aston Martin V12 Vantage, Audi R8, Lamborghini Huracan, Noble M600, McLaren 650S, Mercedes-AMG GT S or Porsche 911 Turbo S.

Back in 1988, supercar buyers weren’t so spoilt for choice. The 328 had just three rivals: the Lamborghini Jalpa, Lotus Esprit and Porsche 930 Turbo. Oh, and the De Tomaso Pantera, if you really must.

Perhaps the most obvious alternative today is the original Honda NSX. Launched in 1990, the NSX has an identical power output to the 328 and shares its mid-engined layout, wedgy profile and cockpit-style cabin. It’s a sharper drive than the Ferrari – and cheaper to buy, too. But it doesn’t offer the same investment potential.

Which engine does it use?Ferrari 328 GTS

Fire up this mid-mounted V8 and there are no theatrical throttle blips or showboating exhaust pops. Only when you approach its lofty 7,700rpm redline does this engine sound special. Well, needs must…

The 328 uses a 3.2-litre development of the 3.0 quattrovalvole (four valves per cylinder) V8 from the Ferrari 308. Maximum power is 274hp at 7,000rpm, while peak torque is 224lb ft at 5,500rpm. In a car weighing a modest 1,325kg, that’s good for 0-60mph in 5.5 seconds and a top speed of circa. 160mph.

What’s it like to drive?Ferrari 328 GTS

Ferrari’s open-gate manual gearbox looks timelessly cool, but boy it needs some muscle – especially when cold. I’m advised to short-shift from first to third until the oil is warmed-up. However, I immediately fail by forgetting first gear is on a dog-leg: down and left, where reverse might usually be. Forget your click-click flappy paddles, this car demands deliberate, decisive inputs.

The same goes for the unassisted steering, which is heavy at low speeds, and the engine, which demands to be kept on the boil. The brakes are far better than most cars of this era, though, despite the pedals being ridiculously skewed towards the centre of the car.

On damp, December tarmac, I won’t pretend I pushed the 328 anywhere near its limits. But I did escape the London suburbs and find some quiet lanes, stowing the targa top behind the seats (a two-minute job, incidentally) and relishing the rasp of the V8 as it bounced off the hedgerows.

It took a while, but here the Ferrari and I had a meeting of minds. Its gorgeous Momo steering wheel danced in my hands as we dived through a series of bends, poised and precise. If offers no electronic safety nets, and thus no excuses. Driving a 328 is physical, cerebral and utterly analogue – and all the better for it.

Reliability and running costsFerrari 328 GTS

The 328 is considered one of the most reliable classic Ferraris. An evolution of the 308, launched in 1975, it’s a relatively simple car, free from electronic wizardry. Bosch K-Jetronic mechanical fuel injection was the order of the day here.

Unlike many Ferraris, a 328 can be serviced without removing the engine. This keeps servicing costs down: GVE estimates around £750 for a new cambelt, plus oil and filter change. Taking into account wear-and-tear parts, such as tyres and brake pads, budget around £2,500 a year in total.

Fuel economy is quoted as 22.5mpg at a constant 56mph – and probably low teens if you give the car a workout. Still, look after your 328 and it should be an appreciating asset. With luck, that rise in value could outweigh the running costs altogether.

Could I drive it every day?Ferrari 328 GTS

In theory, yes. Amazingly, the 328 is shorter and narrower than a current Ford Focus, so it’s compact enough to feel nimble in the city. That’s not something you could say about the wide-boy Testarossa, or indeed the majority of 21st century supercars.

Ride quality is better than modern machines, too – thank absorbent 55-profile tyres – and the 328 has enough luxuries (air-con, electric windows, um… a cassette player) to be comfortable on longer journeys. It feels like a sports car built for the road, rather than the racetrack.

The big question, of course, is should you drive it every day? There, the answer is probably ‘no’. The rising value of 328s dictates that most owners want to keep wear and mileage to a minimum. And on that note…

How much should I pay?Ferrari 328 GTS

The 308 GTS was built in large numbers for a Ferrari. In total, 6,068 left Maranello, versus 1,344 for the hard-top GTB.

