Dash cam

We’ve all seen dash cam footage online, either on social media or news websites, but new research has found that motorists with dash cams typically don’t use the footage for anything more than their own amusement. That’s according to Gloucestershire-based WMB Pride.

Of the 2,591 motorists surveyed, only 19 percent admitted to using the footage, with around half of the respondents (48 percent) using it to share on social media. A further 27 percent used the footage to assist police or insurance companies, while 14 percent used it to prove no wrongdoing in the event of an accident.

What’s the story here? After all, dash cams are used primarily for safety reasons, most commonly to provide evidence should the worst happen. Indeed, the survey revealed that 42 percent of respondents purchased a dash cam for insurance purposes, while a further 30 percent did so for safety reasons.

Last month, research from Aviva showed that around one in four (27 percent) of drivers used a dash cam on UK roads, with three in four (72 percent) believing all drivers should follow suit. Peace of mind in the event of a collision was the primary reason given by the 2,500 respondents.

When asked why they had chosen to watch the footage, responses to the WMB Pride survey included filming a hot air balloon landing in a field and watching somebody getting struck by lightning. The top five reasons were:

  1. Incidents of bad driving: 28 percent
  2. Incidents of road rage: 22 percent
  3. Road traffic accidents: 15 percent
  4. Near-misses: 10 percent
  5. Incidents where pedestrians were saved from injury: 9 percent

‘Funny clips are too hard not to share’

A spokesperson for WMB Pride, said: “Dash cams and helmet cams are becoming more and more popular with people wanting to protect themselves on the road if something were to happen above anything else. Especially with so many insurance scams and false injury claims.

“But, on the odd occasion, they’re handy for catching random moments that no one would believe had taken place. Whilst we don’t encourage naming and shaming people on social media, sometimes the funny clips are too hard not to share.” 

The survey found that drivers spend an average of £65 on a dash cam, but prices range from £20 to £300. Some people recoup the cost by selling hilarious/shocking/crazy/bizarre (delete as applicable) footage to online ‘news’ outlets.