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2020 Nissan Juke

2020 Nissan Juke review: Juke boxes clever

2020 Nissan Juke

The new Nissan Juke is a car with which the firm must have taken a deep breath before replacing. The 2010-vintage, we regularly were told on the Barcelona first drive, was the B-segment (industry-speak for supermini) crossover pioneer. Volkswagen T-Cross, Seat Arona, Peugeot 2008, Ford Puma, Skoda Kamiq – all (and so many more) owe their existence to the Juke. It ‘did a Qashqai’, a car sector below.

One million sales and nine years later, Juke 2.0 is here. And now Nissan has done a Range Rover Evoque: tried to improve the glaring failings of the old model (rear passenger space, boot space, fuel economy, interior quality, ride comfort, etc) without perfecting it to anonymity. Tough gig. See: Mini.

2020 Nissan Juke

Nissan admits the Juke is a Marmite car, and likes the fact some hate it. This one has even sharper creases and angles than the original, and a bolder front end that’s less cutesy than the first. Bizarrely, it’s somehow more Juke than the first one.

2020 Nissan Juke

It’s bigger on the outside, 75mm longer, with the space between the wheels extended even more. Result: far more space in the rear (watch your head as you step out, though) and the boot, sorely compromised on the original, is a commodious 422 litres (10 percent bigger than a VW Golf). Half the rear lights now rise up with the bootlid, so the opening is wider.

2020 Nissan Juke

The dashboard has been turned from cheap and plasticky into plush and premium. The stitched soft-touch surface is tactile, as is the leather steering wheel, and even the hard plastics elsewhere are less scratchy. The coloured plastic panel around the gearlever has gone; in comes more soft trim and ambient lighting. Much more upmarket.

2020 Nissan Juke

All but base-spec Visia have a crisp 8.0-inch touchscreen which looks less stuck on than some. It has Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and also communicates with a Nissan smartphone app. And with a Google Home device, so you can speak commands to it, or the kids can ask it to flash the lights and sound the horn, to their endless amusement.

This is a sector first and Nissan plans to further develop what you can do with and to your Juke through Google Home. There was even someone from Google on the launch event: watch this space, they tell us (and visit your dealer for a first hands-on of it). Other tech highlights are onboard wi-fi (you buy add-on data plans) and Bose ‘UltraNearField’ speakers built into the front seat headrests.

2020 Nissan Juke

It’s more grown up to sit in. Passengers look out over a high, wide bonnet, sat a bit taller than a normal car, cocooned confidently inside; you feel positioned deep within it, high sides and centre console protecting you. Visibility is better (the windscreen pillars are thinner) although the new Juke does feel a bit wider than before, which might initially affect in-town threadability.

It shouldn’t be a surprise to discover it drives in a more mature way. Gone is the old one’s rough ride, certainly on admittedly smooth Spanish roads. There’s more compliance, more comfort – which is particularly impressive as test cars had largest-possible 19-inch alloys. If this sort of comfort makes it to the UK, it will be one of the Juke’s biggest strengths: because big wheels are a must-have, right?

2020 Nissan Juke

Steering feels nice, less vague than before, and it handles in a measured way, not leaning too much or floating across twisting roads. Press a button by the gearlever to engage sport mode; it makes the steering heavier and the accelerator pedal snappier. It’s also makes the optional DCT automatic more eager; the other extreme, eco, keeps revs eco-low.

Gearbox type is the only mechanical option with the new Juke: all have a 117hp 1.0-litre DIG-T petrol engine (there won’t be a new Juke diesel). It’s a smooth and surprisingly charismatic engine, with a nice three-cylinder throb and commendable pull from low engine revs. Those trading up from the rough old 1.6-litre will be amazed by how much nicer to use this engine is.

Nissan’s sums say there’s 15 percent more performance, 30 percent less CO2. It averages from 45.6 to 47.9mpg, and the auto is only worse than the manual by 1.5mpg. The engine even has an overboost function: put your foot to the floor and you get a bit more surge for 25 seconds.

