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David Beckham’s Range Rover for sale – at one-sixth of original price

Coys 100 car spectacular

A selection of cars from famous owners are up for auction in the Coys ‘100 Car Spectacular’ at the London Classic Car Show.

Highlights include David Beckham’s old Range Rover Sport, a 1995 Lotus Elan once owned by Prince Charles, a 1967 Vanden Plas Princess R used by British Prime Minister Harold Wilson and 1960s singer (and friend of The Beatles) Cilla Black’s modified Mini.

The Beckham Range Rover is a 2007 Sport 4.2 Supercharged with Kahn styling and what is described as a ‘highly unique’ interior. Although it would have cost nigh-on £200,000 ($260,000) when new (including modifications), estimates suggest it won’t go for more than £35,000 ($45,000). Taste wins out over provenance, just…

Coys 100 car spectacular

The Lotus Elan is a 1995 M100 Series 2 and was accepted on behalf of the Prince’s Trust by Prince Charles. Aside from the Royal connection, it has Lotus-flavoured significance of its own, being the 50,000th car to leave the factory since 1948. It’s signed by all the Lotus employees from the time and was donated to the trust by former Lotus driver, Britt Ekland. It could fetch £20,000 ($26,000).

The Vanden Plas Princess R – perhaps one of the most interesting cars in the 100 Car Spectacular – is not the Austin Princess with Vanden Plas trimmings that you might be imagining. This collaboration between Rolls-Royce and BMC was quite the oddity, but it was driven by Prime Minister Harold Wilson. It’s possessed of a good history file and a new MOT. Coys estimates a sale price of up to £20,000 ($26,000).

Coys 100 car spectacular

Finally, for around £40,000 (just over $51,000) you could pick up Cilla Black’s old Mark IV Mini 1000, bought for her by Bob Willis. Owned by Black, it was upgraded by Wood & Pickett of Abbey Road, London. Additions include bigger wheelarches, Margrave leather and a walnut dash. Positively plush and befitting of Cilla.

“We have a spectacular auction which will be part of the London Classic Car Show at the Excel Centre in London next week and to have amazing cars associated with royalty, government, sport and show business is the icing on the cake,” said Chris Routledge, MD at Coys.

The auction takes place over two days at the show – Saturday 16th and Sunday 17th February 2019. There’s plenty more noteworthy machinery to get bidding on, including a Porsche Carrera GT, a Maserati Tipo 60/61 ‘Birdcage’ and a 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Series V.

Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

Modern classics at the Coys spring saleRight now, cars from the 80s and 90s are hot property, as motorists dig deep to secure a so-called modern classic. We’ve been through the auction catalogue for the forthcoming Coys Spring Classics sale to highlight the cars that are likely to be in demand.

The auction takes place at the Royal Horticultural Society in London on 12 April 2017.

Lamborghini LM002: £140,000 – £180,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

The Lamborghini LM002 could be classed as the godfather of the modern performance SUV – part Rambo, part Carl Lewis. Thanks to its marine-spec 7.2-litre V12 engine, the ‘Rambo Lambo’ could pummel its way to 62mph in 7.8 seconds, flattening sports cars as it made its way to the nearest mountain.

According to Coys, this 1991 example took part in the 2006 Gumball Rally, but don’t let that put you off. Buy it and out-trump all those wannabe performance SUVs in the Waitrose car park.

Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6: £130,000 – £160,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

The Porsche 964 Turbo with the 3.6-litre engine is one of the most coveted of all the 911 models. Not to be confused with the earlier 3.3 Turbo, the 3.6 developed 360hp and 385lb ft of torque, and fewer than 1,500 were built.

This left-hand-drive example has 79,000km on the clock and is finished in Guards Red, which is good for an extra horsepower or two.

AC Cobra MkIV: £120,000 – £150,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

Thanks to Brooklands-based Autokraft, this performance hero of the 1960s was dragged by its ladder frame chassis into the 1980s. This was no mere replica: Brian Angliss negotiated with AC for the right to build the Cobra using the original jigs and dies. Sadly, Autokraft wasn’t permitted to call it a ‘Cobra’. The official title is the AC MkIV, which sounds far less evocative.

