Missed the boat? The classic cars you should have invested in

Missed the boat? The classic cars you should have invested in

Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Figures released by Classic Trader, in association with Classic Management, reveal the classic cars which have recorded the biggest shifts in value over the last six years. In each case, we’ll present the car’s value in 2010, along with the value of the same car in 2015. The figures are presented in reverse order.

1972 Dino 246 GTS: 171% growth

Value in 2010: €124,758 (£98,460)
Value in 2015: €338,106 (£266,835)

The figures provided by Classic Trader are in euros, so we’ve converted them to British pounds. In 2010, it was possible to buy a Dino 246 GTS for less than £100,000. According to the Classic Management data, you’ll need to part with a cool quarter of a million in 2016.

2005 Saleen S7 Twin Turbo: 177% growth

2005 Saleen S7 Twin Turbo: 177% growth

Value in 2010: €219,572 (£173,287)
Value in 2015: €610,390 (£481,723)

Whether you see classic cars as potential investments or simply something to enjoy, Classic Trader warns there’s a financial risk involved. The online marketplace for classics recommends choosing a 30- to 40-year-old car, ideally accident-free and in top condition. A 2005 Saleen doesn’t exact fit the age criteria, but the percentage growth in value shouldn’t be sneezed at.

1958 Jaguar XK150 Fixed Head Coupe: 180% growth

Value in 2010: €28,192 (£22,249)
Value in 2015: €79,043 (£62,381)

A new Jaguar F-Type S Coupe will set you back just over £60,000, but for a similar price you could own a Jaguar XK150 Fixed Head Coupe. And unlike the F-Type, the classic Jag is finished with depreciation, with prices seemingly on the up. With a 180% growth in prices, this is certainly more fun than a pension.

1960 Aston Martin DB4 S1: 184% growth

1960 Aston Martin DB4 S1: 184% growth

Value in 2010: €239,113 (£188,709)
Value in 2015: €679,456 (£536,230)

Aston Martin started work on the DB4 back in 1956, ahead of its launch at the 1958 London Motor Show. The DB4 was the first production car capable of 0-100-0mph in under 30 seconds. If you bought a DB4 in 2010, the value could have risen by around £350,000.

1968 Bentley T1 Coupe Speciale by Pininfarina: 186% growth

Value in 2010: €120,679 (£95,240)
Value in 2015: €345,511 (£272,679)

Don’t be too hard on yourself if you missed the boat on this one, Bentley produced just the one model. The road-going T1 Coupe Speciale was a prototype originally owned by Lord Hanson and sold for £117,103 at a Bonhams sale. The same car sold at the Bonhams Goodwood Members’ Meeting in 2015 for £250,140 including premium.

1933 Marmon Sixteen Victoria Coupe: 206% growth

1933 Marmon Sixteen Victoria Coupe: 206% growth

Value in 2010: €265,284 (£209,364)
Value in 2015: €812,213 (£614,003)

In 2015, this 1933 Marmon Sixteen Victoria Coupe sold at the RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale for a cool $905,500. A few years earlier, the car formerly owned by Bernie Ecclestone could have been yours for roughly a third of the price. According to RM Sotheby’s there are just three left in the world.

1973 Lamborghini Espada S3: 219% growth

Value in 2010: €29,277 (£23,105)
Value in 2015: €93,629 (£73,893)

Goodness, was the Lamborghini Espada really worth so little in 2010? The Classic Trader data lists the Espada S3 at £73,893, but a quick trawl through the classifieds suggests prices may have risen even further. You’ll need well over six figures to secure this particular four-seat Lamborghini.

1969 Fiat 850 Spider: 219% growth

1969 Fiat 850 Spider: 219% growth

Value in 2010: €4,700 (£3,709)
Value in 2015: €15,000 (£11,838)

Fiat’s pretty little 850 Spider is one of the ‘cheaper’ cars listed by Classic Trader, but the percentage growth is anything but small. Yours for less than £4,000 in 2010, but you’ll need around £12,000 today.

1973 Porsche 911 2.7 Carrera RS Touring: 233% growth

Value in 2010: €163,127 (£128,741)
Value in 2015: €544,591 (£429,794)

The Porsche 911 2.7 Carrera RS Touring is often used as a prime example of the recent growth in classic car values, as ably demonstrated by the Classic Trader data. If you sold a 2.7 Carrera RS Touring in 2010, you might want to pour yourself a stiff drink.

1959 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster: 234% growth

1959 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster: 234% growth

Value in 2010: €491,253 (£387,700)
Value in 2015: €1,641,668 (£1,295,614)

Like the aforementioned Porsche, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster is another example of a car that sits well beyond the means of the average car collector. If you bought one in 2010, help yourself to a cool £1 million profit.

1964 Aston Martin DB5: 240% growth

Value in 2010: €222,712 (£175,766)
Value in 2015: €758,503 (£598,615)

We promise not to mention James Bond when describing the iconic Aston Martin DB5. Wait, what?

1965 Maserati Mistral 3.7 coupe: 242% growth

1965 Maserati Mistral 3.7 coupe: 242% growth

Value in 2010: €52,900 (£41,749)
Value in 2015: €181,184 (£142,991)

The Maserati Mistral was available with three different engines, but the Classic Trader data is based on the 3.7-litre coupe. It’s not the best looking Maserati ever made, but the £100,000 increase in value would be rather nice.