Prices vary widely depending on mileage and condition. The cheapest UK-based GTS at the time of writing was a left-hand-drive car with 60,000 miles for £59,995. At the other end of the scale, a GTS with a scant 275 miles on the clock was advertised at £169,990.

GVE’s car falls somewhere in the middle. It’s covered a modest 13,000 miles from new – the equivalent of less than 500 miles a year – and is offered at £129,900.

What should I look out for?David Rai

We asked GVE owner David Rai (pictured) and the company’s leading Ferrari expert, Guy Tedder, what to look for when buying a Ferrari 328. These are their top five tips:

  • As with all Ferraris, service history is of paramount importance. Originality is vital with older cars, too.
  • Don’t be scared off by service stamps from a specialist; they can be a better bet than Ferrari main dealers, who don’t necessarily know much about the classic models.
  • All 328s had a galvanised body, so rust problems aren’t a big issue. However, check the bottoms of the doors and the back of the rear wheelarches for possible corrosion.
  • Windows can become slow and shuddery through lack of use. This can be rectified by lubricating the moving parts inside the door.
  • Always check that the air conditioning works efficiently. It wasn’t the most well-designed system in the world, and most cars have been converted to new gas by now.

Should I buy one?Ferrari 328 GTS

The Pininfarina-penned 328 is an object of beauty. I had one on my bedroom wall as a child and, unlike yours truly, it has only grown lovelier with age.

It isn’t particularly quick by 2016 standards (a Ford Focus RS would leave it for dust), but that hardly matters. The Ferrari offers a driving experience that’s immersive, invigorating and intoxicating. It’s a car you’ll want to learn more about: to discover its abilities by developing your own. It isn’t perfect, but the quirks are all part of its character.

For the price of this particular 328 GTS, you could buy a new Porsche 911 Turbo, a car that is, objectively, better in every way. But that is missing the point. The Ferrari is a car to be enjoyed on sunny Sunday mornings and special occasions. And it’s a savvy investment, too.

So, our Retro Road Test Christmas special didn’t disappoint. Let’s just hope Santa is paying attention…

Pub factFerrari 328 GTS

Ferrari built 542 UK right-hand-drive examples of the 328 GTS between 1986 and 1989. Of these, 292 had anti-lock (ABS) brakes.

According to Guy Tedder, ABS, models are slightly less desirable due to revised suspension geometry that made the car feel less responsive. ABS cars – like the one seen here – are easily identified by their convex alloy wheels. Non-ABS cars have concave alloys.

The 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

The 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

The 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worthThe classic car market is celebrating a buoyant end to the year, that’s according to data released by insurance firm Hagerty. Using data from the cars that generate the most enquiries, we present the 10 cars in reverse order. If you sold a Peugeot 205 GTI or Audi Quattro at the beginning of the year, you might want to look away now.

10. Mercedes-Benz 450 SLC: 21.4% increase

2016 value: £10,200

2015 value: £8,400

The 5.0-litre 450SLC was built to allow Mercedes-Benz to go racing in the 1978 World Rally Championship. Of all the cars featured on the Hagerty list, we think this one offers the best value for money. Just over £10,000 to secure what is undoubtedly far more interesting than anything offered by Mercedes-Benz today.

9. Citroen SM: 26.5% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £34,125

2015 value: £26,975

Speaking of things far more interesting… Values of the Citroen SM continue to head north, as the market wakes up to the fact that this was one of the coolest creations of the 1970s. Part Citroen, part Maserati, the SM was a victim of circumstances beyond its control.

8. Ford Capri 2.8i: 28.0% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £13,950

2015 value: £10,900

We remember a time when you couldn’t give a Ford Capri away. Today, even the lowly four-cylinder cars command a sizeable premium, but six-cylinder Capris attract the most interest. In March 2016, a Ford Capri 280 ‘Brooklands’ sold at auction for £54,000…

7. Porsche 944 Turbo: 31.0% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £21,875

2015 value: £16,700

As 911 values continue to spiral out of control, it’s logical that some magic dust would be sprinkled over other Porsche models. Not too long ago, you could secure a 944 for a nominal amount. Today, the 944 Turbo has broken the £20,000 mark.