In 1984, Angliss told Motor Sport magazine the MkIV was “what the AC would be today, if it had remained in production”. New, the reborn Cobra would have set you back around £30,000, with customers free to chose a Ford V8 engine of their choice. This 1989 example has covered a mere 7,500 miles from new.

Porsche 993 Turbo: £80,000 – £100,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

The 993 Turbo represents the crossroads for the Porsche 911, signalling the end of the air-cooled era. It was also the first Porsche Turbo with all-wheel drive, which may have upset the purists. Today, it’s one of the most sought-after 911s on the market.

Which is why a six-figure sum isn’t out of the question for this 1995 example. The first owner kept it until 2016 and there are 32,000 miles on the clock.

Aston Martin V8: £75,000 – £95,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

For almost two decades, this was Aston Martin’s core product. Launched in 1972, the V8 was an evolution of the earlier DBS, notable for the single headlights and revised front grille. As a 1974 car, this V8 features four twin-choke Weber carburettors, rather than the Bosch mechanical fuel injection carried over from the DBS.

“This is a beautiful thoroughbred GT car which offers strong investment potential for the future,” said Coys.

Ferrari Testarossa: £65,000 – £75,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

Perhaps the glamorous surroundings of the Paris Lido and a bevy of dancing guys was designed to draw attention away from the Testarossa’s dramatic styling. This was the launch venue for the ‘Red Head’, which introduced a new styling direction for Ferrari, most notably the slatted air intakes and horizontal grille covering the rear lights.

Ferrari needn’t have worried, because some 7,177 units were sold before the Testarossa made way for the 512 TR. As a 1991 example, this is one of the final original Testarossas off the line.

Ferrari 308 GTB: £60,000 – £70,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

The Ferrari 308 GTB made its debut at the 1975 Paris Motor Show – the first production Ferrari to feature a fibreglass body. However, Ferrari returned to pressed steel and aluminium in 1976 for US cars, and 1977 for European models.

According to Coys, one of this example’s former owners used it to commute from the UK to Rome, while more recently it was owned by the former editor of Car magazine.

Ferrari 308 GTSI: £60,000 – £70,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

The 308 GTS arrived two years after the GTB, making its debut at the 1977 Frankfurt Motor Show. Although the S stood for Spider, the 308 GTS sported a targa top, which could be stored behind the seats.

Bosch fuel injection was introduced in 1980, hence the ‘I’ in GTSI, but this only served to rob power in the name of emissions. This 1981 example was delivered new to America and according to Coys it “has to be seen to be believed”

Porsche 930 3.3 Turbo: £55,000 – £65,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

In its day, the Porsche 930 Turbo was one of the fastest cars in the world, but it wasn’t for the fainthearted. The 3.3-litre version boasted a top speed of 160mph and required a fair amount of patience, as the KKK turbocharger was known for its… wait for it… lag.

Amazingly, somebody spent $50,000 improving this American import, and it has covered a mere 3,000 miles since a complete engine rebuild in 2012.

Ferrari F355: £50,000 – £60,000Modern classics at the Coys spring sale

Thanks to research conducted by Pininfarina, the Ferrari F355 was an extremely aerodynamic car, with highlights including the side air intakes and flat bottom. It was powered by a 3.5-litre V8 engine developing 380hp.

The president of the Italian Ferrari owners’ club bought this example new in 1995, before it was brought over to the UK in 2015.

Richard Hammond’s £750 Porsche up for auction

Richard Hammond’s £750 Porsche up for auction

Richard Hammond’s £750 Porsche up for auction

The Coys Autosport sale is billed as ‘an important auction of Grand Prix, competition, touring and rally cars,’ and it’ll set the tone for another year of classic car auctions.

We’ve selected our favourite cars from the sale, which takes place at Autosport International on 14 January 2017. Read on to discover which cars have made our top 20.

Porsche 924: No reserve

“This is a very rare chance to buy a piece of British television motoring history.” That’s according to Coys, which is auctioning this Porsche 924 without an MOT and with no reserve. Fans of Top Gear will recognise this flame-enriched 924 as Richard Hammond’s choice in ‘The £1,500 Porsche Challenge’.

