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The 10 most reliable car brands

The 10 most reliable car brands

Japanese brands finish top in the What Car? reliability study. We count down the top 10 car brands, including Honda and – oh yes – Alfa Romeo

British drivers are risking £27m in fines over this minor fault

British drivers are risking £27m in fines over this minor fault

British drivers are risking £27m in fines over this minor fault

A freedom of information investigation has revealed that 2.5 million vehicles failed their MOTs for illegal tyres last year – while police hit almost 9,000 drivers with fines for defective rubber.

If you’re caught driving with less than 1.6mm of tread, you could face a penalty of up to £2,500 and three points on your licence – per tyre.

The Confused.com investigation found that 10,766 endorsements were handed out for defective tyres in 2016. Multiplying this by the maximum £2,500 penalty, motorists could be risking nearly £27 million in fines for not checking their tyres.

While driving with bald tyres can have a dangerous effect on a car’s handling and stopping distance, especially in the wet, the research also revealed that drivers often aren’t in a rush to get their tyres changed.

Out of those who were found to have illegal tyres, more than a third (34%) did not get their tyres replaced straight away because they didn’t have the time, while almost a quarter (24%) said they couldn’t afford new tyres.

A further quarter (23%) admitted to driving with dangerous tyres because the garage could not fit them in sooner.

Confused.com’s motoring editor, Amanda Stretton, said: “It’s pretty shocking to find out that 2.5 million drivers have failed their MOTs as a result of not checking their tyres regularly.

“We understand that arranging to have your tyres changed seems like a hassle, and we know some drivers are concerned about how big a hole it’s going to burn in their pockets. But motorists need to ask themselves if it’s really worth risking three points on their license and enormous fines of up to £2,500 per tyre.”

The website has launched a new tyre tool that lets drivers compare the cost of tyres.

“Confused.com’s tyre tool helps to lower the cost of buying new tyres by allowing you to compare prices in advance,” added Stretton, “so there are no nasty surprises once you get to the garage. Plus, you can pay on the day and the cost of fitting and disposal of your old tyres is completely included in the price.”

Revealed: the UK’s most reliable cars

Revealed: the UK’s most reliable cars

Revealed: the UK’s most reliable cars

By using data from reliability surveys, you can increase the chances of buying a reliable motor, saving you hundreds, possibly thousands of pounds on repair bills. Using data from the Warranty Direct Reliability Index, we can reveal the 50 most reliable cars in the UK, with the results presented in reverse order.

50. Volkswagen Fox (2006-2012)

Reliability Index: 47

The Reliability Index is based on data acquired over more than a decade by Warranty Direct and includes the number of times a car fails, the cost of repairing it, the average time it spends off the road due to repairs and the average age of mileage of the vehicles. In short: the lower the Reliability Index score, the more reliable the car should be. According to Warranty Direct, the Volkswagen Fox creeps into the top 50 with a score of 47.

49. Toyota Auris (2007-2013)

Reliability Index: 46

The Reliability Index includes information on which parts of the car fail most often: air conditioning, axle and suspension, braking, cooling and heating, electrical, engine, fuel system, gearbox, steering system and transmission are all studied. The Toyota Auris scores well across the board, although the £379 average repair cost is one of the highest in the top 50.

48. Audi TT (1999-2006)

Reliability Index: 45

German cars are conspicuous by their absence, with Japanese cars dominating the upper reaches of the Reliability Index. The first generation Audi TT is the exception to the rule, providing the proof that style and dependability can mix. The braking system is the TT’s weakest point, if the Warranty Direct data is to be believed.

47. Mazda 3 (2004-2009)

Reliability Index: 45

A car will only be included in the Reliability Index when Warranty Direct has the data for at least 50 examples of each make and model. Aside from a poor score in the ‘axle and suspension’ category, the Mazda 3 produced a good set of results across the board.

46. Ford Ka (1996-2009)

46. Ford Ka (1996-2009)

Reliability Index: 43

The original Ford Ka is fun to drive, cheap to run and – according to the Warranty Direct data – is one of the most reliable used city cars in the UK. With an average repair cost of £140, it should be cheap to put right if things do go wrong. You just need to look out for the dreaded rust.