6. Jensen Interceptor III: 36.9% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £51,250

2015 value: £37,425

Meanwhile, this Anglo-Italian grand tourer has enjoyed a remarkable 2016, with values shooting up from £37,425 to £51,250. That’s an increase of 36.9%.

5. Porsche 928 GTS: 67.6% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £33,850

2015 value: £20,200

Hagerty says: “Front engine Porsches have been rising rapidly across the board for the last 18 months. The 928 is just starting to be considered for the superb sports that it is – a huge commitment by Porsche to their support and restoration has helped this.”

4. BMW 3.0 CSL: 70.8% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £83,800

2015 value: £49,050

Wow. Just wow. A year ago we were reporting a 1.1% increase in values, but a further 70.8% increase has seen the 3.0 CSL break through the £80,000 mark and on its way to six figures.

3. Aston Martin Lagonda S1: 71.6% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £62,725

2015 value: £36,550

Not to be confused with the wedge-tastic Lagonda S2, the Aston Martin Lagonda S1 was a four-door version of the Aston Martin V8 (pictured). Only seven were ever built, so we’re surprised to discover that Hagerty receives so many enquiries about this limited-run car.

2. Peugeot 205 GTi 1.6: 84.8% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £11,275

2015 value: £6,100

Hagerty says: “Over the summer of 2016, Peugeot 205 GTIs rocketed in value, with exceptional examples achieving over £30,000. The difference between fair and concours examples is huge.”

1. Audi Quattro RR: 151.2% increaseThe 10 most popular classic cars – and what they’re worth

2016 value: £47,925

2015 value: £19,075

Congratulations if you bought an Audi Quattro at the start of the year. Values of the desirable 20v RR model have skyrocketed over the past 12 months, up a massive 151.2%. Fire up the appreciator…

The classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

The classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

The classic cars you should have bought 21 years agoHindsight is a wonderful thing. A little like Cher but without the makeup, we wish we could turn back time to snap up and store away the future classics of yesterday. This thought was triggered by the discovery of a newspaper cutting from August 1995, which listed the values of old cars then and a prediction for the turn of the millennium. It makes for strangely compelling reading.

Raising expectationsThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

The feature, which appeared in the Daily Mail, was based on data from Birmingham’s Aston University and looked at how depreciation, design and charisma could combine to “lift future value above expectations”. You’ll be amazed at how little some cars were worth in 1995 and how much they could be worth today. We’ve used the Hagerty classic car valuation tool for today’s valuations, with values based on excellent examples.

1982 Alfa Romeo Alfasud SprintThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £2,213. 2000 forecast: £4,052. 2016 value: £8,800

Take the Alfa Romeo Alfasud Sprint. Back in 1995, you’d have paid around £2,213 for a good, clean 1982 example, but Dr. Robert Tinsley of Aston University predicted an increase of around £1,800 by the year 2000.

1981 Alfa Romeo AlfettaThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £1,110. 2000 forecast: £1,247. 2016 value: £5,900

The forecast for the Alfa Romeo Alfetta 2000 may have been a touch pessimistic. You could buy a 14-year-old Alfetta for little more than a ‘bag of sand’ in 1995, but today you’d need to part with around £6,000.

1981 Aston Martin LagondaThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £17,609. 2000 forecast: £35,528. 2016 value: £41,200

You don’t need the appliance of science to predict an increase in the value of an Aston Martin, but oh – for the chance to buy a wedge-tastic Lagonda for £17k! In 1995, you could have snapped up a Lagonda for the price of an entry-level Mercedes-Benz C-Class, but today, you’d need to fork out £40,000.