Hammond bought the 924 for £750 and was most excited about the fact that “the lights pop up!” The black bonnet, flames, and numbers were added later, but according to James May they simply gave the car “sporting credentials it didn’t deserve”. At the end of the show, Hammond was forced to admit he couldn’t sell the car. It hasn’t been MOTd since March 2010…

Dino 246 GT: £250,000 – £280,000

The Dino 246 GT arrived in 1969 – a replacement for the 206 GT. The big news was the installation of a 2.4-litre V6 engine, along with steel body panels. It is perhaps most famous for its role in the TV series The Persuaders!, with Danny Wilde (played by Tony Curtis) driving a left-hand drive example.

This is one of the very last right-hand drive models imported between 1969 and 1974, having left the factory in July 1973. At a Historics at Brooklands auction in November 2016, a 1972 Dino 246 GT failed to sell with a pre-auction estimate of £260,000 – £300,000.

Bentley Continental: £90,000 – £110,000

Bentley Continental: £90,000 - £110,000

You could roll around the globe in a 1985 Bentley Continental Convertible, as Sir Elton John so nearly sang in his 1985 hit Nikita. This was the car owned and driven by the ‘Rocket Man’ in the video which accompanied the song, which peaked at number three in the UK singles chart.

In February 2015, this very car sold for £68,779 at an auction in Paris, but is expected to sell for between £90,000 and £110,000 at Autosport International. It comes complete with its original B20 ELT registration mark.

Vauxhall Chevette HSR: £60,000 – £80,000

In standard guise, the road-going Vauxhall Chevette was powered by the 1256cc from a Viva, but it was clear that it could handle more power. Unfortunately, General Motors wasn’t keen, so it was left to the Vauxhall dealer network to spearhead a rally programme. The result was the Chevette HSR.

This is the car driven by Pentti Airikkala, a driver well equipped to get the best from this 2.3-litre, rear-wheel-drive rally hero. Back in the day, the not-so-small matter of 250hp made the Chevette quite a weapon.

Mini Cooper S: £40,000 – £60,000

This 1966 Mini Cooper S made its RAC Rally debut in the same year, with Paddy Hopkirk behind the wheel. He was the leading British driver until a broken drive shaft coupling forced him out of the race. On the Circuit of Ireland, the transmission differential failed, bringing a premature end to a fierce battle between Hopkirk and Roger Clark in a Ford Escort.

In his book on Mini Coopers, Graham Robson described JMO 969D as “not a lucky car”, but with likes of Hopkirk and Timo Makinen listed as previous drivers, it’s not without provenance. It was also used as a publicity car for the use of seatbelts.

Porsche 912 Outlaw: £45,000 – £55,000

Porsche 912 Outlaw: £45,000 - £55,000

Fat Performance is a Californian-based company with over 40 years of history of rebuilding and servicing Porsche air-cooled engines. The company was responsible for rebuilding this 912’s 2.7-litre engine and treating it to a host of upgrades.

The current owner imported it from the USA in 2010 and, according to Coys, “the engine cracks and pops on overrun and will turn heads wherever it goes”. It’s certainly a strong look.

Honda Accord BTCC: £50,000 – £70,000

The Honda Accord – safe, dependable, reliable, worthy. The kind of car driven by your elderly uncle in Eastbourne. Suffice to say, this is not your average Honda Accord. As diehard fans of the British Touring Car Championship will testify, this is a bit of an animal.

Car number 50, driven by Peter Kox, finished 12th overall, with James Thompson in the other works Honda Sport Accord finishing third. The most expensive Accord to be sold in 2017? We’ll see.

Talbot Samba Group B: £25,000 – £30,000

There could be as few as 20 Talbot Sambas left on the road, with half of them being cabriolets. Whatever, we doubt any will be as desirable, not to mention valuable, as this Group B rally car. It many ways, it was the warm-up act for the Peugeot 205 T16, which would go on to enjoy tremendous success.

This example was built by Castelos Motorsport in Group B specification, including the engine, gearbox, limited slip diff, competition wiring loom, hydraulic handbrake and modern brakes. It’s probably one of the rarest rally cars you’ll see at auction this year.

Ford Escort RS1800: £80,000 – £110,000

Ford Escort RS1800: £80,000 - £110,000

Ford was a dominant force in rallying during the late 70s and early 80s, but its success was brought to a halt by the arrival of Audi and four-wheel drive. This car was first used by the Ford works team on the San Remo Rally in 1977, with driver Bjorn Waldegard finishing fifth overall. Two years later, Waldegard would win the Championship in another RS1800.

