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Chrysler Australia 300 SRT Pacer Tribute

Chrysler Australia makes special tribute to legendary 1969 sedan

Chrysler Australia 300 SRT Pacer Tribute

Chrysler is helping celebrate its Australian history, with a special one-off version of the modern 300 sedan.

Five decades after the original Chrysler Valiant Pacer was launched, inspiration from it has been applied to one of the last affordable V8-powered four-doors in Australia. 

Although only a concept at present, Chrysler promises that a limited run of production cars will follow in the near future for Australian customers. 

True blue, or red, or yellow, Australian

Chrysler Australia 300 SRT Pacer TributeLaunched in 1969, the VF Valiant was an upgraded version of the third-generation of Chrysler’s full-size sedan range. Key changes for the VF Valiant included new body panels, along with the addition of a two-door hardtop model. 

However, the biggest change came with the introduction of the performance Pacer model. Aimed at offering affordable speed, the VF Valiant Pacer used a 225-cubic inch six-cylinder engine, producing 130 kW (174 horsepower). 

The Valiant Pacer was fitted with a three-speed manual transmission and capable of a 112 mph top speed. Special Pacer decals, and a choice of three paint options including ‘Wild Yellow’ helped mark it out.

Modern style, traditional values

Chrysler Australia 300 SRT Pacer TributeThe legend of the Valiant Pacer helped cement in Australian automotive culture, and one which deserves to be commemorated.

For the 300 SRT Pacer tribute car, Chrysler has added the classic Wild Yellow paint and red decals to the modern sedan. Chysler has even updated them to read ‘Pacer 392’, rather than the ‘Pacer 225’ written on the original.

This does also mean that the Pacer tribute makes use of a 6.4-liter (392-cubic inch) Hemi V-8 engine, offering 350 kW (470 horsepower) for serious performance.  

A more than valiant tribute

Chrysler Australia 300 SRT Pacer TributeAs impressive as the VF Valiant Pacer was when new, we imagine drivers of it would prefer the eight-speed automatic transmission with launch control, fitted to the Pacer tribute car. 

Sizeable 20-inch alloy wheels on the 300 SRT Pacer tribute dwarf those on the original Valiant. The SRT’s front splitter and rear spoiler give it an aggressive appearance. 

Chrysler has not yet confirmed how many examples of the 300 SRT Pacer will be built, or how much they will cost. However, for those wanting to relive the glory days of Australian performance, the price is likely to be worth paying.

You could own Frank Sinatra’s Chrysler ‘Woody’

Frank Sinatra Chrysler Woody Wagon up for sale H&H Classics

Frank Sinatra’s old 1985 Chrysler Le Baron Town & Country Turbo ‘Woody’ estate is up for sale. You could own this 20th-century pop culture legend’s last car, when it heads to auction on 2 February 2019.

Yes, the car is purported to be the last car the famed singer-songwriter and actor used, being driven around Las Vegas during the last ten years of his life in the Chrysler Wagon. The style of car was reported to be close to Sinatra’s heart, being an aesthetic that developed in the 1940s.

Frank Sinatra Chrysler Woody Wagon up for sale H&H Classics

There’s no doubting the car’s provenance, either. It is supplied with copies of the title complete with Sinatra’s signature, while also adorned with his full name. Sinatra’s Chauffeur ‘c/o Nathan Golden’ is also listed, along with his address – 70855 Sinatra Drive, Racho Mirage, CA 92270.

The car is set to lead what is to be H&H Classics’ first ‘live’ auction – that is, with bidding taking place over the internet. It’s a strong headline car, given the success of previous Sinatra-owned motorcars when they hit the block. Among them are an unremarkable 1989 Jaguar XJS, which by virtue of its provenance pulled £113,600 in 1998, and a 56 Ford Thunderbird that brought in £106,500.

Frank Sinatra Chrysler Woody Wagon up for sale H&H Classics

Sinatra was, of course, one of the great shining performing lights of his era, active between the mid-30s and the mid-90s. He was a headline figure in both the music and movie industries. But for a short retirement spell in the early 1970s, he worked tirelessly up until his death in 1998.

Sinatra is one of those names that everyone with even a passing interest in music knows because there are very few that don’t recognise at least one of Frank’s songs.

H&H Classics is accepting entries now for the February sale in which Sinatra’s old ‘Woody’ Chrysler is due to hit the block.