45. Renault Kangoo (2009-2012)

Reliability Index: 42

The Renault Kangoo would have appeared further up the table, but was let down by a poor record for electrical gremlins. If things go wrong, you can bank on spending £297 on fixing this van-based MPV.

44. Citroen Berlingo First (2005-2009)

Reliability Index: 42

If you’re after a no-frills, no-nonsense van-based MPV, you can do a lot worse than the Citroen Berlingo. A high roofline and a pair of sliding doors means this is more practical than a standard crossover, while it should provide years of reliable transport.

43. Renault Scenic (2009-2016)

Reliability Index: 41

Own up, you didn’t expect to a see a trio of French cars performing so well in a reliability survey, did you? The all-new Renault Scenic has gone off in a new direction, offering SUV-like styling and huge alloy wheels, but the Reliability Index suggests the outgoing model was surprisingly dependable. In common with the Kangoo, electrical issues are the primary complaint.

42. Toyota Corolla (2001-2007)

Reliability Index: 37

The Toyota Corolla badge has been banished from the UK, with the Auris taking its place. An evening in with a Corby trouser press might be more exciting, but at least the Corolla won’t let you down. Just don’t ask it to press your slacks.

41. Skoda Fabia (2007-2014)

41. Skoda Fabia (2007-2014)

Reliability Index: 37

The Fabia is the only Skoda to appear in the top 50, but it’s worth noting that the Warranty Direct data is a few years old. The Fabia is based on the Volkswagen Polo, a car that doesn’t make the top 50.

40. Suzuki Jimny (1998-present)

Reliability Index: 37

In more ways than one, the Suzuki Jimny is the car that goes on and on. It’ll venture further off the beaten track than some SUVs costing considerably more, and has been on sale in its current guise since 1998.

39. Toyota Prius (2009-2015)

Reliability Index: 36

The Toyota Prius is arguably the world’s most famous eco car – the darling of green-washed celebrity and Uber cab drivers. The previous generation Prius appears at number 39 on the list of dependable cars, but it’s not the most reliable generation on the list…

38. Vauxhall Zafira (1999-2005)

Reliability Index: 36

Another car you probably didn’t expect to see here: it’s the original Vauxhall Zafira. Thanks to its innovative Flex7 seating system, the Zafira won the hearts and minds of family across the land. It’s the 38th most reliable car in the Warranty Direct survey. Who’d have thought it?

37. Vauxhall Tigra (2004-2009)

Reliability Index: 35

No, not the original and increasingly appealing Tigra, but the second generation ‘Twin Top’ Tigra, introduced in 2004. The Corsa-based coupe-cabriolet is the second and final Vauxhall to appear on the list.

36. Nissan Micra (2002-2010)

36. Nissan Micra (2002-2010)

Reliability Index: 34

The K12 Nissan Micra isn’t the most practical of superminis: a lack of space for rear seat passengers and a small boot are two complaints. But aside from that, the third generation Micra is a thoroughly decent supermini.

35. Kia Rio (2005-2011)

Reliability Index: 34

Kia Rio owners have little cause for complaint, with the brakes being the only real issue highlighted by the Warranty Direct data. It’s not the most refined or exciting car you can buy, but you pays your money and you takes your choice. Or something.

34. Honda Civic (2006-2011)

Reliability Index: 33

The European Honda Civic caused quite a stir when it was unveiled in 2006 and – a decade on – it is no less eye catching. Buy a Civic with the excellent i-CTDi engine and you have the makings of one of the best diesel-engined family hatchbacks you can buy.

33. Audi A4 Allroad (2009-2015)

Reliability Index: 33

When it was new, the Audi A4 Allroad was criticised for being a tad expensive, especially once you had finished working your way through the list of options. On the used car market, this is less of an issue, so grab yourself one of the best looking estate cars of recent years. It’s pretty handy off the beaten track, too.