Ford sold the car in 1979, but it remained active at the hands of privateers. It was later painted red and yellow, before a British enthusiast traced it to a location in mainland France. Today, VHK 74S is said to have been restored to its original specification.

Porsche 964 Carrera 2 RWB: £65,000 – £75,000

RWB stands for Rauh Welt Begriff, a company known for producing mild and timid looking Porsches. Actually, scrub that, Rauh Welt Begriff – owned by Akira Nakai – is responsible for some of the most outrageous cars on the planet.

This 1989 964 features a “full RWB Type body” and certainly isn’t a car for shrinking violets. Despite being race-prepared and “largely a racing car”, it is road legal and has an MOT until May 2017.

Fiat Coupe 16v Turbo: £15,000 – £20,000

Visit a Fiat dealer armed with a little over £20,000 and you could drive away in a new 124 Spider. Alternatively, take the same amount of cash to Autosport International and you could drive home in an unregistered Fiat Coupe. Actually, the ‘drive home’ bit is a little misleading, as you’ll need a trailer for an unregistered car.

This is one of 15 pre-production cars built by Pininfarina as proof of manufacturer and it has just 825 miles on the clock. Having spent most of its life as part of the Pininfarina collection, it was then bought by an Italian in 2012. While we’d prefer the later 20v Turbo, opportunities like this don’t come along very often.

Ford GT40 Evocation: £45,000 – £60,000

Ford GT40 Evocation: £45,000 - £60,000

One of two Ford GT40 Evocation models at the Coys auction, this one caught our eye. That’s probably got something to do with the Gulf Racing colours.

Genuine GT40s are essentially priceless, meaning a replica is probably the only opportunity to get behind the wheel of one of the most famous racing cars of all-time. Get the Jacky Ickx look for the price of a Porsche 718 Cayman S.

Facel Vega HK500: £90,000 – £130,000

Few cars offer as much charm and elegance as a Facel Vega HK500, a car owned by royalty, artists, musicians and racing drivers. Powered by a Chrysler V8 engine, these French-built beauties were designed with the export market in mind.

First registered in July 1960, this HK500 was delivered new to a shoe manufacturing company in Dudley. Not that there’s anything cobblers about owning one of the coolest cars of the 20th century.

Porsche 993 Cup: £120,000 – £220,000

Is the 993 the most desirable of all the Porsche 911 models? Some would say so, and the values certainly reflect this. Take this 1996 Porsche 993 Cup, which is offered with a curiously wide-ranging pre-auction estimate of between £120,000 and £220,000.

It was built for the 1996/97 Porsche Supercup series and driven by Bernard Simmenauer. It was later sold to a Swiss gentleman.

Range Rover: £18,000 – £22,000

Range Rover: £18,000 - £22,000

Few off-roaders have aged as well as the original Range Rover, especially in three-door guise. In fact, we’d say that only the Jeep Wagoneer can rival it in terms of timeless appeal and off-road credentials.

This is a 1971 car, making it a very early model, and one that just happened to be delivered new to the Goodwood Estate. You could spend upwards of £30,000 on an Evoque. We’d rather buy a classic Range Rover.

Aston Martin DB7: £28,000 – £35,000

Aside from a Cygnet – which isn’t a true AM – the DB7 remains the cheapest and most realistic entry-point to the Aston Martin brand. Forget all the nonsense about its Jaguar origins, because the DB7 is one of the best looking cars ever built.

This 1995 car has covered a mere 18,400 since new.

Bentley MkVI: £110,000 – £140,000

One of the most expensive lots in the Coys sale, this Bentley MkVI special was built in the style of a 4.5 Litre Tourer and finished in British Racing Green.

The engine is from a later 6.75-litre V8 Bentley and mated to the original MkIV four-speed gearbox. According to Coys, “its automotive styling is a guaranteed centre of attention at any of the most prestigious motoring events”.

Mazda MX-5: £8,000 – £10,000

Mazda MX-5: £8,000 - £10,000

You might look at the pre-auction estimate for this Mazda MX-5 before muttering something about crazy classic car prices. And, sure enough, £10,000 is a huge chunk of cash for a first-generation MX-5. But let’s look at the evidence…

It’s a very early UK car. It has covered just 17,025 miles. The MOT history is almost unblemished. And it’s probably one of the nicest examples we’ve seen in a while. Given the prices achieved by other modern classics, you wouldn’t bet against a mighty sale price.