1983 Aston Martin V8The classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £27,855. 2000 forecast: £41,522. 2016 value: £80,600

It’s a similar story for the Aston Martin V8. In 1995 you could choose to spend circa £28,000 on a brand new TVR Chimaera or a 12-year-old AM V8. Fast forward 21 years and if you opted for the latter, you could be sat on an £80,000 fortune. As for a 1995 TVR, around £12,000 would be closer to the mark.

1981 Audi QuattroThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £5,960. 2000 forecast: £10,468. 2016 value: £18,600

Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past year, you’ll know that 1980s cars – and in particular, performance models – are hot property right now. We think Aston University got its forecast spot-on, because an Audi Quattro worth £5,960 in 1995 would be worth around £18,600 in 2016. Note, this figure is based on an early left-hand-drive model. You’ll pay considerably more for a late 20-valve car.

1981 BMW 635 CSIThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £7,236. 2000 forecast: £14,636. 2016 value: £8,300

Dr. Tinsley, who originally prepared the data for Maxim magazine, had high hopes for the BMW 635 CSI, predicting it would be worth twice as much by the year 2000. The fact that it’s priced around £8,300 in 2016 suggests that, while the car has risen in value, it’s not the gold mine predicted.

1979 Citroen CX PallasThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £1,500. 2000 forecast: £1,662. 2016 value: £4,500 (estimated)

In truth, you might be able to buy a Citroen CX Pallas for £1,500 in 2016, but it’ll need a considerable amount of work to bring it up to concours standard. The article was predicting a tiny increase in value, perhaps noting the fact that big French cars are a hard-sell in the UK. With DS and SM values heading north, the CX could be the next big thing.

1981 De Tomaso DeauvilleThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £5,476. 2000 forecast: £8,462. 2016 value: £24,300

In 2016, your biggest challenge might be finding a De Tomaso Deauville, rather than the £24,300 you’ll need to secure a mint example. To think you could buy one for less than the price of a Fiat Panda in 1995.

1982 Ferrari 400iThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £20,109. 2000 forecast: £34,535. 2016 value: £41,500

The 400i isn’t the most desirable car Ferrari has ever built, which might help to explain why the price you’ll pay today is just £7,000 more than the forecast for the year 2000. Should have bought that De Tomaso.

1984 Ferrari Mondial QVThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £19,495. 2000 forecast: £42,136. 2016 value: £29,300

No, sorry Dr. Tinsley, you got this one wrong. Even in an age when the values of 70s and 80s classics are going through the roof, a Ferrari Mondial QV is still worth less than £30,000. You’d have been better off buying a mint Peugeot 205 GTi and dragging that out of storage.

1987 Ferrari TestarossaThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £43,818. 2000 forecast: £45,977.  2016 value: £133,800

We suspect the boffins at Aston University never watched an episode of Miami Vice or had a poster of a Testarossa on their bedroom wall. The days of an affordable Ferrari Testarossa are long gone. To provide some context, the 1995 value is roughly half the price you’d have paid for a brand new Ferrari F355 Berlinetta with a couple of options.

1983 Fiat X1/9The classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £4,104. 2000 forecast: £8,406. 2016 value: £6,300

It’s fair to say the X1/9 hasn’t appreciated at quite the same rate as a Ferrari, but if you’re after a pocket-size Ferrari on the cheap, the little Fiat is a good start. Amazing to think that production of the Marcello Gandini-designed sports car began in 1972 and very nearly made it into the 90s.

1977 Ford Capri 1600 GLThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £1,155. 2000 forecast: £1,309. 2016 value: £6,000 (estimate)

In 1995, it was a real struggle to sell a four-cylinder Capri, with even the six-cylinder versions unlikely to attract much attention beyond enthusiast circles. This explains the modest forecast for the 1600 GL. You’ll pay a fair amount more for a Mk2 today, although Hagerty’s £30,000 valuation for a 280 Brooklands makes for grim reading for anyone who sold one before they became hot property.