32. Citroen C3 Picasso (2009-present)

Reliability Index: 32

The compact MPV sector isn’t one for setting pulses racing, but the Citroen C3 Picasso is a rare beacon of light. The funky styling is complemented by a cool interior to provide a welcome tonic to the likes of the Nissan Note and Vauxhall Meri… sorry, drifted off there for a second.

31. Toyota Yaris (2006-2011)

31. Toyota Yaris (2006-2011)

Reliability Index: 32

You’ll have noticed that the Reliability Index isn’t exactly littered with exciting motors. What can we read into that? The cars on the list tend to be owned by caring drivers? Or that more exciting cars tend to be enjoyed and driven hard? We suspect it’s a combination of the two. Meanwhile, the Toyota Yaris takes its place at number 31.

30. Nissan Note (2006-2013)

Reliability Index: 31

Aside from poor results in the ‘axle and suspension’ and ‘electrical’ categories, the Nissan Note performed well in Warranty Direct’s Reliability Index. The Note majors on space, practicality and technology.

29. Toyota Aygo (2005-2014)

Reliability Index: 31

The Toyota Aygo is the result of a platform-sharing venture with Citroen and Peugeot, but it’s interesting to note that the French models deliver a more impressive set of results. On the plus side, at £211, the Toyota Aygo is the cheapest to repair should things go wrong.

28. Nissan Almera (2000-2006)

Reliability Index: 30

Remember the Nissan Almera? This was the family hatchback Nissan ditched in order to pursue a new career peddling crossovers to an unsuspecting public. It might be the automotive equivalent of semolina, but the Almera should prove to be reliable.

27. Hyundai i30 (2007-2011)

Reliability Index: 28

The Hyundai i30 is the beige cardigan of the five-door family hatchback segment: practicality and comfort are more prevalent than magic and sparkle. Val Doonican looked good in a cardigan. We’re not sure he’d have rocked the i30 look, mind.

26. Toyota Prius (2003-2009)

26. Toyota Prius (2003-2009)

Reliability Index: 28

We’re almost at the midway point – assuming you’re still with us – where we find the second generation Toyota Prius. In truth, this was a far superior product to the Prius it replaced and helped to propel the hybrid into the mainstream.

25. Mitsubishi Colt (2004-2013)

Reliability Index: 27

Number 25 in the Reliability Index and number 25 on the list of superminis you’ve probably forgotten. The Mitsubishi Colt has one huge selling point: it’s not a Mitsubishi Mirage.

24. Honda Civic (2000-2006)

Reliability Index: 26

Before Honda went all space-age and daring with the Civic, it built something a little more sombre. But don’t let the bland styling put you off, because this Civic is good to drive, practical and – according to Warranty Direct – should be reliable.

23. Ford Fusion (2002-2012)

Reliability Index: 26

The Ford Fusion is a proper love/hate car. Some will like the Fiesta-meets-SUV styling, while others will be turned off by its frumpy looks. Whatever, the Fusion is reasonably practical and OK to drive.

22. Ford Fiesta (2008-present)

Reliability Index: 24

Given that the Ford Fiesta is the UK’s best-selling car, Warranty Direct would have been able to draw from a large data pool for the Reliability Index. So it’s encouraging to see it sitting just outside the top 20.

21. SEAT Ibiza (2006-2009)

21. SEAT Ibiza (2006-2009)

Reliability Index: 24

We’re getting to the stage where the cars are as dependable as your pet labrador. But that’s where the similarities end, because while the SEAT Ibiza should be a reliable supermini, it won’t fetch a stick for you or shake its wet coat in the hallway.

20. Mazda 2 (2007-2015)

Reliability Index: 23

There’s a tinge of excitement here, as we reach the top 20 most reliable cars you can buy. But before you get too carried away, we should point out that the Almera Tino is still to come. As for the Mazda 2: it’s great to drive, good to look at and won’t let you down.

19. Peugeot 107 (2005-2014)

Reliability Index: 22

Of the three platform-sharing superminis, the Peugeot 107 is likely to be the most expensive should things go wrong. On the plus side, the Warranty Direct data suggests it’s likely to be more reliable than the Toyota Aygo.