Ford Escort RS2000: £18,000 – £23,000

If the price of the Ford Escort RS1800 was a little too rich for you, this might be the next best thing. The RS2000 was introduced in 1976 and was powered by a 2.0-litre engine. When mated to the Escort’s lightweight body, it became quite a formidable force.

The ‘droop snoot’ ensured the RS2000 was one of the most memorable cars of the 1970s. This 1978 car lived in South Africa until 2014, meaning it will have escaped the ravages of numerous British winters. A snip at £23,000…

Porsche 911 2.4 S Targa: £75,000 – £90,000

In truth, this 1973 Porsche 911 had us at yellow headlights. It was delivered new in Germany and restored in 1990.

Remember, the Coys auction takes place at Autosport International on Saturday 14 January 2017. Admission is by catalogue only.

Peter Grant’s Ferrari Dino 246 GTS heads to auction

Peter Grant Dino 246 GTS

Peter Grant was one of the most respected, revered and indeed feared rock group managers of the 20th century. He is best remembered for the creation and management of Led Zeppelin, the rock group that reigned supreme from 1968 to 1980.

In 1973, when Grant took delivery of this Ferrari Dino 246 GTS, Led Zeppelin were one of the biggest rock bands in the world. Dazed and Confused, Whole Lotta Love, Immigrant Song, Black Dog and, of course, Stairway to Heaven, had already graced jukeboxes and record players across the globe.

Grant had therefore earned the right to splash the cash. Not that he was known for a public display of his vast wealth. His obituary in the Independent – Grant died in 1995 – spoke of thrift and second-hand furniture. An excerpt from the obituary reads as follows:

Grant rarely wore a suit and often turned up in a first class lounge wearing an old T-shirt and a coonskin hat. His gloomy offices in King’s Road in London were stocked with second-hand furniture. He said, “I don’t need to put on a show. It’s all b******t. The only thing that impresses people is Led Zeppelin’s music. I don’t need a fancy office.”

Clearly, Grant needed a fancy car. Back in 1973, the Dino 246 GTS commanded a list price of £6,620.39 plus delivery charges, number plates and road tax. But Grant didn’t stop there, adding non-metallic paint and leather upholstery for a combined £274.09.

Today, Coys – which is auctioning the Dino on 8 September – have slapped a £350,000 – £400,000 estimate on the car. The question is: who is going to Bring it on Home?

What Peter Grant would make of the pre-auction estimate is up for debate. He famously campaigned for rock stars to receive their fair share of the profits, going as far as trashing bootleg copies of Led Zeppelin albums. The contract he secured with Atlantic Records was unprecedented.

Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

Grant, a larger than life character in more ways than one, must have cut a mean figure at the wheel of the Dino. The GTS – an open version of the 246 GT – was launched a year earlier at the 1972 Geneva Motor Show and is easy to spot thanks to the omission of the rear quarter windows.

Relatively speaking, the GTS was even more popular than the GT. Between 1969 and 1974, a total of 2,487 GTs were produced, compared with 1,274 GTS models between 1972 and 1974. The closed Dino 246 GT had been thrust into the public’s consciousness following its role in the hit TV series The Persuaders.

Chris Routledge, CEO of Coys, said: “London is filled with mythical places reminding us of the city’s rock n’ roll and music legacy. Swan Song Records was Led Zeppelin’s own record label, overseen by Peter Grant and used by the band to promote its own products as well as sign new upcoming artists.

“It’s not hard to imagine Peter Grant driving the Dino around Chelsea and parking it outside the studio back in the day, before meeting with the band.”

The Dino 246 GTS will be auctioned as part of the Coys auction at Fontwell House on 8 September 2016. You can find the house Over the Hills and Far Away on the Sussex Downs. If you’ve got a Whole Lotta Love for Grant’s old Dino, you know what to do.

But we won’t Ramble On.

Peter Grant's Ferrari Dino 246 GTS heads to auction

Peter Grant Dino 246 GTS

Peter Grant was one of the most respected, revered and indeed feared rock group managers of the 20th century. He is best remembered for the creation and management of Led Zeppelin, the rock group that reigned supreme from 1968 to 1980.