Frank Sinatra Chrysler Woody Wagon up for sale H&H Classics

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The biggest and most flamboyant American cars

The biggest and most flamboyant American cars

The biggest and most flamboyant American carsFrom the 1960s through to the early 1980s, giant beasts roamed the highways of America. Bedecked in chrome and vinyl, wearing whitewall tyres and powered by huge, lazy engines, these land yachts were the biggest of the big. We’ve unearthed 21 of these dinosaurs, and all of them stretch the tape measure to at least 214 inches (5.4 metres) in length. Let’s set sail.

1963 Dodge Custom 880 – 214.8 inches / 5.45 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Our first port of call is Dodge’s short-lived Custom 880. Although still a large vehicle by modern standards, the era of the land yachts was one where size really did matter. Under pressure to compete with Chevrolet, Dodge rushed out its own version of the Chrysler Newport. A 361-cubic inch (5.9-litre) V8 engine with 265hp was standard, with a 383ci (6.3-litre) 305hp V8 optional. It wasn’t enough, and the 880 was dead in the water by 1965.

1975 Dodge Charger SE – 216 inches / 5.48 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Most people immediately think ‘muscle car’ when the name Charger is mentioned. But by 1975, an icon of the horsepower wars was little more than a jaded luxury coupe. It may have had sumptuous 24-ounce shagpile carpeting inside, but the square exterior styling made it a nightmare for the NASCAR teams forced to use it on-track. Dodge only managed to sell 31,000 examples in 1975.

1970 Ford LTD – 216.1 inches / 5.49 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Between 1969 and 1978, Ford sold 7.75 million examples of the second-generation LTD and its Mercury sisters. It was also the biggest car offered by the Blue Oval during its lifetime. Styling for the 1970 model year included a grille inspired by the Thunderbird, combined with funky hidden headlights. Engine choices ranged from a big 302-cubic inch (4.9-litre) V8, through to a really big 429ci (7.0) V8.

1971 Buick Riviera – 217.4 inches / 5.52 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Big and bold was the look for the third-generation Buick Riviera, launched in 1971. A giant ‘boat tail’ rear end seems apt for a land yacht, but the radical styling proved unsuccessful with buyers. A ‘Full-Flo’ ventilation system, with a habit of sucking exhaust fumes and rain water into the cabin, probably didn’t endear the Rivera to customers either. More impressive was the standard-fit ‘MaxTrac’ traction control for the 455-cubic inch (7.5-litre) V8 engine.

1969 Dodge Polara – 220.8 inches / 5.61 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Now we’re getting into the realm of serious yachting as we sail across the 220-inch longitude. Adopting Dodge’s ‘fuselage’ styling concept, the 1969 Polara was available in five different body styles. Engine choices were all V8s, ranging from a modest 230hp 381-cubic inch (6.2-litre) to the thumping 440-ci (6.5-litre) Magnum with 375hp and 480lb ft of torque. The sales brochure boasted of hidden windshield wipers, and carpets so plush you’d want to take your shoes off to drive.

1959 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country Wagon – 220.9 inches / 5.61 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

It might be from an earlier decade than the others on our list, and it also happens to be an estate. But the ’59 Town & Country is still very much a land yacht. Standard-fit was the ‘Golden Lion’ 413-cubic inch (6.77-litre) V8 engine, with 350hp and a push-button three-speed automatic transmission. Optional extras included the ‘Mirrormatic’ electrically dimming rear-view mirror. Strange to think you often need to pay extra for an automatic dimming mirror on a new car almost six decades later.

1980 Plymouth Gran Fury – 221.5 inches / 5.62 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

For a significant period of its life, the Plymouth Gran Fury existed to satisfy the demands of the fleet market, and this lifeline kept it alive. It may have been downsized for 1980, but this is still a huge vehicle. Police chiefs loved them, with a special package offered to boost the 360-cubic inch (5.9-litre) V8 engine to a ‘massive’ 195hp. By 1980, the land yacht era had capsized, and Plymouth ditched the Gran Fury part-way through 1981.

1973 Chevrolet Impala Custom Coupe – 221.9 inches / 5.64 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Chevrolet’s marketing pitch for 1973 sounded more like a political campaign speech, rather than a way to sell cars. It was about ‘building a better way to see America’ and what could be better than seeing it from the vinyl and woodgrain interior of your Impala? Powering you across the country was a standard 145hp ‘Turbo Fire’ 350-cubic inch (5.7-litre) V8. But, if you really wanted to make progress, you could pick the optional 455-ci (7.5-litre) ‘Turbo Jet’ V8 with 245hp. That might have required several more stops for gas, though.