18. Peugeot Partner Tepee (2008-present)

Reliability Index: 22

It’s yet another wipe-clean, no-nonsense van-based MPV, and with an average repair cost of £168, the Peugeot Partner Tepee is one of the most cost-effective cars on the list. The Warranty Direct data proves that there’s more to buying a car than just image-friendly badges and glossy brochures.

17. Honda Accord (2008-2015)

Reliability Index: 21

Ah, there’s a sense of comfort associated with the fact that the Honda Accord appears so high on the list. It’s the executive saloon of choice for those who put reliability and dependability above all else when it comes to buying a car. And it’s all the better for it.

16. Toyota Yaris (2003-2005)

16. Toyota Yaris (2003-2005)

Reliability Index: 21

The first generation Toyota Yaris is the 16th most reliable car in the country, but it’s worth noting that the data is based on the facelifted car, built between 2003 and 2005. These later cars are worth seeking out on the used market.

15. Ford Focus (1998-2004)

Reliability Index: 20

The first generation Ford Focus revolutionised the family hatchback sector, sending shockwaves throughout the segment. It was chalk and cheese compared with the Escort it replaced (the Escort was the cheese), and encouraged many carmakers to up their game.

14. Kia Picanto (2004-2011)

Reliability Index: 19

The Kia Picanto didn’t send shockwaves through anything when it arrived in 2004, but buyers were attracted to its five-door practicality and excellent value for money.

13. Nissan Qashqai+2 (2008-2013)

Reliability Index: 18

The Nissan Qashqai+2 – so called because it offers a row of extra seats – does something the standard Qashqai cannot do, by appearing on the list of the most reliable cars. Buyers loved the seven-seat Qashqai, so it was a surprise to see Nissan ditching the option in the new version.

12. Honda Jazz (2001-2008)

Reliability Index: 16

Three things in life are guaranteed: night follows day, there will be a DFS sale on, and the Honda Jazz will perform well in a reliability survey. If only everything in life was as reliable as a Jazz, as a famous Volkswagen ad so very nearly said. This data is based on the first generation Jazz, introduced in 2001.

11. Citroen C1 (2005-2014)

11. Citroen C1 (2005-2014)

Reliability Index: 16

Wait, what? A Honda Jazz beaten by a French car? What next, a person you actually recognise appearing in I’m a Failed Celebrity Get Me in There? Good work, Citroen C1.

10. Ford Ka (2008-2016)

Reliability Index: 16

This is where we split the wheat from the chaff: the top 10 most reliable cars in the UK. The second generation Ka might lack the cheekiness and fun-to-drive dynamics of the original Ka, but the Fiat 500-based city car does something its Italian sibling cannot achieve, by appearing on this list.

9. Chevrolet Kalos (2005-2011)

Reliability Index: 16

The Chevrolet Kalos started life as a Daewoo and was a replacement for the Astra-based Lanos. Now that the family tree has been explained, we’ll leave you to come to terms with the fact that there’s a Chevrolet performing so well in the Reliability Index.

8. Mazda MX-5 (2005-2015)

Reliability Index: 15

The Mazda MX-5 is proof that you can have your cake and eat it. One of the world’s best affordable sports cars just happens to be one of the most reliable, too. Assemble a Honda Jazz and Mazda MX-5 two-car garage and enjoy a stress-free life. Probably.

7. Mercedes-Benz CLC (2008-2010)

Reliability Index: 14

The CLC – the replacement for the old C-Class Sports Coupe – was designed to attract a younger audience to the Mercedes-Benz badge. It was rather expensive when new, which only served to limit sales to younger buyers, but it’s a classy buy on the used car market.

6. Hyundai i10 (2008-2013)

6. Hyundai i10 (2008-2013)

Reliability Index: 12

The Hyundai i10 isn’t the most exciting used city car you can buy, but the Warranty Direct data suggests that it might be one of the most dependable. The new i10 is a much-improved model, but a first generation is perfectly adequate if you intend to drive from A to B without visiting C.