In 1973, when Grant took delivery of this Ferrari Dino 246 GTS, Led Zeppelin were one of the biggest rock bands in the world. Dazed and Confused, Whole Lotta Love, Immigrant Song, Black Dog and, of course, Stairway to Heaven, had already graced jukeboxes and record players across the globe.

Grant had therefore earned the right to splash the cash. Not that he was known for a public display of his vast wealth. His obituary in the Independent – Grant died in 1995 – spoke of thrift and second-hand furniture. An excerpt from the obituary reads as follows:

Grant rarely wore a suit and often turned up in a first class lounge wearing an old T-shirt and a coonskin hat. His gloomy offices in King’s Road in London were stocked with second-hand furniture. He said, “I don’t need to put on a show. It’s all b******t. The only thing that impresses people is Led Zeppelin’s music. I don’t need a fancy office.”

Clearly, Grant needed a fancy car. Back in 1973, the Dino 246 GTS commanded a list price of £6,620.39 plus delivery charges, number plates and road tax. But Grant didn’t stop there, adding non-metallic paint and leather upholstery for a combined £274.09.

Today, Coys – which is auctioning the Dino on 8 September – have slapped a £350,000 – £400,000 estimate on the car. The question is: who is going to Bring it on Home?

What Peter Grant would make of the pre-auction estimate is up for debate. He famously campaigned for rock stars to receive their fair share of the profits, going as far as trashing bootleg copies of Led Zeppelin albums. The contract he secured with Atlantic Records was unprecedented.

Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

Grant, a larger than life character in more ways than one, must have cut a mean figure at the wheel of the Dino. The GTS – an open version of the 246 GT – was launched a year earlier at the 1972 Geneva Motor Show and is easy to spot thanks to the omission of the rear quarter windows.

Relatively speaking, the GTS was even more popular than the GT. Between 1969 and 1974, a total of 2,487 GTs were produced, compared with 1,274 GTS models between 1972 and 1974. The closed Dino 246 GT had been thrust into the public’s consciousness following its role in the hit TV series The Persuaders.

Chris Routledge, CEO of Coys, said: “London is filled with mythical places reminding us of the city’s rock n’ roll and music legacy. Swan Song Records was Led Zeppelin’s own record label, overseen by Peter Grant and used by the band to promote its own products as well as sign new upcoming artists.

“It’s not hard to imagine Peter Grant driving the Dino around Chelsea and parking it outside the studio back in the day, before meeting with the band.”

The Dino 246 GTS will be auctioned as part of the Coys auction at Fontwell House on 8 September 2016. You can find the house Over the Hills and Far Away on the Sussex Downs. If you’ve got a Whole Lotta Love for Grant’s old Dino, you know what to do.

But we won’t Ramble On.

Thoroughbreds under starter’s orders at the Coys of Ascot sale

We select 25 of our favourite cars on offer at this weekend’s Coys of Ascot sale

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Keith Richards Bentley

Marrakesh Express: Bentley owned by Keith Richards up for sale

Keith Richards BentleyIf this Bentley S3 Continental ‘Flying Spur’ could talk, oh the stories it would have to tell. It was owned by legendary Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, who – it must be said – wasn’t your average careful owner.

Richards’s old Bentley – nicknamed ‘Blue Lena’ – has seen it all. It was central to a stereotypical rock and roll lifestyle, filled with sex, drugs and the occasional crash.

Keith Richards named it ‘Blue Lena’ after American jazz singer Lena Horne. Richards even set Lena a photo of his blue Bentley.

Keith Richards Bentley

Richards clearly loved his Bentley, as it was the most talked about vehicle in his 2010 autobiography, Life. In the book, he claimed ‘Blue Lena had carried us on many an acid-fuelled journey’.

Indeed, it was one such ‘acid-fuelled journey’ which led to the relationship between Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg. The pair were together between 1967 and 1979 and had three children.

Keith Richards Bentley

It was in 1967 when Keith Richards fled to Marrakesh in the Bentley S3 Continental. He was joined by fellow band member Brian Jones, Anita Pallenberg and American model Deborah Dixon. At the start of the journey, Pallenberg was the girlfriend of Brian Jones.

Brian Jones was taken ill with suspected pneumonia and didn’t complete the trip in the Bentley. This was where the romance between Richards and Pallenberg began. In his book, Richards revealed that “Anita made the first move”.