1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible – 224.1 inches / 5.69 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

This is decadence! In 1976 Cadillac was very keen to stress that the Eldorado was the last American convertible. Features such as automatic climate control and plush six-way adjustable leather seats pushed the Eldorado’s weight to 5,153lb (2,337kg). Thankfully, propulsion came from an extravagant 500-cubic inch (8.2-litre) V8, even if all that displacement could only generate 235hp. Owners might have been even more grateful for the standard ventilated disc brakes.

1976 Ford Thunderbird – 225.7 inches / 5.73 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Can you imagine how long polishing all the chrome on the Thunderbird’s front bumper would take? And that’s before you even get to the grille, the headlight surrounds, wing mirrors, and finally, the rear bumper. All that shine meant the Thunderbird weighed in at over 5,000lb (2,268kg). Power came courtesy of a 460-cubic inch (7.7-litre) V8, connected to a ‘Cruise-O-Matic’ transmission. An eight-track tape player was a $382 option, whilst the distinctive ‘Lipstick’ colour scheme added $546 to the $7,790 list price.

1977 Dodge Royal Monaco – 225.7 inches / 5.73 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

If you were the kind of person who liked traditional value, combined with an added touch of luxury, then the Royal Monaco was for you. Slide around on the standard vinyl-upholstered seats, revel at the choice of two ashtrays in both the front and rear passenger compartments, and impress people with your hidden headlights. If you’re really feeling flush, perhaps you might go for the option of a locking gas cap, or the unmitigated luxury of an electric digital clock.

1978 Ford Country Squire – 225.7 inches / 5.73 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Nothing says ‘premium’ like slapping simulated woodgrain to the side of a station wagon. From 1951 to 1991, Ford’s full-size estate featured imitation timber trim. The 1978 Country Squire would be a final flourish for outlandish size, as the following year saw a smaller seventh-generation car. But in 1978, tipping the scales at some 4,881lb (2,214kg) meant even the largest engine option of the 460-cubic inch (7.5-litre) V8 could only push the Squire to a maximum speed of 111mph. Still, at least you wouldn’t have to worry about varnishing that wood.

1970 Buick Electra 225 – 225.8 inches / 5.74 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

It becomes evident how important size was in the land yacht era, when manufacturers were willing to incorporate length into a model name. Between 1959 and 1969, the length of the Electra had fluctuated, but for 1970 it returned to that eponymous measurement. Also new for 1970 was a 455-cubic inch (7.5-litre) V8 with an impressive 370hp and 510lb ft. It may have been vast, but the Electra 225 was certainly no slouch, making it one of the raciest yachts on our list.

1972 Lincoln Continental Mark IV – 228.1 inches / 5.79 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Aside from the Ford Thunderbird, the Lincoln Continental range of the 1970s is perhaps the best example of the personal luxury coupe genre. For those customers wanting to go completely overboard, Lincoln offered a range of designer special editions. Created by Bill Blass, Gucci, Givenchy, and Cartier, each car came with a bespoke colour scheme, plus a gold-plated plaque on the dashboard. The latter could even be engraved with the owner’s name, just in case you forgot who you were.

1970 Imperial Crown – 229.7 inches / 5.83 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Chrysler had used the Imperial name since the 1920s, but between 1955 and 1975 it created a standalone marque to rival Cadillac and Lincoln. Life was tough for the third-generation range of Imperials, as being based on Chrysler platforms and bodyshells placed them at a disadvantage versus other luxury brands. Instead, the Imperial had to compete on features like a standard 440-cubic inch (7.2-litre) V8 engine with 350hp, or bench seating described as being like a sumptuous sofa – finished in cloth and vinyl.

1975 Cadillac Coupe de Ville – 230.7 inches / 5.86 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Across the 230-inch threshold we sail, and into what we can probably title as the ‘super yacht’ category. These next six cars are truly vast, and the de Ville is a perfect expression of the self-indulgence available. Interiors were offered in both leather or patterned velour, while the exterior featured a huge vinyl roof and cornering lights to help steer your ship. Airbags for the driver and passenger were an option, as was traction control and, of course, whitewall striped tyres.

1978 Chrysler New Yorker Brougham – 231 inches / 5.88 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

By the late 1970s, land yachts like the New Yorker were bigger than disco music. But 1978 would be the final year of the Chrysler ‘C-body’ platform that saw service in many of the full-size machines on our list. A 400-cubic inch (6.6-litre) V8 came as standard, unless you happened to live in California or high-altitude states ,where the smaller and cleaner 360-ci (5.9-litre) V8 was mandatory. On the options list was a AM/FM stereo with a search function operated by a foot switch, and even a CB radio.