2020 Nissan Juke

I liked the six-speed manual. The high-mounted gearlever is snappy, yet the engine pulls up hills even if you can’t be bothered to change down. The seven-speed paddleshift auto was OK, with imperceptible gearshifts, but it often found itself in too high a gear on twisting roads, even in Sport mode. Brakes felt confident and there is a standard electronic handbrake, with hill-hold button.

The new Juke is refined, filtering out engine and road noise; Nissan said the window seals were not yet production spec, so it rustled a bit at speed, but was still otherwise OK. The structure feels more robust too – the trim doesn’t creak when you fly over rough surfaces – which adds to the premium, substantial impression. The long travel suspension’s supple ride also does this.

Nissan’s ProPilot driver assist is available (only available on autos, though). It gives steering-assist cruise control on motorways; it’s not a self-driving Juke, but it’s an early taste of one, and is an safety add-on, if still far from fully-formed.

2020 Nissan Juke

What’s not to like? At first glance, little. Nissan was worried about losing the old car’s agility, but the gains in comfort far outweigh any loss in the fun factor. Besides, I didn’t perceive any, particularly now the engine is far more pleasant.

Space in the back is finally fine, the boot’s usable, and cabin quality give it a pronounced lift. Visually, it’s still ‘Juke’; but new colours, much richer detailing and its extra size mean you won’t confuse new for old (or prefer old to new).  

2020 Nissan Juke

Unlike the first time, the new Juke doesn’t aim to surprise. It wants to satisfy, maintaining the original’s distinctiveness but adding the hygiene factors it lacked. It will be a nicer, easier car to live with, a safer one and, with its class-leading suite of tech, a smarter and more upgradable one.

Breathe easy, Nissan.

2020 Nissan Juke: specs

Engine: 1.0 DIG-T 117

Power: 117hp

0-62mph: 10.4 seconds

Top speed: 112 mph

Fuel economy: 45.6-47.9 mpg

CO2: 112-118 g/km

Size (l/w/h): 4,210 / 1,800 / 1,595 mm

Boot size: 422-1,305 litres

2020 Nissan Juke prices (November 2019)

1.0 DIG-T 117

  • Visia: £17,395
  • Acenta: £18,995
  • N-Connecta: £20,995
  • Tekna: £22,495
  • Tekna+: £23,895
  • Premiere Edition: £23,995

DCT automatic: + £1,400 (not available on Visia)

2020 Nissan Juke: in pictures

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

2020 Nissan Juke first look: the all-new original

All-new 2019 Nissan JukeThe Nissan Juke singlehandedly invented the marketplace for small crossover SUVs when it was introduced in 2010. Now, almost a decade on, Nissan has released an all-new second generation version.

With challengers from every major rival, Nissan knows it won’t have things quite so easy this time round. So the new Juke is packed full of technology to give it the best possible chance of success.

Built in Sunderland, the new Juke is on sale now from £17,395. Deliveries begin from the end of November 2019.

All-new landmark

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

Visually, it’s derived from the original landmark model. But it has grown up, gaining in length width and height. Now over 4.2 metres long, the benefits are found inside, with a vast 5.8cm more rear kneeroom, and 1.1cm more headroom.

The boot, a glaring weakness of the original, is 20 percent larger, with a total capacity of 422 litres. That’s bigger than a Volkswagen Golf.

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

The curves of the original Juke have been given an edge, and it now appears a sharper, less cutesy design. It has a more planted stance and much more aggressive front end.

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

Ultra-slim headlights are distinctive and the high-mounted driving lamps of the first Juke have been turned into LED running lights seemingly modelled on a fidget spinner. Every model, even the base car, gets full LED lights as standard.

Much-improved interior

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

Inside, the plasticky dashboard has become more premium-looking, with a high-mounted touchscreen and greater use of soft-touch trims. The motorcycle-style centre console has been toned down, but we can’t imagine Juke owners minding too much now the novelty has worn off.

The extra space, comfort, technology and refinement will all be a pronounced step on over the nine-year-old current model.

That all-new NissanConnect 8.0-inch touchscreen has Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality, TomTom Maps and onboard Wi-Fi hotspot. This is fitted to every model above the base Visia.

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

There’s a remote app so owners can check how much fuel is in their tank from their smartphone, and whether their new Juke is locked or not.

