Roborace RobocarThe Roborace driverless car race series has appointed Hollywood sci-fi designer Daniel Simon as its chief design officer – and the German futurist has revealed his first sketches of the ambitious self-driving racer that will be hitting the world’s circuits later in 2016.

Called Robocar, the concept is, of course, unlike no other racing car in the world. Not least because it doesn’t need to house a driver.

With concealed wheels, aero-tuned surfacing and an almost scarily far-out appearance, the mean-looking racing car concept is guaranteed to stand out – particularly if Simon’s able to bring something like this to the FIA Formula E support series from autumn 2016.

The fact it doesn’t have to accommodate a driver is something Simon’s taken full advantage of, he explained.

“My goal was to create a vehicle that takes full advantage of the unusual opportunities of having no driver without ever compromising on beauty. Racing engineers and aerodynamicists have worked with me from the beginning to strike that balance.

“The Roborace is as much about competition as it is entertainment. Therefore – and quite unusual in today’s racing world – beauty was very high on our agenda and we work hard to merge the best performance with stunning styling.”

Explaining the tech details behind his concept, Simon said: “It was important to us that we generate substantial downforce without unnecessary parts cluttering the car to maintain a clean and iconic look.

“This is largely made possible by using the floor as the main aerodynamic device and we are currently developing active body parts that are more organic and seamless than solutions today.”

What is Roborace?

The Roborace driverless race series will support the FIA Formula E championship from the 2016/17 season. The electric-powered cars will be controlled by real-time computing algorithms and Artificial Intelligence, in full racing conditions.

10 teams will each run two cars, and the races will be an hour long.

All cars will be identical and the robotic autonomous racers will compete against one another across a full year-long season to decide the first driverless car world champion.