1974 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight LS – 232.4 inches / 5.90 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Another giant of the Chrysler ‘C-body’ era was the Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight. Before the marque was made to walk the plank in 2004, Oldsmobile was the oldest surviving American car brand. The glory days came in the 1970s, and with cars like the colossal 1974 Ninety-Eight it’s not hard to see why. Plus, any car with a 455-cubic inch (7.5-litre) V8 engine named ‘Rocket’ gains serious credibility. The record length for ’74 models came from the need to incorporate federally mandated 5mph bumpers into the already vast design.

1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V – 233 inches / 5.92 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

If you thought the Mark IV Continental was whale-sized, then we’re going to need a bigger boat for the Mark V. With almost a further five inches in length, the Mark V was even more opulent and ostentatious. A vinyl roof was standard for 1979, as were the round ‘opera’ windows, and a Cartier-logoed clock. For true glitz, buyers could opt for The Collector Series, which was promoted by Tom Selleck. Gold-toned grille inserts, a crystal-like hood ornament, and acres of padded vinyl proved you were ready to celebrate the final year before downsizing would claim another victim.

1975 Buick Electra 225 – 233.7 inches / 5.96 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

Having strayed a long way from the original 225 inches, by 1975 the Electra was now one of the biggest monsters roaming the turnpike. According to Buick, the 225 was for those who wanted to drive a luxury car without being pretentious. Although the promotional photo, taken outside a sprawling mansion, somewhat begs to differ, while interior options included plush patterned velour upholstery. Sadly, the steadfast 455-ci (7.5-litre) engine was now smothered by emissions and fuel-saving changes, producing just 205hp.

1973 Imperial LeBaron – 235.3 inches / 5.98 metresThe biggest and most flamboyant American cars

This is it, the end of our epic voyage. It means we’ve come to the biggest land yacht, and one of the longest post-war American production cars, period. Federally mandated bumpers were responsible for making the LeBaron even lengthier in 1973, adding an extra 5.8-inches to its already imposing dimensions. After 1973, the Imperial brand would slip away, finally being cast adrift for good in 1975. Oil embargos and emissions regulations would be the factors that sunk the Imperial, and would do the same for the rest of the land yacht fleet by the early 1980s.

Chrysler Voyager heritage

Great Motoring Disasters: Chrysler

Chrysler Voyager heritage

As the future of Chrysler is revealed in Italy, we look back to our 2015 piece on its last big retrenchment from the UK market…

So, Chrysler is withdrawing from the UK. Not that there’s a lot of withdrawing to be done, the American brand’s armoury having already shrivelled to three models following the Delta’s unnoticed deletion.

That leaves the little Ypsilon supermini, the Grand Voyager and the 300C, which not so long ago was the car that galvanised Chrysler’s UK appeal, many considering its handsome, square-edged look worthy of a ‘mini-Bentley’ epithet. Some even fitted glittery radiator grilles to heighten the illusion.

But the heavily facelifted 300C has failed to rekindle the appeal of the original, leaving its ageing mechanicals exposed to acid comparison. And while plenty of Voyagers, Grand or otherwise, have found berths outside British homes over the years, including one Tony Blair’s, the appeal of the big MPV has long since faded, not least against products of the kind sold by Chrysler’s sister brand Jeep.

Chrysler Fiat

And the Ypsilon? This imaginatively styled hatch pioneered the premium supermini over three decades ago with the flat-tailed Lancia Y10, but there are plenty of other tailgated babies that do plush a lot more effectively than this rough-riding Fiat Panda reskin.

Its prospects over here were not helped by the fact that neither it nor the Delta were Chryslers at all, both being rebadged Lancias launched here well after their less-than-rapturous Italian debuts. Cynical rebrandings don’t often work in car world, and that’s why you rarely see them today.

That said, the market-positioning ambitions of both Chrysler and Lancia do vaguely coincide in that both aim to play the premium game. Until Lancia disappeared from Britain in the early ‘90s that’s where it just about sat, while Chrysler has been attempting to reclaim the moderately upscale territory it occupied 60 years ago.

Which will not be the work of a moment in its homeland, and has no resonance in Europe because the brand was barely here back then. Instead, what Chrysler has been most consistent about during its half century or so of troubled European manoeuvres has been the annexing, hijacking, repurposing and general buggering about with other company’s hardware, of which the lazily relabelled Delta and Ypsilon are only the latest example.

