What classic cars cost then – and what they cost nowYour first encounter with a car was probably when your parents drove you home from the maternity ward. Safe to say you won’t remember much about the journey, but did your folks ever reveal their choice of wheels for this momentous drive? And would would that car cost in today’s money? We’ve crunched the numbers to find out. 

1950: Ford AngliaWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1950 price: £310

Price adjusted: £9,888

According to a copy of Motor, October 1948, the Ford Anglia was the cheapest four-wheel car in Britain. In 1950, the Anglia – a descendant of the current Ford Focus – would have set you back £310, the equivalent of £9,888 in today’s money.

1959: MiniWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1959 price: £497 – £537

Price adjusted: £10,502 – £11,348

Although synonymous with the Swinging Sixties, the Mini burst onto the scene in 1959, with prices ranging from £497 to £537. It quite literally changed the shape of British motoring and laid the foundations for a new decade.

1964: Lotus CortinaWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1964 price: £1,100

2016 price adjusted: £20,799

Back in 1964, you could drive away in this super-saloon for £1,100 – about a third of the average house price. Inflation adjusted, that’s a little over £20,000. Good luck securing a roadworthy Mk1 Lotus Cortina for that price in 2016.

1966: Porsche 911What classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1966 price: £3,438

2016 price adjusted: £60,042

In 1966, as England lifted the still-gleaming Jules Rimet trophy, the Porsche 911 was in its infancy. You could have celebrated the Three Lions’ triumph by purchasing a 911 for £3,438 (£60,042 in 2016). Today, you’ll need at least £76,412.

1969: Ford CapriWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1969 price: £890

2016 price adjusted: £13,939

As if to bridge the gap between the 60s and 70s, Ford launched the Capri in 1969. The ‘car you always promised yourself’ became a firm favourite of the 1970s, not least because of its low price. Just £890 for the ‘European Mustang’ – what a steal.

1975: BMW 2002 TiiWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1975 price: £3,659

2016 price adjusted: £34,431

The rather brilliant BMW 2002 Tii cost an eye-watering £3,659 in 1975 – the equivalent of £34,431 in 2016. That’s more than the price of a new BMW M140i.

1982: Fiat Panda34_Cost_Car_Year_Born

1982 price: £2,995

2016 price adjusted: £10,372

Fiat celebrated the Panda’s first birthday by slashing its price to £2,995. “Fiat [has] discovered a way of making Pandas breed like rabbits.” Well, quite. The equivalent price today: £10,372. That’s cheaper than a 2016 Fiat Panda…

1988: Rover 800 VitesseWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1988 price: £19,944

2016 price adjusted: £50,656

Oh, Rover, where did it all go wrong? Actually, that’s a rhetorical question, because its demise has been well documented. In 1988, the not-so-small matter of £19,944 could get you behind the wheel of the fastest road-going Rover: the 800 Vitesse.

1992: Jaguar XJS 4.0 ConvertibleWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1992 price: £39,900

2016 price adjusted: £77,284

Check out the price of a Jaguar XJS 4.0 Convertible in 1992. At just shy of £40,000, it was about two-thirds of the average house price. Expensive? At £77,284 in today’s money, that’s more than a Jaguar F-Type S AWD.

1997: Porsche BoxsterWhat classic cars cost then – and what they cost now

1997 price: £33,950

2016 price adjusted: £57,510

Check out the launch price of the Porsche Boxster. At £33,950 it sounds good value, but inflation adjusted that results in a figure of £57,510. That’s not cheap, especially when you consider the average house price in 1997 was £76,103. We should also point out that an entry-level 718 Boxster could be yours for a mere £41,739.