Brits buy car parts every second on eBay

As internet auction site ebay.co.uk celebrates its 18th anniversary, a report has revealed that motorists buy new car parts on the website every second.

Many car owners are tempted by low-cost parts on eBay, as well as the wide selection available. By comparison, a video game is sold every eight seconds, while a pair of women’s shoes is bought every five seconds.

The internet marketplace says it receives 4,397 searches for new exhaust systems every hour, while it’s noticed a surge in the sales of dashcams and hands-free kits. Unsurprisingly, exterior lighting parts peak in December, while windscreen wipers are popular ahead of April showers.

“With new driverless concept cars being presented this year by brands like Audi and Toyota, today’s trend may be foreshadowing a future in which people treat their cars as a ‘third space’, similar to coffee shops, in which they can work, relax and socialise in comfort during their automatic transportation,” said Murray Lambell, VP of trading at eBay in the UK.

Last a year, an investigation by the BBC revealed buyers were being conned into buying fake parts such as xenon headlight bulbs. There have also been a number of cases where gangs of criminals have sold stolen car parts online.

eBay’s top five ‘trending’ car items

  1. Speaker systems – sales have tripled since the start of the year, suggesting that Brits are after the perfect sound-system for their perfect road-trip playlist or podcast selection.
  2. In-car DVD players – this year has seen sales increase five-fold, as our binge-watch culture extends to our automobiles and parents seek to entertain their kids on long drives.
  3. In-car phone holders – have seen a six-fold increase in sales this year, as drivers use their phones as a one stop-shop not only for driving music but also navigation.
  4. USB car chargers and adaptors – sales have quadrupled of multi-port USB chargers, reflecting Brits’ obsession with keeping their phone batteries at 100 percent.
  5. Car seat organisers – which do everything from storing snacks to displaying tablets – have more than trebled this year