Chrysler: classic badge engineering

If you’re old enough, you may remember the now-abandoned Chrysler pentastar adorning the front wings of machines as disparate as the Hillman Imp, Humber Sceptre, Sunbeam-Lotus and various long-forgotten vans. And if you’re French and of similar age you’ll recall that same badge appearing on the front wings of Simcas, a long extinct brand that in the early ‘70s made the best-selling car in Europe in the slightly ungainly shape of the Simca 1100, a car that successfully did the Golf’s job seven years before the VW arrived.

Chrysler Horizon

The reason for the pentastar’s occupation of front wing real estate was that Chrysler bought into and eventually owned the British Rootes Group that made Hillmans, Singers, Sunbeams and Humbers, and did the same with France’s Simca. Ambitions to emulate Ford of Europe and GM’s success with Vauxhall and Opel was its mission. Eventually it rebranded the Simcas and Rootes model as Chryslers, the French cars gradually supplanting the British ones because they were better.

That much better, in fact, that the Simca 1307/1308 won the Car of the Year award in 1976, this now-forgotten model known to us as the Chrysler Alpine. That victory was followed by another for 1978, with the Simca/Chrysler Horizon that replaced the Simca 1100.

A version of the Horizon was also sold in the US (and as the Dodge Omni, too) these ranges scoring an impressive three million sales in 10 years on both sides of the Atlantic. Less impressive was the fact that though ostensibly identical, the European and American Horizons shared no more than about two parts, Chrysler completely failing to capitalise on the cost-savings that such scale-economies ought to have generated.

‘Amateur corporate bungling’

It was the kind of amateur corporate bungling that would get Chrysler into plenty more trouble in the decades to come. But it did manage to offload its ramshackle European operations on Peugeot in 1978, which bought them for reasons that it was hard to fathom, despite the acquisition costing a nominal dollar. All Chryslers were renamed Talbots, and within a decade Peugeot had steered Talbot to its death.

But the Chrysler name returned to the UK in the 1990s, this time on 100 percent American cars, a UK importer shrewdly reckoning that it could usefully add a few choice Chryslers to supplement its Jeep line-up. These were selected from a range revitalised after another of this long-lived US brand’s near-death moments.

Chrysler Neon

The Voyager MPV wasn’t a bad alternative to a Ford Galaxy or Renault Espace, and despite being a saloon in a hatch-dominated market, America’s much-trumpeted Neon was engineered for right hand drive and shipped our way too. The trumpetings were mainly about the fact that Chrysler had finally managed to spit out an all-new car, and at a temptingly low price, the Neon making a certain low-rent sense in the US. Its super-low sticker price, surprisingly potent motor and cheeky face were some sort of compensation for the cacophonously chafing cabin plastics and the grim noises emerging from beyond the front bulkhead.

But travel to the UK inflated the Neon’s price towards the preposterous, the British importers cleverly (or cruelly…) speccing the car up with automatic transmission, plastic-look leather and moulded walnut that snagged a surprising number of geriatrics who thought they were getting a rattling good deal.

Dodge Viper

And excitement was added to the range via the familiar rebadging tactic, the victim this time the spectacular AC Cobra reinterpretation that was the V10 Dodge Viper. Not many were sold – it was a bit unsubtle for Britain, its roof possessed with the weatherproofing qualities of a broken window – but it certainly added excitement.

DaimlerChrysler calamity

Chrysler 300C Mk1

And then in 1998 Daimler bought Chrysler, a calamity for most concerned, although this unlikely liaison did yield a few interesting offspring, among the best of them the Chrysler 300C. This was a big car that should have bombed in Britain’s premium-obsessed executive market, but such was the brilliance of its confident, square-shouldered styling that it became gotta-have-it wheels for those of lightly blingish persuasion.

Chrysler PT Cruiser

Less convincing was the PT Cruiser, an American hot-rod-alike-turned mini-MPV that actually sold pretty here despite the minimal relevance of its hot-rod referencing and a cabin that did not reward close inspection.

It was followed by the Crossfire coupe, whose Mercedes SLK innards dulled an interesting design to numbing effect, and the Sebring, a style-free zone that had none of the 300C’s design panache, and when propelled by an obsolete VW diesel was as miserable as life with a pneumatic drill. There was an even more dismal Dodge version, but that’s another sorry story.