5. Nissan Almera Tino (2000-2005)

Reliability Index: 12

The Spanish-built Almera Tino was Nissan’s response to the likes of the Renault Scenic and Vauxhall Zafira: a more practical version of the Almera hatchback. We’re struggling to find anything interesting to say. Goodness, is that the time?

4. Honda Insight (2009-2014)

Reliability Index: 7

Sadly, not the the original and futurist Honda Insight, but the second generation model, introduced in 2009. While the Mk1 Insight was arguably superior to the Prius, by the time the Mk2 had arrived, the Toyota had raced into a healthy lead. On the plus side: the Insight performs better in the Reliability Index.

3. Honda Jazz (2008-2015)

Reliability Index: 5

And so we reach the top three: the most reliable cars you can buy. It’s no surprise to find a Honda Jazz perched at such a lofty position. Indeed, it’s more surprising to find that it hasn’t grabbed the top spot…

2. Toyota iQ (2008-2014)

Reliability Index: 4

The three-metre long Toyota IQ was the country’s smallest four-seater, although in reality it was best suited to carrying three people. The Reliability Index suggests the tiny city car should be utterly reliable, although 100% of complaints concerned the engine.

1. Mitsubishi Lancer (2005-2008)

1. Mitsubishi Lancer (2005-2008)

Reliability Index: 4

With an average repair cost of just £69 and a near fault-free reputation, the Mitsubishi Lancer is the unlikely star of the Reliability Index. The best news: you can buy a Lancer for as little as £500. Bargain.

These are the times you should avoid travelling over half term

These are the times you should avoid travelling over half term

These are the times you should avoid travelling over half term

Half term holidays are on their way for many areas of the UK – with many families hoping to get away on one last break before winter truly arrives.

Car parts supplier Euro Car Parts has surveyed 1,000 parents to find out when most families are hoping to hit the road this half term – revealing the times and dates during which different areas are expected to experience unusually high levels of traffic.

The survey revealed that most parents will be heading away on their holidays on Monday 24th October, closely followed by Saturday 22nd. Euro Car Parts says that areas including Birmingham, Nottingham and Southampton will bear the brunt of the traffic, while tourism hotspots such as the Cotswolds and South West will also be busy.

The roads will be at their most congested at around midday – although the majority of parents say they’d rather get on the road earlier in the day.

On average, most holidaymakers expect to drive around 100 miles during their holiday – increasing to 120 miles for those in Nottingham and Birmingham.

Euro Car Parts’ UK CEO, Martin Gray, said: “It’s clear to see from these figures that there are definitely particular days and times when you should hold off on travelling if you wish to avoid the traffic. However, if you do end up caught in the rush, hopefully our tips for keeping the kids entertained will help!”

These tips include investing in a portable DVD player, or download audiobooks onto your phone to keep little bookworms amused while avoiding travel sickness.

RegionWhen to avoid travelling
Central England12pm – 12:15pm 24th October
South West England12pm – 12:15pm 24th October
Northern England12pm – 12:15pm 22nd October
Northern Ireland12pm – 12:15pm 4th October
Republic of Ireland1pm – 1:15pm 15th October
Scotland12:15pm – 12:30pm 9th October
South East England12pm – 12:15pm 10th October
Wales9am – 9:15am or 12pm – 12:15pm 23rd October
Young drivers aren't bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

Young drivers aren't bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

Young drivers aren't bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

On-the-spot fines for using your phone at the wheel could rise to £150 and four points on your licence – but research suggests this still won’t deter young drivers from using their mobiles when driving.

The Government is set to publish the results of a consultation which could advise increasing fines for mobile phone use from £100 and three penalty points.

A survey by Goodyear Tyres, as part of its Young Driver programme, found that 42% of 17 to 25-year-olds admitted to using their phone illegally within the last year – and nearly a quarter (23%) said they weren’t worried about being hit by a heavy fine for using their mobile while driving.

These statistics are supported by a survey carried out by the RAC – which found that, despite 52% of drivers welcoming an increase in penalties for mobile phone use, nearly a third (31%) said they felt it wouldn’t make any difference.

