Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Find a famous name listed as the previous owner on your car’s V5C registration certificate and you could be in for a nice little earner. That’s the message following research conducted by Auto Trader, which reveals how having a famous owner can increase the price of a car by up to 241 percent.

Ryan Giggs’s Bentley Continental GT: 4%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Here’s the Bentley Continental GT Mulliner previously owned by current Wales manager and former Man Utd wing wizard, Ryan Giggs. According to Auto Trader, a similar spec car would be listed on the classifieds site for £34,950, but the Bentley with Giggs’s name on the logbook was worth an extra £1,450. Hardly the 241 percent bonus promised in the headline, but things do get better.

Jamie Vardy’s Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG: 7%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Wait, what’s this, another red herring? Jamie Vardy’s old Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG was listed for sale on Auto Trader in 2016. The price: £38,500. At the time, similar cars were priced at £35,000 to £36,000. Today, some sellers are offering 2013 C63s for as much as £40k, which suggests Vardy’s old motor wasn’t a huge money-spinner, even with a limited edition packet of ready salted Walkers crisps in the glovebox.

Wayne Rooney’s BMW i8: 8%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

The former England captain was forced to sell his BMW i8 after being banned from driving for two years after being caught at nearly three times the legal alcohol limit. The hybrid supercar – which would have cost around £112,000 when new – was listed on Auto Trader for £64,995. We found similar i8s online for around £60,000, which suggests a modest 8% premium. That said, there are other, more expensive i8s for sale, all from the same year, but without the Rooney connection.

Cristiano Ronaldo’s Bentley Continental GT Speed: 81%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

The Portuguese ace owned this Bentley Continental GT Speed when he played in England, and it was listed for sale on Auto Trader in 2016. Back then, you would have paid £65,000 for the privilege of owning a car owned by the five-time Ballon d’Or winner. Only you didn’t have to, because the car went under the hammer at the NEC Classic Motor Show in November 2016, where it sold for just £51,188. Today, similar cars cost around £36,000, but you need to factor in the cost of depreciation when considering a celebrity premium.

Jay Kay’s Lamborghini Diablo: 96%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

This is the actual Lamborghini Diablo driven by Jay Kay in the video for the Jamiroquai song Cosmic Girl. It arrived on the market last summer, with cosmic price tag of £549,995, but remains on sale, with the price reduced to £499,995. It’s an SE30, a limited-run special edition to mark the company’s 30th anniversary. Finding other SE30s is tough – only 150 were built – although, randomly, Auto Trader is comparing the price to Murcielago values. This is also a good opportunity to point out that a car is only worth what somebody is prepared to pay for it – a list price is not necessarily representative of value.

The Queen’s Bentley Mulsanne: 122%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Sure, the Bentley Mulsanne may have been listed for sale at £200,000, but it didn’t sell. Then, when it was auctioned at the Goodwood Revival in September 2017, it failed to reach its reserve. And why should it, when perfectly adequate examples of a similar vintage are available for £90,000? The celebrity link is not all it’s cracked up to be and it’s certainly no guarantee that the car will have been looked after. However, we do accept that Her Majesty is unlikely to have taken her Mulsanne to the Windsor retail car park to do a few doughnuts.

David Beckham’s BMW 645Ci: 130%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

David Beckham’s 2005 BMW 645Ci was listed for sale in 2014 for the eye-watering price of £75,000. We rather like this comment left on the Evening Standard website, when the story was covered four years ago: “£75,000 for a 9 year old 645? I don’t care who owned it, it wasn’t the best version of the original 6, it’s got a loose service history, and, given the stupid wheels it’s been saddled with (with seemingly no other setup changes) I’d have the suspension very closely checked out. Otherwise, a nice car. There’s bound to be a fame obsessed sucker out there.” Beckham’s old BMW was last on the road in 2016.

Prince William’s Range Rover SE Vogue: 226%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

Excuse us while we fire up the cynicism-o-meter again. Yes, Prince William’s Range Rover SE Vogue was listed on Auto Trader for £150,000 – which is more than three times the typical £46,000 selling price – but it actually sold for £80,000 in a charity auction. A decent premium, but we question whether it would have sold for as much without the charidee connection.

Katie Price’s Range Rover Vogue SE: 241%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

In 2013, Katie Price tweeted “Sad sale of my pink car, the spec I chose myself, lots of bling!! Serious callers only.” This followed an earlier attempt to sell the very pink Range Rover via Twitter for £100,000, before turning to Auto Trader for help, this time at the reduced asking price of £70,000. Today, similar 2011 Vogue SE models are available for around £20,500, but we’ll add one huge caveat to this: depreciation.

Michael Winner’s Rolls-Royce Corniche III: -47%

Celebrity cars sell for up to 241% more

A Rolls-Royce Corniche III, owned by the late film director Michael Winner, which he famously purchased to celebrate accumulating £6 million worth of debt, was listed for £69,950 in 2013. According to Auto Trader, a similar car (pictured) is on sale for £132,950, which, it says, represents a loss and proves that the celeb angle isn’t a guarantee of a nice little earner. Yes, but five years is a lifetime in the classic car world, so we’re not surprised that the car would be worth more.

The way we see it, the ‘celebrity’ angle is a grey area. If the car was owned by a racing legend, Hollywood film star or appeared in a movie, then fine. But asking a premium because a current footballer once drove the car… we’re not convinced.

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