Did I mention the Sebring convertible? Chrysler UK didn’t, its publicists concluding that the best way to off-load these machines was to avoid subjecting its numerous shortfalls to the scrutiny of the press.

Squandered momentum; enter Fiat

The momentum gathered by the 300C’s success was about to be squandered during the ructions of Daimler’s departure from its self-made North American mess, Chrysler’s acquisition by clueless money-shufflers Cerberus, the 2008 recession and the company’s lifesaving takeover by Fiat. On the other side of the Atlantic that critic-defying, life-saving manoeuvre by Fiat boss Sergio Marchionne has ended up saving Fiat itself, Chrysler and Jeep in particular enjoying prosperous new times at home.

But Marchionne’s often cavalier approach to product development is how Chrysler’s UK range has ended up half-filled with ageing Lancias, this terminally wounded, once famous brand retreating to Italy with a Chrysler in its line-up called Voyager. There was a Thema-badged 300C in the range too, but that has already died.

Chrysler 200

Though Chrysler isn’t doing badly in the US with its all-new 200 (pictured above), Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has concluded that rebadging Chryslers as Lancias isn’t going to work in Europe, making the case for selling right-hand drive Chryslers here a slender one at best.

Instead the future is Jeep-shaped, and Chrysler will once again die a UK death. Given the brand’s pinball trajectory over the decades, I wouldn’t bet against it returning again one day.

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid

Google Car self-driving tech to be tested in Chrysler Pacifica MPV

Chrysler Pacifica HybridGoogle Self-Driving Car technology is to be tested in a Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid MPV – the first time Google’s worked directly with a car maker to integrate its autonomous car tech into a production passenger vehicle.

The deal is a major coup for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) which will work with Google to fully integrate all the self-driving sensors and software into the 2017 Chrysler: testing will begin later in 2016.

It’s no one-off build either: FVA will build 100 self-driving Chryslers carrying Google self-driving tech, in a co-location facility in Michigan.

They’ll first be tested on a California racetrack before being rolled out onto public roads.

Previously, it was rumoured Ford would be collaborating with Google to co-develop self-driving cars: an announcement was expected at CES 2016 back in January, but it didn’t occur. Now, it seems FCA has picked up the baton.

“FCA has a nimble and experienced engineering team and the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan is well-suited for Google’s self-driving technology,” said John Krafcik, CEO of the Google Self-Driving Car Project.

“The opportunity to work closely with FCA engineers will accelerate our efforts to develop a fully self-driving car that will make our roads safer and bring everyday destinations within reach for those who cannot drive.”

“Working with Google provides an opportunity for FCA to partner with one of the world’s leading technology companies to accelerate the pace of innovation in the automotive industry,” said Sergio Marchionne, CEO of FCA.

“The experience both companies gain will be fundamental to delivering automotive technology solutions that ultimately have far-reaching consumer benefits.”

Chrysler 300C

Fiat to kill off Chrysler in the UK?

Chrysler 300CItalian carmaker Fiat could kill off its group-owned sister company Chrysler in the UK, according to new rumours.  Read more

fiat_chrysler_fca_logo

Fiat: no longer Italian (but FCA is coming to the UK)

fiat_chrysler_fca_logoA new car company has today been created: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, or FCA, which will be Dutch-registered, UK-based and listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Read more

Chrysler sends 93 Vipers to crusher

viper2Chrysler has defended itself against criticism from enthusiasts after it ordered 93 classic  Dodge Vipers to be crushed.

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Chrysler 300C

£10,000 off Chrysler 300C creates £399 PCP bargain

Chrysler 300CIn an apparent admission of new car launch optimism, Chrysler has cut £10,000 from the list price of the 300C – taking it down to £29,995 on the road.

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Dodge range slashed to 1 model

Dodge has dramatically cut back on the range of cars it sells in the UK due to slow sales.

The Chrysler sub-brand has been slashed to just one car in the UK – the Journey 7-seat people carrier.

The Ford Focus rivaling Caliber has been ditched, along with the Nitro 7-seat 4×4. Dodge dealers will concentrate on that Journey, which is a Ford S-Max alternative at a sharp price.

Last year, Dodge also killed the Avenger family saloon in the UK. Luckily for the brand’s dealers, being part of the Chrysler family means they also have Chrysler and Jeeps to sell.

This could mark the first of more significant changes now Fiat Auto has taken stewardship of Chrysler. Its brands have struggled in recent years and Fiat is intent on improving performance with a new range of models. RA

>>For more information on the various ranges – including details of the outgoing Dodges! – check out the Motoring Research dataset.

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