Keith Richards Bentley

It’s probably thanks to the amount of drugs consumed by Richards that he was unable to pinpoint the exact moment things turned intimate on the back seat of the Bentley. “Somewhere between Barcelona and Valencia”, was all Richards could remember.

Keith Richards Bentley

Only 87 Bentley S4 Continental ‘Flying Spur’ modes were ever built, but we suspect only one was later modified to include a secret compartment to conceal the band’s illegal drugs.

Keith Richards Bentley

It’s no coincidence that Keith Richards chose Marrakesh for his long-distance drive in the Bentley. This was a place where drugs were freely available, so the travellers were only to pleased to embark on a cross-continent drive.

In the famous drugs raid at his home in Sussex – an estate he still owns – Richards was said to be so high on LSD, he mistook the police for a group of uniformed dwarves and welcomed them into his home with open arms.

In the biography written by Victor Bockris, it was claimed that Richards would often start “nodding out” at the wheel, leading Anita to nudge him and shout “Keith!”, at which point he would snap out of it.

Keith Richards Bentley

“It was a car meant to be driven fast at night, “ Richards said, in is autobiography. “Having this car was already heading for trouble, breaking the rules of the establishment, driving a car I was definitely not born in to.”

Keith Richards Bentley

This view of the Bentley, combined with the drugs, inevitably led to some crashes. Friends recalled that “he’d just bounce off everything. He just didn’t care. We’d all be sitting there in the car and everybody would say ‘Oh, I think we just hit a tree’”.

Anita persuaded Richards to buy a 19-foot long Nazi staff car, rumoured to be owned by Hermann Göring. He crashed it on the first drive, restored it, then crashed it again.

Taking a bend at high speed, Richards crashed into a kerb, ricocheted across the road and rolled down the embankment. The Mercedes was a write-off and Anita – who was six months pregnant at the time – suffered a fractured collarbone.

Keith Richards Bentley

Of his Bentley, Richards said “It had a huge bonnet and to turn it, you really had to swing it about. Blue Lena required some art and knowledge of its contours in tight situations”.

Keith Richards Bentley

“It was six inches wider at the back than the front. You got to know your car, no doubt about that. Three tons of machinery”, continued Richards in his autobiography.

In 2010, Keith Richards revealed that he once went on a three-day road across the UK with John Lennon. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the pair could remember little about the journey…

Keith Richards Bentley

Richards told the News Of The World “we must have been on something exceptional”, before claiming “there was one young lady with us at least, and a chauffeur, because we were in no driving condition. And we were just playing sounds.”

Keith Richards Bentley

“We were in my Bentley. I said ‘I’m not going on a trip with you in that goddam psychedelic Rolls-Royce. Let’s go more discreetly in my little blue Bentley’.”

Keith Richards Bentley

As you’d expect, the Bentley didn’t emerge from the drug-fuelled lifestyle totally unscathed. Following a gig at Knebworth in 1976, Richards crashed the car into a field. There were seven occupants on board, all of whom suffered a few cuts and bruises.

Keith Richards Bentley

Following the crash, Keith Richards was arrested for carrying acid, so clearly the police had become wise to the whereabouts of the secret compartment.

Keith Richards Bentley

Richards recalled a bloody handprint remained on the backseat, as well as a dent where his nose had hit the dashboard. He was disappointed to discover the dent had disappeared when the car was repaired.

Each member of the Rolling Stones had their own statement vehicle, with Mick Jagger famously owning an Aston Martin DB6. Ever the flamboyant character, Jagger also owned a Morgan.

Keith Richards Bentley

In comparison, the Bentley S3 Continental ‘Flying Spur’ seems more gentlemanly. Definitely more discreet and tasteful. The perfect antidote to Keith Richards’s wild and frenzied character.

Keith Richards Bentley

Bonhams expects the Bentley to sell for between £400,000 and £600,000, a price given a boost by its famous history. Needless to say it has been restored since the days under the stewardship of Keith Richards.

Keith Richards Bentley

The restoration was said to be completed over the course of five years. Goodness knows what they found under the carpets and beneath the seats.

Keith Richards Bentley

The Goodwood Revival Sale takes place on the 12 September in Chichester, West Sussex, not far from the Redlands estate belonging to Keith Richards himself.