1981 Ford Escort XR3iThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £1,534. 2000 forecast: £2,112. 2016 value: £5,000 (estimate)

The Ford Escort XR3i isn’t listed on the Hagerty valuation tool, but £5,000 is a rough estimate for a good example. Like the Capri, the XR3i wasn’t blessed with the best image in the mid 90s, which explains the low cost and pessimistic forecast. Storing one away in 1995 won’t have generated a fortune, but now could be the time to think about selling.

1987 Lamborghini CountachThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £66,036. 2000 forecast: £120,000. 2016 value: £255,000

In 1995, a Lamborghini Diablo would have set you back around £144,000 – a price that could get you not one but two Countach LP500S QVs. Right now, that Countach is probably worth a cool quarter of a million.

1984 Lamborghini JalpaThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £25,001. 2000 forecast: £69,967. 2016 value: £69,400

The Jalpa isn’t as iconic as the Countach, and values reflect this, but it’s rather uncanny that Aston University’s forecast for 2000 is almost exactly the same as today’s Hagerty valuation. The Jalpa was the Countach’s more affordable sibling and only 410 were built.

1981 Lotus EclatThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £6,715. 2000 forecast: £10,748. 2016 value: £6,500

Well would you look at that: today’s valuation for the Lotus Eclat is actually less than the price you’d have paid in 1995, proving that not all future classics are a sound investment.

1984 Lotus EspritThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £10,643. 2000 forecast: £20,300. 2016 value: £20,000

There’s slightly better news for Lotus Esprit owners, although the ‘double your money’ forecast was well wide of the mark. In fact, the 2016 valuation is less than the 2000 forecast.

1982 Maserati KhamsinThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £16,255. 2000 forecast: £29,226. 2016 value: £98,200

Another Marcello Gandini masterpiece and another Italian gem that has rocketed in value. The 4.9-litre V8 Maserati Khamsin was launched at the 1973 Paris Motor Show, with 435 units built before production ceased in 1982. In 1995 it could have been yours for little more than the price of a Fiat Tipo 16v. Today, it’s nudging £100,000.

1981 Porsche 911 TurboThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £20,536. 2000 forecast: £33,062. 2016 value: £45,400

Looking back, the £20,536 being asked for a 1981 Porsche 911 Turbo in 1995 was an absolute steal, not least because a new one would have cost in excess of £91,000. That same car today is worth more than double. Dare we suggest that price is likely to continue heading north?

1982 Porsche 924 TurboThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £7,214. 2000 forecast: £12,092. 2016 value: £10,500

Finally, Porsche 924 prices are on the up, but not at the brisk rate predicted in 1995. An excellent 924 Turbo will set you back around £10,000, which is £2,000 more than the 2000 forecast. Of course, the one you really want is the 924 Carrera GT – a snip at around £47,000 – £60,500.

1975 Range RoverThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £2,891. 2000 forecast: £3,836. 2016 value: £34,800

Not even the brains at Aston University would have predicted the demand for the Range Rover Classic. Back in 1995, the Classic was being sold alongside its replacement – the P38A, but early models weren’t exactly in demand. Little surprise then that the 2000 forecast was so low. Oh to be able to find a 1975 Classic for £2,891…

1975 Triumph Dolomite SprintThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1975 value: £2,837. 2000 forecast: £5,388. 2016 value: £6,000

Based on these figures, the Triumph Dolomite Sprint hasn’t exactly rocked the classic car world. But it’s rather refreshing to find such a credible and desirable classic available for such a relatively low price. Will the same be true in another 21 years?

1984 TVR 350iThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £9,906. 2000 forecast: £19,009. 2016 value: £8,000 (estimate)

The TVR 350i was essentially a Tasmin powered by a 3.5-litre Rover V8 engine, although it doesn’t appear to be as desirable as Aston University predicted. Indeed, though a £19,009 valuation was forecast for 2000, you can now pick up a 350i for less than the 1995 value.