RAC spokesman Simon Williams said: “There is a very strong feeling from law-abiding motorists that something needs to be done to make drivers stop using their phones while driving. But while people want the penalties for committing this offence to be beefed up there is also an acceptance that nothing is likely to change due primarily to a lack of enforcement.

“From 2010 to 2015 England and Wales experienced a 27% decline in the number of roads police officers. The number of fixed penalty notices issued for using a handheld phone while driving reduced dramatically from a high of 125,500 in 2009 to 52,400 in 2012. In line with this, our own research has found that motorists believe there is little chance of being caught by a police officer (as opposed to a camera) for a driving offence.”

Goodyear’s research found that mobile phone use was the third most common distraction for young drivers – after eating and being distracted by something outside that caught their eye (such as passing a friend).

Of those surveyed, 29% admitted to calling or answering the phone, 28% said they have text a friend whilst behind the wheel, while one in ten admitted to using social media. 45% of the latter have searched newsfeeds or updated their Facebook status, while 32% have sent pictures using Snapchat.

Williams added: “In the 13 years since specific legislation was introduced making it illegal to use a handheld phone while driving, mobile phones have evolved into smartphones, and the increased features offered by apps and faster internet access has raised interaction among users to near addiction levels. While being glued to the screen of a mobile phone when walking is dangerous enough, doing the same thing at the wheel of a vehicle, even just occasionally is a recipe for disaster.

“Changing this behaviour will only come through a combination of actions. We need more rigorous enforcement of the law, increased penalties that act as a meaningful deterrent and a high profile advertising campaign that makes motorists fully aware of the serious consequences of using a handheld phone at the wheel of a vehicle.”

Young drivers aren't bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

Young drivers aren’t bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

Young drivers aren't bothered about proposed £150 fines for mobile phone use

On-the-spot fines for using your phone at the wheel could rise to £150 and four points on your licence – but research suggests this still won’t deter young drivers from using their mobiles when driving.

The Government is set to publish the results of a consultation which could advise increasing fines for mobile phone use from £100 and three penalty points.

A survey by Goodyear Tyres, as part of its Young Driver programme, found that 42% of 17 to 25-year-olds admitted to using their phone illegally within the last year – and nearly a quarter (23%) said they weren’t worried about being hit by a heavy fine for using their mobile while driving.

These statistics are supported by a survey carried out by the RAC – which found that, despite 52% of drivers welcoming an increase in penalties for mobile phone use, nearly a third (31%) said they felt it wouldn’t make any difference.

RAC spokesman Simon Williams said: “There is a very strong feeling from law-abiding motorists that something needs to be done to make drivers stop using their phones while driving. But while people want the penalties for committing this offence to be beefed up there is also an acceptance that nothing is likely to change due primarily to a lack of enforcement.

“From 2010 to 2015 England and Wales experienced a 27% decline in the number of roads police officers. The number of fixed penalty notices issued for using a handheld phone while driving reduced dramatically from a high of 125,500 in 2009 to 52,400 in 2012. In line with this, our own research has found that motorists believe there is little chance of being caught by a police officer (as opposed to a camera) for a driving offence.”

Goodyear’s research found that mobile phone use was the third most common distraction for young drivers – after eating and being distracted by something outside that caught their eye (such as passing a friend).

Of those surveyed, 29% admitted to calling or answering the phone, 28% said they have text a friend whilst behind the wheel, while one in ten admitted to using social media. 45% of the latter have searched newsfeeds or updated their Facebook status, while 32% have sent pictures using Snapchat.

Williams added: “In the 13 years since specific legislation was introduced making it illegal to use a handheld phone while driving, mobile phones have evolved into smartphones, and the increased features offered by apps and faster internet access has raised interaction among users to near addiction levels. While being glued to the screen of a mobile phone when walking is dangerous enough, doing the same thing at the wheel of a vehicle, even just occasionally is a recipe for disaster.

“Changing this behaviour will only come through a combination of actions. We need more rigorous enforcement of the law, increased penalties that act as a meaningful deterrent and a high profile advertising campaign that makes motorists fully aware of the serious consequences of using a handheld phone at the wheel of a vehicle.”