It’s even compatible with Google Assistant. Nissan says owners can talk to their smart device and control lights and central locking, and send navigation destinations via voice control.

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

Tech fans will also like the Bose Personal Plus optional sound system. This has eight speakers – including two ‘UltraNearfield’ units built into the front head restraints, for “immersive music in ultra-clear definition’.

All-new underneath

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

The new Juke is built on an all-new platform that’s stiffer and safer than before. Despite being much larger, it’s actually 23kg lighter. At launch, just a single 1.0-litre three-cylinder DiG-T turbo petrol engine will be offered. This produces 117hp and is paired with either a six-speed manual or seven-speed DCT automatic.

0-62mph takes 10.4 seconds and it will do 112mph flat-out. Nissan doesn’t yet know how economical it is, nor what the final homologated CO2 figures will be.

16-inch steel wheels will be fitted to the base Visia model; Acenta and N-Connecta will get 17-inch alloys, with Tekna and Tekna+ featuring 19-inch alloys – among the largest in the small SUV sector.

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

Nissan ProPilot tech (and the ‘blue button’ on the steering wheel) offers auto-assist steering, acceleration and braking, to make driving less stressful in single-lane highway driving.

This will be the first small SUV to offer blind spot intervention: if the driver attempts to change lane with a car in their blind spot, the new Juke will steer away from danger.

Nissan has sold almost one million Jukes since its introduction in 2010. “The new design and exciting driving experience will appeal to the growing number of customers opting for compact crossovers,” said Nissan Europe product planning boss Ponz Pandikuthira.

“The Juke has grown up, while still retaining the fun-to-drive qualities that have always made it stand out.”

2020 Nissan Juke prices

All-new 2019 Nissan Juke

DiG-T 117 petrol engine

  • Visia: £17,395
  • Acenta: £18,995
  • N-Connecta: £20,995
  • Tekna: £22,495
  • Tekna+: £23,895
  • Premiere Edition: £23,995

(DCT auto: + £1,400 on all grades apart from Visia)

2020 Nissan Juke: in pictures

New 2020 Nissan Juke teaser

The new 2020 Nissan Juke is coming: everything we know

New 2020 Nissan JukeNissan’s successful Juke crossover has been on sale since 2010 and is ripe for a replacement. The firm has now told us to save the date of September 3rd: the all-new 2020 Nissan Juke will be revealed. 

The current Juke remains a head-turner on the road, thanks to its distinctive styling that borrows more than a little from Nissan’s Z-badged sports cars.

At launch, it was the world’s first modern small crossover, and its characterful lines have kept it competitive in an increasingly crowded sector.

New 2020 Nissan Juke teaser

The new car should build on this, while bringing in some other more contemporary Nissan styling elements, such as the ‘V-Motion’ grille. Imagine classic Juke tropes in combination with elements from some of the marque’s latest concepts, such as the GT-R 2020 Vision Gran Turismo and Gripz. 

It was one of the first cars of this type to scatter its lighting across the front end, with the day-running lights living up top. On the new car, while the shape is classic Juke, the lighting will be as zany as the rest of the design.

The Clio’s Japanese crossover cousin?

New 2020 Nissan Juke

The previous Juke shared much of its underpinnings with the fourth-generation Renault Clio that followed it. The hot Nismo version got the Renault Sport Clio’s engine, and even a manual gearbox (when the Clio sadly went without). 

The new car will share the latest Clio and Captur’s CMF-B (common module family) platform. The new car will gain 106 mm in its wheelbase, which should make for a near class-leading cabin for roominess. Expect better legroom in the back, a bigger boot, plus higher quality materials and an impressive arsenal of tech. 

Given how long-lived the current Juke has been, the new one should be geared up to the gills. Reports from those that have driven early prototypes suggest that Apple CarPlay and Android Auto will be available on an 8-inch touch screen. Wifi will also be available via an embedded 4G SIM.

New 2020 Nissan Juke

The only engine at launch will be the Micra’s 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol with 117hp, while manual and dual-clutch automatic gearboxes will be available.

As for electrified variants? We’d bet folding money that a plug-in variant will be out before long, not dissimilar to the imminent Captur PHEV. An all-electric variant is also possible.