1979 Volkswagen Golf GTIThe classic cars you should have bought 21 years ago

1995 value: £2,500. 2000 forecast: £4,165. 2016 value: £13,300

In 1995, the memory of the Mk1 Volkswagen Golf GTi was still fresh in the mind, not least because the then-current Golf GTI was a more lacklustre affair. If you bought a Golf GTI on the strength of the Daily Mail article, we applaud you, especially if you still own the same car.

What classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

What classic cars cost then – and what they would cost now

What classic cars cost then – and what they cost nowYour first encounter with a car was probably when your parents drove you home from the maternity ward. Safe to say you won’t remember much about the journey, but did your folks ever reveal their choice of wheels for this momentous drive? And would would that car cost in today’s money? We’ve crunched the numbers to find out. 

1950: Ford AngliaWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1950 price: £310

Price adjusted: £9,888

According to a copy of Motor, October 1948, the Ford Anglia was the cheapest four-wheel car in Britain. In 1950, the Anglia – a descendant of the current Ford Focus – would have set you back £310, the equivalent of £9,888 in today’s money.

1959: MiniWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1959 price: £497 – £537

Price adjusted: £10,502 – £11,348

Although synonymous with the Swinging Sixties, the Mini burst onto the scene in 1959, with prices ranging from £497 to £537. It quite literally changed the shape of British motoring and laid the foundations for a new decade.

1964: Lotus CortinaWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1964 price: £1,100

2016 price adjusted: £20,799

Back in 1964, you could drive away in this super-saloon for £1,100 – about a third of the average house price. Inflation adjusted, that’s a little over £20,000. Good luck securing a roadworthy Mk1 Lotus Cortina for that price in 2016.

1966: Porsche 911What classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1966 price: £3,438

2016 price adjusted: £60,042

In 1966, as England lifted the still-gleaming Jules Rimet trophy, the Porsche 911 was in its infancy. You could have celebrated the Three Lions’ triumph by purchasing a 911 for £3,438 (£60,042 in 2016). Today, you’ll need at least £76,412.

1969: Ford CapriWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1969 price: £890

2016 price adjusted: £13,939

As if to bridge the gap between the 60s and 70s, Ford launched the Capri in 1969. The ‘car you always promised yourself’ became a firm favourite of the 1970s, not least because of its low price. Just £890 for the ‘European Mustang’ – what a steal.

1975: BMW 2002 TiiWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1975 price: £3,659

2016 price adjusted: £34,431

The rather brilliant BMW 2002 Tii cost an eye-watering £3,659 in 1975 – the equivalent of £34,431 in 2016. That’s more than the price of a new BMW M140i.

1982: Fiat Panda34_Cost_Car_Year_Born

1982 price: £2,995

2016 price adjusted: £10,372

Fiat celebrated the Panda’s first birthday by slashing its price to £2,995. “Fiat [has] discovered a way of making Pandas breed like rabbits.” Well, quite. The equivalent price today: £10,372. That’s cheaper than a 2016 Fiat Panda…

1988: Rover 800 VitesseWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1988 price: £19,944

2016 price adjusted: £50,656

Oh, Rover, where did it all go wrong? Actually, that’s a rhetorical question, because its demise has been well documented. In 1988, the not-so-small matter of £19,944 could get you behind the wheel of the fastest road-going Rover: the 800 Vitesse.

1992: Jaguar XJS 4.0 ConvertibleWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1992 price: £39,900

2016 price adjusted: £77,284

Check out the price of a Jaguar XJS 4.0 Convertible in 1992. At just shy of £40,000, it was about two-thirds of the average house price. Expensive? At £77,284 in today’s money, that’s more than a Jaguar F-Type S AWD.

1997: Porsche BoxsterWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1997 price: £33,950

2016 price adjusted: £57,510

Check out the launch price of the Porsche Boxster. At £33,950 it sounds good value, but inflation adjusted that results in a figure of £57,510. That’s not cheap, especially when you consider the average house price in 1997 was £76,103. We should also point out that an entry-level 718 Boxster could be yours for a mere £41,739.