Honda servicing is top says Which?

Honda Civic

Hondacare Assistance is the best car maker breakdown service on the market reveals a new survey of Which? readers.

The firm’s recovery service scored 87 per cent and was awarded five out of five stars in both roadside repair and ‘within the hour’ arrival times.

It also came top of the overall rankings for arrival time, roadside repair rate and customer score.

Offered free to all new car buyers for the duration of the three-year warranty period, Hondacare Assistance is provided by the AA and includes home, roadside and recovery assistance. Features such as a replacement hire car for up to 72 hours are also included.

Nick Holmes, Head of Customer and Aftersales, said: “Our cars are made to last and provide the best performance possible and if something does goes wrong, we want to fix it as fast as we can, to get our customers on their way again.”

Not that buyers are likely to need it: earlier this year, Which? also ranked Honda the most reliable used car manufacturer…

Secondhand diesel cars most likely to have engine issues, warns AA

Secondhand diesel cars most likely to have engine issues, warns AA

Secondhand diesel cars most likely to have engine issues, warns AA

AA Vehicle Inspections has revealed that most faults they find on used diesel cars relate to the engine, which could result in costly repairs.

The service, which carries out pre-sale inspections for used car dealers, founds that 96% of faults found on diesel cars are to do with the engine – compared to just 64% on petrol cars.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, electric and hybrid cars were more likely to reveal electrical issues.

Alarmingly, vans are the most likely to have hidden faults, with 40% of AA vehicle inspectors saying that vans they inspected on the forecourt had the most problems.

AA Vehicle Inspections director, David Bruce, said: “A high number of our inspectors found more faults on vans at dealers than any other vehicle type. Identifying faults and providing feedback before vehicles are sold to customers helps dealers to improve their stock.”

The revelation comes after news that half of all vans fail their first MOT.

More than half of the inspectors surveyed revealed that a quarter of the vehicles they inspected had illegal or unsafe tyres.

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers' biggest gripes

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers' biggest gripes

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers' biggest gripes

Tailgating and using your phone behind the wheel are the habits most likely to annoy other drivers, a survey has revealed.

The survey by finance company Zuto has discovered that 84% of motorists are irritated by seeing other road users on their phones – while the same amount are annoyed by people driving too closely behind them.

Other grievances include drivers who don’t stop at zebra crossings (72%), driving too slowly (71%) and bad parking (68%).

Interestingly, that last point seems to be the one most of us seem to be ready to admit to struggling with – with more than a third (34%) of those questioned holding their hands up to poor parking. Surprisingly, one in 10 confess to parking in family spaces while travelling without children.

Meanwhile, 29% of us admit to speeding and more than one in 10 (14%) regularly drive too close to the car in front, stop in yellow box junctions or go too slowly.

Zuto CEO James Wilkinson said: ”As a nation we are very polite, but that doesn’t stop us secretly getting annoyed at other drivers, and with such poor practices on show it is easy to see why!”

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers' biggest gripes

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers’ biggest gripes

Tailgating and mobile phone use revealed as drivers' biggest gripes

Tailgating and using your phone behind the wheel are the habits most likely to annoy other drivers, a survey has revealed.

The survey by finance company Zuto has discovered that 84% of motorists are irritated by seeing other road users on their phones – while the same amount are annoyed by people driving too closely behind them.

Other grievances include drivers who don’t stop at zebra crossings (72%), driving too slowly (71%) and bad parking (68%).

Interestingly, that last point seems to be the one most of us seem to be ready to admit to struggling with – with more than a third (34%) of those questioned holding their hands up to poor parking. Surprisingly, one in 10 confess to parking in family spaces while travelling without children.

Meanwhile, 29% of us admit to speeding and more than one in 10 (14%) regularly drive too close to the car in front, stop in yellow box junctions or go too slowly.

Zuto CEO James Wilkinson said: ”As a nation we are very polite, but that doesn’t stop us secretly getting annoyed at other drivers, and with such poor practices on show it is easy to see why!”