1972 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spider: 245% growth

Value in 2010: €711,822 (£561,774)
Value in 2015: €2,641,250 (£2,084,490)

A gilt-edged classic car, if ever there was one. Ferrari only built 121 true Daytona Spiders, so exclusivity is guaranteed. There’s just the small matter of £2 million to discuss…

2001 Ferrari 550 Barchetta Pininfarina: 271% growth

2001 Ferrari 550 Barchetta Pininfarina: 271% growth

Value in 2010: €111,252 (£87,801)
Value in 2015: €413,490 (£326,329)

The 550 Barchetta Pininfarina was so named to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Ferrari’s coachbuilder and stylist. A mere 448 cars were built, with the last one rolling off the production line in 2001. The percentage increase in value is proof that strong investment potential isn’t reserved for classics.

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Pininfarina: 323% growth

Value in 2010: €146,421 (£115,556)
Value in 2015: €620,235 (£489,493)

That said, this percentage increase demonstrates that there’s nothing quite like a classic Ferrari.

1949 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport Coupe: 326% growth

1949 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport Coupe: 326% growth

Value in 2010: €334,125 (£263,693)
Value in 2015: €1,425,435 (£1,124,961)

In 2015, this stunning 1948 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport Coupe sold at the Bonhams Quail Lodge sale for £1,011,035 including premium. Its racing pedigree is in no doubt, because this was essentially a Grand Prix racer for the road.

1953 Ferrari 212 Inter Europa by Vignale: 329% growth

Value in 2010: €341,000 (£269,119)
Value in 2015: €1,465,913 (£1,156,907)

The Ferrari 212 was launched in 1950 and available in Inter and Export model configuration. The Inter was the road-going version, with a number of limited edition models produced by specialist coachbuilders. The Vignale is the most eye-catching and one of the most sought-after. The 212 Europa Coupe seen here was sold at the RM Sotheby’s Amelia Island sale for $1,550,000.

1962 Aston Martin DB4 Vantage convertible: 329% growth

1962 Aston Martin DB4 Vantage convertible: 329% growth

Value in 2010: €484,518 (£382,384)
Value in 2015: €2,081,350 (£1,642,613)

Breaking up a series of Ferraris is this Aston Martin. The percentage increase is a staggering 329%, with a 1962 car worth well over £1.6 million.

1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast: 354% growth

Value in 2010: €595,946 (£470,324)
Value in 2015: €2,707,375 (£2,136,676)

You want evidence of rapid growth? In 2013, this 1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast sold at the Bonhams Goodwood Festival of Speed sale for £852,700. More recently, we’ve seen similar cars selling for £2 million, even £3 million. Once a car hits an upward curve, there’s seemingly no stopping it.

1977 Ferrari 512 BB: 391% growth

1977 Ferrari 512 BB: 391% growth

Value in 2010: €88,330 (£69,711)
Value in 2015: €434,264 (£342,724)

We’re firmly into the realms of stratospheric growth, as demonstrated by the 391% rise in values of the Ferrari 512 BB. Just imagine if you turned down the chance to buy one for £70,000 in 2010…

1962 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Roadster: 412% growth

Value in 2010: €41,881 (£33,054)
Value in 2015: €214,637 (£169,393)

While the 190SL languishes way behind the 300SL in terms of value, it’s outstripping its more illustrious sibling in terms of growth. We’re just disappointed we didn’t buy one for £33,054 in 2010…

1981 BMW M1: 448% growth

1981 BMW M1: 448% growth

Value in 2010: €103,699 (£81,840)
Value in 2015: €569,009 (£449,065)

We’re not surprised to see the BMW M1 on the march. Performance cars of the 1980s are hot property and they don’t come much hotter than BMW’s original supercar. Will values hit half a million in 2016?

1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 MkII Coupe: 469% growth

Value in 2010: €61,885 (£48,840)
Value in 2015: €352,265 (£278,010)

Into the top three, kicking off with the Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk11 Coupe. It was based on the DB2, but featured a wraparound windscreen, larger bumpers and repositioned headlights. This one sold at the 2014 Bonhams Bond Street sale for £163,900. It has probably gained a further £100,000 since then.

1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Drophead Sedanca Coupe: 498% growth

1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Drophead Sedanca Coupe: 498% growth

Value in 2010: €246,724 (£194,716)
Value in 2015: €1,476,750 (£1,165,460)

In 2014, this actual car sold at the RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale for $357,500, but it’s likely to be worth significantly more in 2016. Would you cash in or hope the value might continue to rise even further?

1970 De Tomaso Mangusta: 502% growth

Value in 2010: €48,236 (£38,068)
Value in 2015: €290,428 (£229,207)

And so to the star performer: the stunning De Tomaso Mangusta. Given its pedigree, performance and styling, it’s high time values caught up with those of more illustrious Italian thoroughbreds. A 502% growth beats any savings account we can name.

Remember, all figures are provided by Classic Trader, in conjunction with Classic Management.

Has an unhealthy obsession with cars of the 80s and 90s. Doesn’t really do supercars. Not a huge fan of sports cars. But loves the undervalued and the underwhelming.

Is probably a bit strange.

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